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Classified List of Advertisements on page 63. 



The leading wholesale hardware trade distribute 
LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL, 



HARDWA1-METAL 

AND CANADIAN MACHINIST 

A. WeeKly Newspaper devoted to tHe Hard-ware, Metal, MacKinery, 
Heating; and Plumbing; Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVI 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, MAY 21, 1904. 



NO. 21 




MARK /jP* 

* CUTLERY/ 



FOk SALE MY LEADISG WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



Best Quality Steel Sheets. 

"QUEEN'S HEAD'' and 
"SOUTHERN CROSS" Brands 

Flat, smooth, free from scale, best working 
quality, moderate price. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LE8LIE & CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch 



mm 



ALL OVER THE WORLD. 




Most of Canada's, as well as the world's, biggest buildings are 
fitted throughout with 

"SAFFORD" RADIATORS 

the radiators that are famous all over the world — the radiators 
that never leak, because they have no bolts, rods or packing. 

Dealers and Steamfitters who wish to handle the best 
radiators should correspond with us. 

THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office : TORONTO. Branches : Montreal, Quebec, St. John, N.B., Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



liRMtH JWOWERS 



1 



WE CARRY IN STOCK 

Pennsylvania 

Woodyatt 

Star 



RETURNED, 
MAY 21 190 V 

<Pc 



All Kinds 



AND 



Daisy 
Mowers 

WE CAN SHIP ALL 
SIZES PROMPTLY. 

WWWWWWWWWWV 

New 

Excelsior 

Horse 

Lawn 

Mower 




LawD Goods 



INCLUDING 



RETURNED 
MAY 21 190 </ 



25 inch cut . . 
30 inch cut . . 
35 inch cut . . 
40 inch cut . . 



Weight. 

. 3fiO lbs. 

. 610 lbs. 

. 660 lbs. 

. 710 lbs. 




GRASS CATCHERS, 
LAWN ROLLERS, 
WHEELBARROWS, 
LAWN VASES, etc. 



RETURN 

21 V 




Write for Trade Prices. 

RICE LEWIS 



Lawn Vase 
No. 113. 




SON 



i 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALWAYS 
READY 
FOR USE 




Full Hollow 
Oround $2. So Bach 
Double Concave for 
extra hard beards, $3.00 
Send for free book, "HINTS TOjSHAVERS." 



The 



?8? RAZOR 



No Honing ! No Grinding ! 

No Smarting after Shaving. With ordinary careful use will 

KEEP AN EDGE FOR YEARS WITHOUT HONING. 

Booklet coming — if you will ask for acopy, with trade discount. 
FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERS. 
FIRM OF „.--, *~ 

A. L.SILBERSTEIN, <%mfifrr£ Ellta 

MAKERS OF //''Vl' 

459-461 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



THE CANADIAN RUBBER CO. 

of Montreal. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



<7 



Rubber Belting, 
Hose, Packing, 
Valves, Gaskets, 



ETC, ETC. 



We make a specialty of 

HORSE SHOE PADS 

the best in the market. 



Write for Price* and Circular*. 



Head Office : : MONTREAL 

BRANCHES-TORONTO, WINNIPEG and VANCOUVER 



Lightning;, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 





fgESpS nil 

lis 




gf 




< 



ARE 

Well Advertised. 
In Demand. 
Easily Sold. 
Satisfactory in Use. 
Of Known Reputation. 



HAVE 

Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops. 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms. 
AUTOMATIC Twin Scrapers. 
"The Ice Cream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free. 



EXCEL IN 



Easy Running. 
Quick Freezing. 
Economy. 
Convenience. 
Practical Results. 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philad u e t.A a ' Pa " 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



LIMITED 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

LIMIT 

Wholesale Hardware Merchants, 

OTTAWA, OIMT. 

In introducing. 



The 

Universal 
Bread 
Maker 

we do so with confidence, 
knowing it will do all that 
is said of it. 

To mix and knead 
bread in 3 minutes may 
seem extravagant, but it 
is a fact 

Here is a 



MIXER, KNEADER and RAISER 

ALL IN ONE. 

The old and disagreeable task of Bread-making is done away with. 
We shall be pleased to send booklets for your customers, and give prompt 
attention to your sample order. 





FOR SALE BY- 



The KENNEDY HARDWARE CO , Limited 

49 Colborne St.. TORONTO. ONT. 



Black Sheets 



COMMON 



DEAD FLAT 



Prompt Shipment. Prices Right. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co. 



503 Temple Building 



TORONTO. 



Miy 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



" If I only Had a gun/' 

You have heard it said often, and will continue to hear it — so long as birds fly and rabbits run. 
Of course, wishing will never bring a gun to any man, but you can bring the man to your guns 
if you display them in your windows and show cases — then the sale is an easy matter — given 
the right guns. The lines which we illustrate are the finest American guns, and we offer them 
at the poorest Canadian prices (which we expect will not last, as the factories have long since 
oversold their output). But we would be glad to name you these prices, and with the guns in 
stock we are in a position to give you prompt service. Write to-day. Let us hear from you 
and you will hear from us. 



ROLLED STEEL BARREL. 



NED 
\9Qtf 




Ho. 290 Top snap, case hardened frame, patent fore end, pistol grip, fancy rubber butt plate, choke bored. 

12, 16 and 20 gauge. 




ROLLED STEEL BARREL. 

RETURNED 

1 190 V 



No. 295. Top snap, case hardened frame, finely-finished blued barrel, capped pistol grip, fancv rubber butt plate, choke bored. 

12, 16 and 20 gauge. 



CARBON STEEL BARREL. 



WALNUT STOCK. 

RETURNED 




i 



r- 

I QUOTE 

LOW 



No. 1900. Automatic ejector, gun is opened by pulling ring in front of trigger, case hardened frame, pistol grip, rubber 

butt plate. 12 and 16 gauge. 



LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



SHIP 
QUICK 



IMPORTERS AND DISTRIBUTORS. 



Address all Correspondence to 



TORONTO, 
87 York St. 



OTTAWA, 

84 Queen St. 



VANCOUVER, 
141 Water St. 



MON 



At- 



HARDWARE AND METAL Ma V 21, 1904. 
.|.4-H^^- M " H " H " l "H- M " M "r*^ 

t i 

I * 

| Cordage f 

f Of every description. t 



INIet Mountings, 

53and Line, 

Unoiled Cordage, 

IVIarline, 

Extra Long Lengths, 

Ratline, Mail 

Shingle Yarn. \Jru 



ers f 

Now I 

Core Rope, To us and X 

£ Oil Well Cables, Receive 

I Russian Packing, Exceptional 

Deep Sea Lines, • Attention. 

i Anchor Line, Low-priced goods are not always 

f Good Transmission Rope, trie cheapest. 

t tn^ine Packing. t 



t 



£ Clothes Lines, 

t Only Best Material Used. 



i 



i 

T 



Log Line 

T 



wine. 



Dangerous to use Inferior Cordage, 



^■• I " I " I " I " I " I ~ I"I " I"I " I"I -- I"I - I " I " I - I - I - M-I-M I M 1 M ' I ! ■■ ! • . l - l - H-I - l - r 

4 



May 21, 1904. 



RU 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BRAND CU 



POCKET CUTLERY 



GUARANTEED QUALITY. 



BEST GOODS 




RAZORS 
SCISSORS 



RIGHT PRICES 



E. F. WALTER & CO., 



166 and 168 
McGill St., 



Montreal 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 



desired. 



Wheelbarrows. 




DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 



ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 

4 'Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improved 
for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as 



High and Low Wheels.from 
12 to 20 in. widths. Cold 
Rolled Steel Shafting, Cru- 
cible Steel Knives and Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 



In Four Different Sizes 



SEND DIRECT TO US. 

"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 




None so Blind 
As Those Who 
Won't See. 

Hardware and Metal can prove 
of valuable assistance to the selling 
end of any business which seeks 
trade among the hardwaremen and 
general storekeepers of Canada. 

We advance many plain, indis- 
putable arguments to this effect. 

And still there are some folks who 
can't see it. 

Some who can't see how it's going 
to pay them. 

And won't even invest a few dollars 
to find out. 

Very few folks like this, but we 
would like to convince even them. 

It we only could, we'd get a good 
deal of satisfaction out of it and 
we know they would, too. 

Don't you think they're blind to 
their own interests ? 

Here's a paper that finds a wel- 
come in every worth-while hardware 
store from Halifax to Vancouver 
once every week — so can't you see 
that an announcement of any in- 
terest must surely command some 
attention ? 

The advertising columns of Hard- 
ware and Metal provide about the 
best way we know ot keeping in close 
touch with all the hardwaremen of 
Canada all the time. 

You can see value in a paper like 
this — 

Can't you ? 



Hardware and Metal 



232 ricGii St., 

MONTREAL. 



10 Front St. E , 

TORONTO. 



Gait Carpet Stretcher 

Away Ahead of All Others 



Simple, Effective. Will not tear the 
finest carpet. Will sell to every household 
on the score of price and utility. Profitable 
to dealer. 



SEND FOR BOOKLET. 



Grand River Metal Works, 

Limited 

Gait, - Ont. 




Lawn Shavers 



This is the season of the year when the 
grass needs shaving. We can supply you 
with the most up-to-date Lawn Shavers in 
existence. The 

Perfection 

Lawn Mower 

is just a little 

ahead of any 

thing on the 

market to-day. 

The material used is of the highest quality 

only. The adjustment is easy and accurate. It 

cuts smoothly, runs easily, and will stay sharp 

a long time. In fact, it is the ideal Lawn 

Mower. Order a few and be convinced. All 

sizes in stock. 

The Fisk dc Jay Grass Trimmer needs 
no words to explain its use. It sells on sight. 
Let us send you a few with your order for 
Mowers. Prices are right. 

ORDERS SHIPPED SAME DAY AS RECEIVED. 




John Bowman Hardware & Coal Co. 

LONDON, CANADA. 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




Hay Rope on Reels 
Shingle Yarn on Reels 



"Royal" 
Brand 
Binder 

Twine. 








Lath Yarn 
Hide Rope 





Hay Rope in Coils 

Bale Rope in Coils 

Shingle Yarn in Colls 



"Royal" 
Brand 
Binder 

Twine. 




1AJ< I » A!- 




OUR GOODS ARE RIGHT— OUR PRICES ALSO. 

In our factory, none but the best fibre is used. Our workmen are the most skilled in 
the Cordage Trade now employed in Canada. Free Union Labor only employed by us. 

Canadian Cordage & Mfg. Co. 



RBOROUGH, ON 



LIMITED 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY 



(Established 1848 



Limited 



ONEIDA 
COMMUNITY 
LOCK RING. 



Largest manufacturers in the world of 

WELDLESS CHAIN. 

As a halter chain they are 
without an equal, as they pos- 
sess the exclusive feature of a 
patented Lock Ring-, which 
enables the animal to be in- 
stantly tied "short" or "long." 

The standard for Cow 
Ties, Dog Leads and 
Fancy Chains. 

In use by the leading rail- 
roads. 

Short lengths furnished 
without extra charge for manufac- 
turers of agricultural implements, 
makers of windmills, etc. A list of 
these users would include the best 
known firms of the country. 

Also well adapted to use for pad- 
locks and nearly every other purpose 
for which chains are wanted. 

Exported in large and increasing 
quantities. 

Address for catalogue, 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY LIMITED 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONTARIO. 



THE AUER 
GAS LAMP 



44 



Turns night-time into day-time " 

NEW MODELS. LOWER PRICES. 

We offer you the best made lamp on the 
market, built scientifically. 

We offer you a lamp that will 
light your store for half the 
cost of kerosene. 

We offer you a lamp that Is safer 
than a coal oil one. 

We offer you a lamp which you 
can sell at a good profit. 

Do you want the Aflency for it? 





STEEL WIRE NAILS 

FOR ALL PURPOSES. 
A large quantity of 

STANDARD SIZES in Stock 

WOOD SCREWS, 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS, 

WIRE STAPLES. 



WIRE 



OF ALL KINDS 

AND 
FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



COPPER WIRE 

for 
TROLLEY - TELEGRAPH - TELEPHONE 
and 
TRANSMISSION LINES 

Manufactured by 

DOMINION WIRE MFG. CO. 



MONTREAL and TORONTO 



LIMITED 



WIRE ROPE 



Mo. 25 
1 00 Candle Power. 



THEN WRITE FOR 



OUR CATALOGUE AND DISCOUNTS. 

EVERY LAMP GUARANTEED. 



AUER LIGHT CO., 1682 NOTRE DAME ST., MONTREAL. 




"ACME" Brand 

Extra tensile strength for heavy work. 



Should only be used on special large 
wheels and drums. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONT. MONTREAL, QUE. 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SHOT". 

In ordering, please specify The Abbey Im- 
proved Chilled Shot Co., Ltd., New- 
cast le-on-Tyne. 

N.B.— We also make Hard and Soft Shot, but 
strongly recommend Improved Chilled Shot for 
penetration. 

N.B.— The only Company in Great Britain de 
voting its whole time to Shot making. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 

NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

Manufacturers of FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 
manuiacturers ot ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 




Dmdas Axe Works 

Dundas, Canada. 

Write for Prices 
P. BERTRAM, - Manager. 



Steel Stamps 



For Manufacturers of 
MACHINERY and METALWARE 

All our work is guaranteed to be satisfactory. 



THE PARSONS-IRONS CO. 
58 Adelaide St. W.. TORONTO. 



Your Customers 

the farmers are looking for a fence, strong, 
serviceable and durable at a reasonable 
cost. You can supply it to them in the 

IDEAL. 




It is strictly up-to-date and the best value 
to be had in wire fencing to-day. 

A GOOD SELLER 

We have a style for every purpose in either 
heavy or light fencing. Write for cata- 
logue showing fencing and gates. 

Coiled Spring Wire 

unexcelled in quality, shipped promptly 



McGreg 



THE 

or=Banwell Fence Co. 

Limited 
Walkerville, ~nt. 

MERRICK ANDERSON * CO., Winnipeg 

Sole Agents for Manitoba andN. W. T. 




Heavy Red-Brown Wrapping^ 
FOR EXPRESS PARCELS. STRONG, TOUGH UNO STIFF. 

Canada Paper Co. 



Samples and 
prices gladly 

s.nt. 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK FOR FA STENING WOODEN PICKET ON W,RE 

WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 

LONDON, ONT 




THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO., Limited, 




" Little Shaver 

Canadian Agents : 

E. H GRENFELL & CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



Cutest Thing in the Kitchen 

Shaves chocolate so thin that it dissolves without stirring. 
Slices Potatoes, Radishes, Cucumbers, Onions, Apples and 
all the smaller fruits and vegetables 
Made of black walnut. 
Knife is fine tempered steel. 

MADE ONLY BY 

J. M. M/VST MFG. CO.. Lititz, Pa. 



FLAT.— SPIRAL or V0LUT6 

INTERESTING CATALOG MAILED ON APPLICATION 

THE WALLACE BARNES CO. 

BRISTOL CONN. 



DILLON FENCING 



THE HINGE IS COMPLETE, AND 
WORKS WITH THE UTMOST 
FREEDOM. 




*# 



f 'WP™ Sold 



CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO., Agents 

at Montreal and Winnipeg. 

9 



Sold to the trade only. 



Manufactured and sold by 

OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., Limited 

Owen Sound, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



The Sound of the Lawn Mower is Heard in the Land. 



Whose Mower ? 




Taylor-Forbes Mower, 



The Woodyatt 



There are Reasons : — Guaranteed; repairs can be had quick 
and cheap; the best and simplest, smoothest running, most durable 
mower made. Handled by 95 per cent, of the jobbing trade. 

Get orders in at Otice — give orders to jobbers — or if more 
convenient send direct, giving your jobber's name — the cost is 
the same. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE "B." 



THE TA YLOR-FORBES CO., Limited 



Montreal Branch : 

9 De Bresoles St 




GUELPH, CANADA. 

The largest manufacturers of Hardware in Canada. 

SEASONABLE GOODS 



Water Pot*. 

Plain and Japanned, 

6 Sizes. 

Galvanized, 3 Sizes. 

All supplied with our patent Rose. 



Water Cooler*. 

Handsomely Japanned and 
decorated. 

Nickel Plated Faucets, 
5 Sizes. 





Novelty Refrigerator* and 
Water Cooler* 

3 Sizes, Made of Galvanized Iron. 

Decorated in Oak. Separate compartment for Ice, 

with Nickel-plated Faucet attached. 



WE WILL BE PLEASED TO QUOTE YOU. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CAN. 



10 



May 21, 1904. 



Hardware and Metal 



••K>»><>»-0-«<>»'0'»<>'»'O'»'O-«-O'»-<>»K>'»-<>»'<>»'<>'»'<>'»'0'»-0>K>'« , <>» , <>«'- 0*«-0-»K>»K>»«M>»<>-»K>«<>'»K> , »<> , »<> , «*<>»'0'»K>»*0'» 1 <>«K>»' 

SMELTING IRON BY ELECTRICITY t 

f i 

*0*0>»'<>«<l*0*0+0'«<Hi.0*0'«^i'0'« , 0*(>«'O< > 0>K)0'><>« > 0*O*0«<^« > 0*0*0*<>t'O't<^^^^ 



IN the preliminary report made to 
the Hon. Clifford Sifton, Minister 
■of the Interior, by Dr. Eugene 
Haanel, on behalf of the com- 
mission appointed to investigate 
the different electro-thermic processes 
for the smelting of iron ores and the 
making of steel, now in operation in 
Europe, the following valuable informa- 
tion is given: 

OYSINGE. SWEDEN. 

At Gysinge, Sweden, steel of superior 
quality is made by the smelting together 
of charcoal-pig and scrap in an electric 
furnace of the induction type; that is 
to say, a furnace without electrodes. 
This process corresponds to the cru- 
cible steel process, but it has certain 
advantages over the latter in that the 
melted materials at no time during the 
operation are exposed to gases, some of 
which, when absorbed, deleteriously affect 
the quality of the product. The furnace 
worked quietly and regularly, produc- 
ing on the average four tons of steel 
in twenty-four hours. "Tapping" oc- 
curred every six hours. .116 electric 
horse-power years were required per ton 
of product. The cost, at the rate of $10 
per electric horse-power a year, would 
be $1.16 per ton of product. 

KORTFORS, SWEDEN. 

At Kortfors, Sweden, the Heroult pro- 
cess of making steel is in operation, but 
the furnace is at present employed in 
the making of ferro-silicon. 

LA PRAZ, FRANCE. 

At La Praz, France, steel is also made 
from melted scrap. The process differs 
from that at Gysinge, in that it permits 
of the purification of the materials em- 
ployed, two slags being made for that 
purpose, and earburization is effected 
in the furnace by carbon briquettes. 
The furnace is of the tilting pattern, 
consisting of an iron casing lined with 
dolomite brick. The bottom of the fur- 
nace is tilled on top of the lining with 
crushed dolomite, upon which the charge 
repcses. Two electrodes pass through 
water-cooled joints in the roof of the 
furnace. The electrodes are vertical 
and parallel and are adjusted verti- 
cally either by hand or a speciallv con- 
structed regulator. An alternating cur- 



rent of 4,000 amperes of 110 volts is 
distributed to the electrodes. Differ- 
ent classes of steel are made by the 
company at a cost per electric energy 
absorbed of $1.54 per ton of ingot. 

The following classes of steel are 
made a l the La Praz works and at the 
selling prices per ton set opposite the 
description : 

Pei ton of 2,000 lbs. 

Steel of exceptional hardness $363 60 

Class 1 — Extra hard steel 272 60 

2 — Very hard steel 27260 

3— Hard steel 21800 

" 4- -Medium hard steel 21800 

'• s — Tough, medium hard steel 145 40 

' ' 6 — Tough steel 145 40 

7 — Tough mild steel 123 20 

Interesting experiments were made 
for the commission at this plant in the 
production of pig from the ore in a very 
simple furnace, consisting of an iron 
box of rectangular cross-section, open 
on top and lined with refractory ma- 
terial. The bottom of the furnace in 
communication with the iron casing con- 
stituted one terminal of the electric 
circuit; a carbon electrode of square 
cress-section and about three feet in 
length, placed vertically in the open top 
of the furnace, constituted the other 
terminal. By hand regulation this elec- 
trode could be lowered or raised within 
the furnace. Thirty charges of ore were 
made during the working and thirteen 
taps of metal and slag taken. 

TURIN. 

The furnace built at Turin, Italy, by 
Captain Stassano, for the Italian Gov- 
ernment, and placed in the Government 
gun foundry, was found not to have been 
in operation for a number of months, 
the refractory lining of the roof having 
fallen in and the new magnesite bricks, 
ordered from a German firm, not hav- 
ing yet arrived. Nor could a date be 
given when the furnace could be seen 
in operation. Through the kind offices 
of the British Ambassador at Rome, 
however, permission was obtained from 
the Italian Government to inspect the 
furnace . 

LIVET. 

By far the most important .experi- 
ments witnessed by the commission were 
those made by Mr. Keller, of Keller, 
Leleux & Company, of Livet. Some 

11 



ninety tons of iron ore were used to 
demonstrate the economic production of 
pig iron by the electric process. The 
furnaces employed for these experi- 
ments were the furnaces used in the 
regular work of the company of mak- 
ing by the electric process the various 
ferros, such as ferro-silicon, ferro- 
chrome, and so forth. The company at 
the time of the visit of the commis- 
sion were under contract to furnish 
ferro-silicon to the Russian Govern- 
ment, but generously interrupted their 
pressing regular work to undertake the 
making of experiments for the commis- 
sion. 

The furnace employed is of the resist- 
ance type, and consists of two iron cas- 
ings of square cross-section, forming 
two shafts, communicating with each 
other at their lower end by means of a 
lateral canal. The casings are lined 
with refractory material. The base of 
each shaft is formed by a carbon block. 
These blocks are in electric communi- 
cation on the exterior of the furnace 
by means of copper bars. The carbon 
electrodes to which electric current is 
distributed pass two-thirds of their 
length into the shaft. The electrodes 
are prisms 72 centimeti - es in diameter 
and 135 centimetres long. 

In starting the furnace the charge 
is introduced between the carbon blocks 
and the electrodes, which latter are 
then in their lowest position. The cur- 
rent passes from one electrode through 
the material to be reduced to the car- 
bon block, from thence outside of the 
furnace by means of the copper con- 
ductor to the other •carbon block, 
through the charge and to the other 
electrode. The current meeting with 
the resistance of the charge, the latter 
is heated, the reduced metal flowing 
along the canal forms internal connec- 
tion between the electrodes. The cur- 
rent in the exterior conductor dimin- 
ishes as the amount of reduced metal 
increases. The electrodes are now rais- 
ed, the charging continues until finally 
the electrodes occupy their normal posi- 
tions and the shaft below the electrode 
and between the electrode and the sides 
of the furnace is completely occupied 
with the charge. Under these condi- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



tions, but a small current Hows through 
t he external conductor! the main current 
passing wit bin t he furnace from elec- 
trode to electrode. This ingenious ar- 
rangement enables the furnace to be 
worked continuously, without at any 
time varying excessively the load on 
the alternator. As a matter of fact, the 
voltmeter and ammeter throughout the 
experiments were remarkably steady. 

Three sets of experiments were made 
as follows : 

ist — Electric reduction of iron ore and obta : ning 
different classes of pig: grey, white and 
mottled. 

2nd — Electric reduction of iron ore containing a 
definite amount of carbon in the charge, 
with a view of ascertaining the amount of 
electric energy absorbed in the production of 
one ton of pig iron. 

3rd — The Jmanufacture of ordinary steel of good 
quality from the pig manufactured in the pre- 
ceding experiments. 

The different classes of pig iron were 
obtained without difficulty, and the 
furnaces throughout the experiments 
worked quietly and without the slight- 
est accident, the gases discharging on 
top in nickering flames, Showing that 
the gas resulting from the reduction of 
the ore escaped at low pressure. The 
workmen employed were ordinary Ital- 
ian laborers without any special train- 
ing. A number of castings, such as col- 
umns, pulleys, gear wheels, plates, and 
so forth, were made with the metal 
drawn directly from the furnace. The 
tastings showed sharp edges, a compara- 
tively smooth surface, and were sound 
throughout . 

For the determination of the electric 
energy absorbed the voltmeter and am- 
meter employed to measure the volts 
and amperes were calibrated in the lab- 
oratory of the director of the electrical 
department of the University of Gren- 
oble, who also ascertained the power 
factor of the alternator furnishing the 
elect lie energy. The electric energy 
absorbed per ton of pig was found to be 
.22b horse-] lower years. 

COST 'OF THE PRODUCT. 

The following are the figures which 
go to make up the approximate cost of 
producing a ton of pig iron: 

1. Ore (hematite), metallic iron 55 p. c, 
1,842 tons at $1 52 per ton $2 76 

2. Coke for reduction, .33 tons at $7 per 

ton 231 

3. Consumption of electrodes at $5 per ; 20 

lbs o 77 

4. Lime o 30 

5. Electric energy, 0,226 horse power 
years, at $10 per electric horse power 
year 2 26 

6. Labor at $1.50 per day o 90 

7. Different materials o 20 

8. General expenses o 40 

9. Repairs, maintenance, etc o 20 

10. Amortization (machinery and bui dings) o 50 

Exclusive of royalty $10 60 



To satisfy the commission, Mr. Keller 

made experiments to illustrate his pro- 
cess, of making steel. The details of 
the operation and the figures relating 
to his experiments are in the hands of 
Professor Harbord, the English metal- 
lurgist, who accompanied the commis- 
sion . 

In regard to other processes it was 
found that Mr. Harmet of St. Etienne, 
who has published papers and obtained 
patents on the electric process for 
smelting iron and making of steel, and 
Mr. Gin, of Paris, who has obtained a 
patent for the production of steel from 
scrap, have as yet no plant in operation 
by which their methods might be test- 
ed. Photographs of the furnaces em- 
ployed, except the Stassano furnace at 
Turin, have in each case been obtained, 
also detailed working drawings of the 
furnaces examined. 

CONCLUSIONS. 

It must be pointed out that the results 
obtained at Li vet were the results of 
experiments in furnaces not specially 
adapted to the work required to be 
done. With the improved furnaces, of 
which the commission has secured tie- 
tailed drawings, permitting on account 
of higher column of charge a more effec- 
tive use of the reducing power of the 
carbon monoxide evolved and the em- 
ployment of machinery for charging the 
furnace to reduce the cost of labor, a 
much better figure than the one given 
may be expected. 

The processes of electric smelting 
must \et be regarded as in the experi- 
mental stage, no plant existing at pres- 
ent where iron ore is commercially re- 
duced to pig by the electric process. 
The more remarkable, therefore, it ap- 
pears that experiments made oft-hand, 
so to say, in furnaces not at all de- 
signed to be used for the production of 
pig, should give a figure of cost which 
would enable an electric plant properly 
designed and managed to compete with 
the blast furnace. It is, moreover, rea- 
sonable to expect that as experience in 
electric smelting accumulates, the de- 
sign of the electric furnace best suited 
to the conditions of the high tempera- 
tures with which the metallurgist has 
to deal will undergo changes which will 
1 educe the absorption of electric energy 
to a minimum. The electric engineer 
will also be called upon by the new in- 
dustry to design electric plants special- 
ly suited to the conditions o£ electric 
smelting. When it is considered that 

12 



the electric process is applicable to the 
smelting of all other ores, such as cop- 
per, nickel, silver and so forth; that 
the furnaces are of simple construc- 
tion and the regulation of the heat sup- 
ply under perfect control, we mav ex- 
ited that the application of electric en- 
ergy to the extraction of metals from 
their ores will not be long delayed, 
and that familiarity with handling 
large currents and experience gained in 
electric smelting will result in displac- 
ing some of the cost I v and complicated 
methods by comparatively simple and 
economic processes. The immediate ef- 
fect of a plant erected for the smelting 
of iron ores which will demonstrate the 
economic porduction of pig and the mak- 
ing of steel will arouse the faith of the 
industrial world in the new metallurgy, 
and other industries dependent upon 
electricity as the agent or to which 
electricity can be applied will follow 
as a consequence in the wake ol this 
pioneer plant . 



AN ENTERPRISING MONTREALER. 

THE Acme Can Works, Montreal, 
have recently installed a new gas 
plant in their factory. In conver- 
sation with a representative of Hani- 
ware and .Metal. Mr. Campbell stated 
that the service supplied by the Mon- 
treal Light, Heat and Power Company 
has proved very unsatisfactory, and that 
often during their busiest season the 
pressure has been so low that it has 
been impossible to turn out anything 
like the required amount of work. The 
installation of the new gas plant will 
remove all these difficulties, since it has 
a capacity of fifty thousand feet per 
day, whereas the requirement during the 
busiest season is never more than twen- 
ty-live thousand feet per day. It is also 
claimed that the new plant will effect a 
saving of not less than 70 per cent. 

This gas plant, which is quite unique, 
is the third of the kind to be installed 
in Canada on an extensive scale, one be- 
ing in St. Catharines and the other in 
Hamilton. The main peculiarity of the 
Acme gas system is the process of forc- 
ing air under pressure through a series 
of generators containing a crude distilla- 
tion of petroleum. The oil is stored 
underground, and admitted to the gen- 
erators by means of a pump with auto- 
matic devices which control the amount 
in exact proportion to the volume of 
gas produced. The plant is absolutely 
automatic in regard to amount of gas 
produced, and there is therefore no 
storage of gas on the premises. 

WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt 8hlpmeat) 



The ONTARIO TACK CO 

Limited 
HAMILTON, Off. 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

For the convenience of its reader* Hardware and 
Metal has opened its columns for the review of catalogues, 
booklets or other such publications issued by manufacturers 
or wholesale dealers selling to the hardware, plumbing, 
machinery or metal trades. Retailers desiring such publica- 
tions may also have inserted a note to that effect. It is re- 
quested that when any of the trade write for any booklet 
mentioned in these columns that they credit Hardware 
and Metal as the source of their information. 

Pittsburg Steel Co. 

THE catalogue and price list of 
"Pittsburg Perfect Brands," is- 
sued by the Pittsburg Steel Co., 
should provide interesting reading for 
hardware merchants. Interesting prices 
are quoted on various kinds of wire, 
nails, and staples. Interesting illustra- 
tions are given showing the various de- 
partments of the company's works. The 
catalogue states that the company make 
a specialty of mixed car lots. They 
have good facilities for shipping mixed 
car lots. Some dealers can not very 
well take into stock a full car of any 
one kind of product. The Pittsburg 
Steel Co. sell mixed car lots at the 
same price per 100 lbs. as a straight 
car. 

The same company have issued a book- 
let describing their "Pittsburg Perfect" 
fence. There are some special points 
about this fence deserving of attention. 
It is electrically welded, thus making il 
practically indestructible. Both these 
booklets can be obtained by readers of 
Hardware and Metal, from Job W. 
Taylor, 388 St. James street, Mon- 
treal. 

Steel Lathes. 

The General Fireproofing Co., Youngs- 
town, Ohio, have issued a catalogue 
telling of the Herringbone expanded 
steel lath. The object of issuing this 
catalogue is to give a representative 
idea of the classes of buildings in which 
this class of lath is used. 

Corliss Engines. 

The Minneapolis Steel & Machinery 
Co., Minneapolis, have issued a hand- 
some catalogue describing the construc- 
tion of their Corliss engines. The illus- 
trations are good, and the catalogue 
should prove of value to those interested 
in this class of engine. 

Sederholm Boiler. 

The Allis-Chambers Co., Chicago, are 
sending out a booklet describing their 
Sederholm boiler. The booklet con- 
tains a sketch of the requirements _«^ 
good boiler, besides giving a^ Ue<1 
description of the Sedert^- Tnis 

booklet should prove "f^f ea t interest 
to all users of steam, j/r " 

Murray!^ Workg 
I he Murray J£~ yVorks, Burlington, 

Sue a«s«.*ffiiSr%--5ff 

tai I pii+c ofiandsome one, containing de- 
of the eng/ ld a description of each part 
jfines and boilers. 

. / Buffalo Forge Co. 
issued /uffalo Forge Co., Buffalo, have 
Hi' f / a sel ()f booklets, one for eacn of 
„;.,., '/llowing subjects : High speed en- 
vent*! Buffalo fan system of heating, 
S fi ilating, drying and cooling; Buffalo 
M1J ieT plate fans and pulleys; steel pres- 
JrVe blowers for cupola, and high pres- 
sure blast service; blowers for forge 








■ 

■>-,-■ ■--:■'/■ V^_ 

Sgiv?}.!iv.-::-;.. ". • •.".-.. •%; -if---^r^ 

.iT.-:V:;y»>,.-ii . ." . ■ - ■ ' " :■** 



Paint Profits. 

If you are selling paints to make 
money, you want to make the most 
money and to do the largest business. 

It takes the best paint and the most 
push to do the biggest business. The 
better the paint and the greater the push, 
the bigger the business. You want qual- 
ity — but you want more — you must have 
push — progress — advertising. 

If you want the best of these — the 
finest quality and the most effective 
advertising — the most helps — the biggest 
and most profitable paint business, write 
now for our 1904 Agency Proposition. 

WThe Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

CANADIAN DIVISION, 

Headquarters— 21 St. Antoine St., Montreal. 

Depots -86 York St., Toronto; 147 Bannatyne St., East, Winnipeg. 




. .>/* 






shops, forced draft, etc.; planing mill 
exhaust fans; Buffalo disk wheels; Buf- 
falo down draft forges; Buffalo hand 
blowers, and Buffalo blacksmiths' drills*, 
tire benders, punches <»<;• 

^ Steam Boilers. 

The Minneapolis Steel & Machinery 
Co., Minneapolis, have issued catalogue 
"E," their first steam boiler catalogue. 
The catalogue is a handsome one, con- 
taining illustrations and specifications 
of the different boilers manufactured by 
this firm. 

Gas for Furnace Work. 

The Power and Mining Machinery Co., 
52 William street, New York, formerly 
the Loomis-Pettibone Gas Machinery 
Co., have issued a bulletin describing 
and illustrating their gas generating 
machinery for furnace work, in which is 
reprinted' an article from the Engineer- 
ing Record on a plant installed by this 
company at the works of the Pennsyl- 
vania Steel Co., at Steelton. 

"Our Sketch Book." 

The Springfield Boiler & Mfg. Co., 
Springfield, 111., are sending out a very 
handsome book entitled "Our Sketch 

13 



Book." This book contains a number of 
drawings of the International furnace 
boiler, which are meant to show the 
adaptability of this class of boiler, the 
modifications in design to which it is 
susceptible and tut amount of power 
that can be developed in a limited 
space. 

Slotting Machines. 

The Newton Machine Tool Works, 
Philadelphia, have issued catalogue No. 
38, describing and illustrating their 
slotting machines, which have been in- 
creased in weight about thirty per cent 
to meet the requirements of the modern 
high speed steel. 

Steam Heating. 

The Union Steam Pump Co, Baltic 
Creek, Mich., have issued a little circu- 
lar entitled "Hints on Modern Steam 
Heating," containing an interesting ar- 
ticle on the vacuum system of steam 
liea ting. Thev are also sending out a 
bulletin on condensation and hot water 
work. 

Sheet Steel. 
The American Sheet Steel Co., Bat- 
tery Park Building, New York, have 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



issued a very handsomely illustrated 
catalogue describing their products. 

Tin Plate Roofing 

The American Tin Plate Co., Battery 
Park Bldg., New York, have issued 
a booklet giving some technical informa- 
tion concerning the history and manu- 
facture of tin and terne plates for roof- 
ing purposes. 

Mining Machinery. 

The Holthoff Machinery Co., Cudahy, 
Milwaukee County, Wis., have issued a 
set of three catalogues, the first describ- 
ing gold and silver milling machinery, 
the second illustrating smelting, con- 
centrating and refining machinery, and 
the third describing boilers and sheet 
metal work. 

The Lee Injector. 

The Lee Injector Mfg. Co., Port Hur- 
on, Mich., have issued catalogue No. 7 
for 1904, in which are illustrated and 
described a number of improved inject- 
ors and valves, placed upon the market 
by the company during the past year. 
It also contains an article entitled, "In- 
jectors, Their Uses -and Abuses," by 
Wm. O. Lee. 

Air Tools. 

The Port Huron Air Tool Co., Limit- 
ed, have issued a catalogue illustrating 
and describing their air compressing 
motors for apparatus such as hoists, 
drills and cranes. 

Parr Calorimeter. 

The Standard Calorimeter Co., East 
Maline, 111., have issued a small booklet 
describing and illustrating the Parr 
standard calorimeter, for determining 
the heat units in bituminous and an- 
thracite coals, lignites, coke, petroleum, 
etc. 

Gas Engines. 

"Gas Engines" is the name of a hand- 
some catalogue issued by the Power & 
Mining Machinery Co., 52-54 William 
street, New York, illustrating and de- 
scribing the American Crossley gas en- 
gine. 

McCully Crusher. 

The McCully rock *ad ore crusher is 
described and illustrated in a catalogue 
issued bv the Holthoff Machinery Co.-, 
Cudahy, Wisconsin. This firm have also 
issued a bulletin describing the McCully 
gyratory crusher. 




ONTARIO. 

JW. JNEY & CO., general merchants, 
. Bracebridge, have sold out to 

Hunter Bros. 
W. Daly, general merchant, Blythes- 
wood, has sold out to J. W. Cascadden. 
N. C. Shook, general merchant, See- 
ley's Bay, is offering his business for 
sale. 



IVER 

JOHNSON | 
REVOLVERS 




Wherever you see the sign, it stands for 
revolver supremacy and suggests IVER 
JOHNSON PRODUCTS. * Iver Johnson 
Revolvers have the largest sale of any in 
the world. 



Best Advertised— Best Known. 



Send for Catalogue. 



IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 



Now York Office, 99 Chambers Street. 



FITCHBURO, MASS. 



The business of McDowell & Co., 
sporting goods merchants, Toronto, is 
to be wound up. 

The stock of E. Braund, hardware 
merchant, Aurora, was advertised to be 
sold on May 18. 

QUEBEC. 

The Dominion Car Door Hanger Co., 
Quebec, have registered. 

Hamelin & Aubin, general merchants, 
Verdon, have eompro1rri§£S; 

G. O. Tousignant, general merC., ' 
Chicoutimi, is offering to compromise. 

Paltiel & Frere, general merchants, 
Chicoutimi, have effected a compromise. 

The assets of E. Lemire, carriage 
maker, Pont de Maskinonge, are to be 
sold. 

The assets of T. E. Flynn, general 
merchant, Perce, are to be sold on 
May 25. 

The assets af J. L. Roberge & Cie, 
general merchants, Thetford Mines, have 
been sold. 

J. A. Michaud's sale of general store 
goods, in Chicoutimi, has been post- 
poned to May 25. 

The assets of P. Ouellette & Go.,- gen- 
eral merchants, Hebertville, are adver- 
tised to be sold May 23. 



L. A. Nobert, hardware dealer, Louis- 
ville, has been burnt out; the loss is 
partially covered by insurance. 

MANITOBA AND N.W.T. 

The Williams Hardware Co., Sinta- 
luta, are selling out. 

C. W. Stone, general merchant, Car- 
stairs, has sold out. 

The Calgary Saddlery Co., Macleod, 
have sold out to F. Heney. 

R. B. McClish, general merchant, 
Haynes, has sold out to H. Reynolds. 
~"'"1 . S. Murray, hardware merchant, 
■Roco,,, ''.!> has s °bl uut t° T. N. Peter. 

W P HawW e > hardware" dealer, Moose 

t„ i i succeeded bv Hawke 

Jaw, has been • 

Bros. 



» merchants, Red 
\ their business 



Buck Bros., general 

Jacket, have advertised 

for sale. ^ 

hit \i7 i i \iant, Shell- 

M. Worster, general mere r ' 

brook, has admitted H. v l 

partnership. 

„ , . """"_ , \ral mer- 

Schwartz & Schram, gene . , , 
. . , -,. . ' dissolved 

chants, Stony Plain, have d. 

partnership. 

lants 
Edstrom Bros., general mere! r .,, ' 

Edberg, have sold their Edens 



branch to A. Norberg. 



\ 



14 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY. 

Telephone, 
Office, Park 1484. 



TEMPORARY WAREHOUSE: 
212-218 Cowan Avenue. 

CITY OFFICE— 21 Scott Street ; Telephone, Main 4056 



LIMITED 
ONLY 
WHOLESALE. 

Telephone, 
Warehouse, Park 1485. 




SCVTHES, narrow and wide heel. 

GOLDEN CLIPPER, EXCELSIOR- Cast Steel Lawn and Cradle Scythes. 




Rakes. J 

Malleable. / 

Cast Steel, Straight Teeth. 
" Curved 







, A 


Lli_ . 




TwmmM 


ib-vsc 


- 


_^= - _-^_ -.:§£.. Jl_ 














'Quick-cut" Emery Scythe Stones. 



TURNED 
V 21 M 1 / 




"The Leader" Lawn Swing, 



Clothes Wringers. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED, 



Toronto. 



We Ship Promptly. 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. 

Factory: Dufferln Streat, Toronto, Ont. 

15 



Our prices are right. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



New and Second-Hand Machinery, 

Engines, Boilers, Belting, Pulleys, 

Motors, Etc. 

Any readers of this paper wanting 
any of the abo-e goods may have 
an advertisement inserted free in 
Hardware and Metal, the 
machinery weekly newspaper of 
Canada, by enclosing this notice. 
Address 

HARDWARE and METAL 

Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg. 



The 



Hamilton Steel & Iron Company 



LIMITED 



HAMILTON, - CANADA. 

OPEN HEARTH 

STEEL CASTINGS 

OF ANY WEIGHT. 



►++++++++++++ ++++ f ♦+ ++♦♦♦* ♦♦♦♦♦Mtf ♦" 



WILCOX MFG. CO. OF ONTARIO, Limited 



HEAD 
OFFICE 



LONDON, ONT. 



? 



Door Hangers of every description, Automatic Fire Door 
Equipments, Overhead Trolley Carrying Systems, Velox 
Ball- Bearing Grindstones, Velox Bail-Bearing Emery 
t Grinders, Triumph Wire Stretchers, Sash Weights. 

X WRITE FOR PRICES. 

♦<f +++++++++++♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦ ♦+♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦< 



FACTORIES : 

AURORA, 111. 

ST. THOMAS, Ont. 

HAMILTON, Ont. 



Some VALVES are good, 
others are better, but 

Fairbanks 
Renewable 

ASBESTOS DISC 

Globe Valves 

ARE THE BEST. 

Send for Catalogue. 

The Fairbanks Company 




Montreal 



Toronto 



Winnipeg 



Vancouver 



16 



May 21, 1904. 



Hardware and Metal 




THE MACHINERY MARKETS. 



Quebec. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, May 20, 1904. 

BETTER business to ;i consid- 
erable extent in small ma- 
chinery and to some degree 
in larger machines is the 
condition of affairs this 
week. There is more tone and snap to 
the market and dealers generally are 
pleased with the week's sales. It is 
not a boom, but there is a good steady 
business being done. Besides a brisk 
trade in smaller lines, several unusually 
large orders have been placed. These 
are mainly for railroad equipment and 
machine shop installation, (juite a num- 
ber of medium capacity boilers and en- 
gines have been sold, and as was the case 
last week, wood working machinery has 
been in good demand and several more 
orders have been reported. 

The machinery business, though ac- 
tive, -is hardly up to what it was this 
time last year. As before, shipments 
are very much easier than they were a 
year ago, making it a much more satis- 
factory state of affairs for the machin- 
ery dealers. 

Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front street east. 

Toronto, May 21, 19'M 

r r* HERE is a general improvement 
1 noted in all lines of machinery, 
and there is a very decided im- 
provement in some. On the whole, the 
market situation is very bright this 
week. Not a few good orders have been 
closed by local dealers, and enquiries 
are very encouraging for the placing of 
numerous orders in the near future. 

It is in the wood-working machinery 
line that the greatest improvement has 
been noted during the past week. One 
linn in particular found business in that 
line exceptionally good, having received 
severaJ orders for planing mill outfits, 
besides having some others under nego- 
tiations. 

I'ower machinery, such as boilers and 
engines, has also had a very good run 



this week. Several orders for large en- 
gines and boilers have been placed with 
local machinery firms. 

The machine tool market has shown 
an improvement, but not so decided a 
one as wood-working and power ma- 
chinery have. It is thought that there 
will be quite a local demand fior ma- 
chine tools in a short time, when build- 
ings under construction in the burned 
area are sufficiently completed for firms 
needing that line of machinery to think 
about installing. 

One local firm expects to get a few 
substantial orders for hoisting machin- 
ery from contractors who are building 
in the burned area. The hoisting ma- 
chinery handled by this firm is of 
American manufacture, and although 
there is a Canadian manufacturing firm 
competing with them, they have slight 
fear of not getting the order, since the 
contractors are said to favor tbe Ameri- 
can hoisting machinery. 

The Best Iron-Working Lathe. 

Editor Hardware and Metal : I am 
glad to note that you have made such 
progress in the portion of your paper 
devoted to machinery topics. Many of 
your readers will, I feel sure, be much 
interested and helped by this part of 
your paper. 

I would like your opinion on a matter 
that has aroused some discussion and 
shown quite a difference of opinion in 
my shop. What is the best iron-working 
lathe offered on the Canadian market 
to-day"? Would you say that the Can- 
adian-made lathes are as good (as well 
worth the money charged for them) as 
American or other foreign lathes? 

MACHINIST. 
Hamilton, May 17, 1004. 

T. McAvity & Sons' Foundry. 

TMcAVITY & SONS. St. John, 
who for the last year have been 
remodelling and refitting their 
foundry, have now one of the most mod- 
ern plants in the Dominion. The works 
may be divided into three sections, the 



pattern shed, the iron foundry, and the 
machine shop. The pattern shed is 
quite new, and is sheathed with fire- 
proof material that the contents, which 
at times are of great value, may be 
more thoroughly protected. The foun- 
dry is devoted exclusively to iron east- 
ings, and contains a new elevator for 
the cupola, which, together with the 
staging and core oven, has been erected 
during the past year. Nearby is the 
core room, where some five or six girls 
are employed, and here, as throughout 
the building, the firm have fitted up 
everything for the convenience of the 
employes. 

Passing on to the machine shop, two 
new emery wheels for grinding the cast- 
ings, and three tumbling barrels may be 
noticed. In the shop itself the iron 
steam fittings, elbows, ties, valves, etc., 
previously cast, are tapped and finished. 
Six tapping machines are in use, and 
two new lathes are just being placed in 
position. 

The motive power for the various de- 
partments is supplied by a new 50 h. p. 
compound tandem Robb-Armstrong en- 
gine, which is supplied with steam from 
a 60 h. p.- Robb Mumford standard boil- 
er, having a combination of fire and 
water tubes, which, has proved very sat- 
isfactory. In connection with the en- 
gine and boiler two somewhat novel ap- 
pliances are worthy of mention. , The 
Austin oil separator on the engine col- 
lects the oil in the feed water, so that 
b}' this process of extraction the same 
water can be used over again. The other 
appliance referred to is an engine for 
purifying and heating the water before 
it is admitted to the boiler. By means 
of a set of tubes the mud and sediment 
in the water are collected into a cham- 
ber in the bottom of the machine and 
biown off, thus reducing the incrusta- 
tion, which is so common in all boilers. 
The heating of the water at the same 
lime to ltO degrees is also a consider- 
able factor in making quick steam. 

The buildings arc heated on the Buf- 
falo Forge Co.'s system by exhaust 
steam from the engine, which passes 
through a heater for that purpose. 

Further additions to the already ex- 
tensive plant and premises are in con- 
templation, which will not only mean 
increased business for the firm, but a 
considerable addition to the number of 
employes, of whom there are now about 
thirty-live at work in the various de- 
partments. 



17 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



May 21, 1904. 



A LARGE MARINE BOILER. 



A CUT is shown in this issue of one 
(if the largest boilers that has 
ever been built in Canada. It 
was manufactured by the John Mc- 
Dougall Co., Limited, at the Caledonia 
Iron Works, at Montreal, and shows 
thai our Canadian manufacturers are 
prepared to take large work as well as 
small. 

The boiler shown is one of two tubu- 
lar return marine boilers of special 
make, and of the same size and capacitv. 
for the Richelieu & Ontario Navigation 
Co., and when the photo was taken last 
week was lying on the wharf at the La- 
chine Canal ready to be loaded on a 
barge. They have since been taken to 
Sorel where they are being installed in 
the steamer Carolina. It may be re- 
membered that this boat, which is one 
of the R. & 0. passenger boats plying 
iii the lower St. Lawrence, ran on the 
rocks at the Saguenay last season. She 



purpose specially designed oak skids 
were made. Twenty men and an engine 
derrick were necessary to load them on 
board the barges. 



Machinery and Electrical Notes. 

Lethbridge Iron Works Co., Leth- 
bridge, have been incorporated. 

The W. J. Bradley Machinery Co., To- 
ronto, is to be wound up. 

Mr. W. Wythe, proprietor of the To- 
ronto Machine Tool Works, is dead. 

Telfcr, Telfer & Co., electricians, Mon- 
treal, have dissolved. 

J. Rheaume's foundry, Montreal, has 
been destroyed by fire; covered by in- 
surance. 

The Levy, Weston & McLean ma- 
chinery firm, Toronto, are supplying C. 
L. Foiler, New Hamburg, Ont., with a 
complete planing mill outfit. 




A Large Marine Boiler. 



was cut in two and has since been prac- 
tically rebuilt, necessitating new ma- 
chinery. 

A few of the dimensions and details of 
the boiler will be found interesting. It 
is 14 ft. 4 in. in diameter, 21 ft. long, 
and is equipped with three Purvis corru- 
gated furnaces, two of which are 42 
in. in diameter, and one 36 in. 
The steam chimneys are 15 ft. high, and 
9 ft. in diameter. There are 132 boiler 
tubes, each 4£ in. in diameter, and 15 
ft. long. It is stayed to carry 60 lbs. 
steam pressure. The total weight of 
the boiler is 42 tons. It took eight 
teams to draw them on the snow from 
the works to the wharf, and for this 



0. Desrosiers & Co. 's foundry at 
Louisville, Que., has been destroyed by 
fire. 

J. A. Hinson, president of the 
National Car Coupler Co., Chicago, is 
dead. 

H. W. Petrie, Toronto, is supplying 
the Electrical Development Co. of On- 
tario, Chippewa, Out., with a combined 
engine and boiler. 

Coulter & Campbell, George street, 
Toronto, are having an improved screw 
cutting engine lathe installed by H. W. 
Petrie, Toronto. 

The Levy, Weston & McLean Machin- 
ery Co., Toronto, are supplying T. W. 
18 



E. Wood, Orillia, Out., with a large 
Dolty compound marine engine, cylin- 
der, 6x9x12. 

The Fredericton, N.B., Gas Light Co. 
are enlarging their plant. At the mo- 
ment a large brick chimney is being 
erected. 

Fire in the furnace room of the Can- 
adian Foundry, Carrier street, Mont- 
real, did damage to the extent of $3,500. 

The planing mill of J. Kerr, Petrolia, 
Ont., has been completely destroyed by 
lire, together with all the machinery. 

The Toronto Type Foundry has pur- 
chased the business and goodwill of the 
Linotype Manufacturing Co., Montreal. 

The Montreal & Ottawa Peat Co. are 
installing at Alfred, Ont., a Brown auto- 
matic engine and an Erie boiler. These 
were supplied by H. W. Petrie, Toronto. 

The Hobbs Lumber Co., Powassan, 
Ont., have purchased from the Levv. 
Weston & McLean Machinery Co., To- 
ronto, a planer and matcher. 

The Levy, Weston & McLean Machin- 
ery Co., Toronto, have just shipped a 
carload of American fire-brick to the 
Hanover Portland Cement Co., Hanover, 
Ont., and also a carload to the Colonial 
Portland Cement Co., Wiarton, Out. 

The McDonald-McMillan contracting 
firm, of Winnipeg, will build a large 
section of the new grades required by 
the Canadian Northern Railway this 
year. 

L. K. Jones, Department of Railways 
and Canals, Ottawa, is asking tenders 
before May 25 for power and telephone 
submarine cables for the Welland Canal. 
Tender forms, etc., can be obtained from 
R. J. Parke, Toronto. 

Tenders are being called for the con- 
struction of a bridge, 400 feet in length, 
over the Grand River, three miles be- 
low Gait. Tenders will be received up 
to May 2S at the Gait Council Cham- 
bers. 

City Solicitor Mackelcan, of Hamil- 
ton, makes the proposition that all 
switching and shunting of cars by the 
railroads inside the city limits be done 
by electric power, in order to do away, 
with the noise and dust created in the 
use of steam power. 

J. McLarty, of Detroit, has just start- 
ed to build at Hanlan's Point, Toronto, 
a railroad for amusement purposes. It 
is exactly similar to the one used at the 
World's Fair. The rails and accessories 
were obtained from H. W. Petrie, To- 
ronto. 

The Fairbanks Co., through their Mont- 
real office, have just closed a large ma- 
chinei'y order from the Pere Marquette 



May 21, 1904. 



MACHINERY 



Hardware and Metal 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 



NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities de irable in a Door 
Closer. They work silently an I effectually, and 
never get out of order. In use in many of the 
public buildings throughout Great Britain and 
the Colonies. 

MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN ft SONS, Birmingham. 



WHY NOT BUY 


K 


Brass Globe, Stand- 


V 


ard and Cobber Alloy 


A 


E 


Discs, Steam and tlot 


Wa ter Radiator 


L 


R 


Valves, Brass and 


Iron Weber Gate 


V 


R 


Valves, Check Valves, 


etc. 


E 


9 


THOSE WHO DO GET SATIS- 


S 


s 


FACTION. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 


■ 


THE KERR ENGINE C 


o., 


WALKERVILLE, ONT. 1 


imited 



SPECIFY 




INJ 

Penberthy Injector Co., 



LIMITED. 



BRASS MFRS 



Windsor, Ont. 



TRUCKS 

for Warehouse 
and Factory. 

Save You Money 
Do Men's Work 
Draw no Salary 

Our Trucks are guaranteed satisfactory. 
Turn in their own length. 

MADE IN CANADA. 

H. C. Slingsby for Canada. 

Factory, Temple Building, 

Ontario Street, MONTREAL. 





"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No.14. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO. 

Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 



WORK AND 

PRICES 

RIGHT 



ENGINE & PUMP CO, 

TORONTO, ONT. LIMITED. 



BABBIT 




N9 

STAR '^>M 
SPECIAL t 
HERCULES 
METALLIC 
IMPERIAL 



THE 



(an ada Metal (p. 

William StJORONTO.Tiumioke Maim 1729. 



BEAVER POST HOLE DIGGER 

will please your customer?. 
No wood to rot or check. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO THE TRADE. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY, 

LIMITED 
Head Office and Works, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices — Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver, 
Victoria, Rossland. 





TO POLISHERS. 



If corundum be next in hardness to the 
diamond, and if emery be iron ore and 
corundum, (as stated by the United States 
Government Report), will it not pay you to 
use our pure Craig Mine Crystal Corundum ? 
It is not adulterated with emery. 



NA/rit© us for 



rices. 



The 



Canada Corundum Company, «w 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



i» 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



May 21, 1904. 



Railway. The machines are for the 

new railway shops at St. Thomas, Out. 
They include a complete railway shop 
equipment, consisting of lathes, planers, 
drills, ear wheel borers, etc. The aggre- 
gate value of these machines is $60,000. 

A. I'm>x. of Toronto, an expert mould- 
er, who has had charge of one of the 
largest shops in Canada, has now taken 
charge of the moulding department of 
the National Manufacturing Co. 's busi- 
ness in Pembroke. The National Manu- 
facturing Co. are putting in all the 
latest improved machinery for the manu- 
facture of cream separators.— Pembroke 
Advocate. 

Robert Ross, consulting engineer, 
Montreal, has been engaged by Kingston 
to give an estimate of what it would 
cost to put the electric plant of the 
Light, Heat & Power Company in first- 
class repair, and to make it sufficient 
for supplying power to the Kingston 
Street Railway Company. 

The contract for the installation of 
the boilers in the new mining and chem- 
ist ry building of the Ontario School of 
Practical Science has been awarded to 
Purdy, Mansell & Co., Toronto. The 
lowest tender was not received from this 
firm, but from the Toronto Furnace Co., 
and the reason that the Ontario Depart- 
ment of Public Works gave the eon- 
tract to Purdy, Mansell & Co. instead 
of to the Toronto Furnace Co. was that 
the boiler the latter firm proposed to 
instal is built in the United States, 
whereas it has always been the policy 
of the Department to favor Canadian- 
made goods whenever possible. 

Bursting of Cast Iron Valves. 

A WRITER in one of the French 
journals describes in detail a 
number of accidents due to the 
burst in<> of cast iron valves in steam 
pipes, which have happened in various 
steam plants in France in recent years. 
The accidents have in most instances 
happened where steam has been ad- 
mitted into a pipe, or range of pipes 
which contained water of! condensa- 
tion, and have in general been attra- 
buted to water hammer. While agree- 
ing that in many cases the water acting 
as a liquid piston may be dashed with 
great velocity against a valve or blank 
flange, and thus cause fracture, the 
author maintains that the action is not 
responsible in every case for the frac- 
ture. Experiments show that if steam 
at 70 lbs. per square inch be admitted 
to a pipe twenty-three feet long and 
one foot in diameter, slightly inclined 



CONDENSED MACHINERY ADVERTISEMENTS. 



MACHINERY WANTED. 



Notices under this heading inserted free for subscribers to 
Hardware and Metal. 



B 



AND saw, jig saw and jointer. Box M. 7, 
Hardware and Metal, Toronto. 



BOILER WANTED— Good second-hand boiler 
— 54 x 12, or 60 x 12 ; quote lowest cash 
price. Box M. 8, HARDWARE AND METAL, 
Toronto. 



GOOD second-hand three-side moulder and 
iron rip saw table ; give full particulars Ot- 
terville Manufacturing Co., Limited, Otterville. 



LATHE, screw cutting, about twelve-inch swing; 
must be in good order. Box M. 10, Hard- 
ware and Metal, Toronto. 

CTEAM ENGINE WANTED— About 7 h.p., 
<3 statio' ary. Address, with particulars and 
lowest price, Box M 12, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. 



\\J ANTED— 18-in. turret lithe; second-hand, if 
" in good condition. Box M 13, Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. 

U/ANTED — Second-hand gasoline engine — tn 
'" good repair; 2 to 4 horsepower. Box 8, 
Markham. 



YXJ ANTED — Immediately — Portable sawmill— 
* * to cut from three to five million feet mixed 
timber, pri icipally birch ; would prefer party who 
would take timber from stump and deliver lumber 
at station. Hanna & Hutcheson Bros., Hunts- 
ville, Ont. 



w 



ANTED — Good second-hand jointer and 
rounder. E. McNabb, Arva P. O., Ont. 



WANTED — Hydraulic press ; capacity at least 
200 tons. Address, giving size and full par- 
ticulars, to Box M 11, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. 



MACHINERY FOR SALE. 



Special rates will be quoted for notices under this heading 
for periods of three months or longer. 



A GASOLINE ENGINE— That has stood the 
test and proven to be the most economical 
ever o, erated in America. Made by Tuerk Iron 
Works, Berlin, Onl. 

BLACKSMITH'S tools, stock and woodwork- 
ing tools in first-class shape. Apply G. H. 
Morris, Hatchley P. O. 

COMPOUND engines — high and low pressure; 
high speed, John Ingles, maker, Toronto, 
125 horse power; a so alternating, incandescent 
dynamo, five hundred light; all in first-class con- 
dition; lately used in Grimsby electric light plant, 
now using current from Cataract Power Company, 
and engine and dynamo are no longer required. 
Apply to J. W. Vandyke, Grimsby, Ont. 



ENGINES— Gas, gasoline, stationery and ma- 
rine. E. Housev, manufacturer; 815 Queen 
west, Toronto. 



FOUR double drum hoisting ergines for imme- 
diate delivery; with or without boilers. H. 
W. Petrie; Toronto. 



ELEVATORS for freight and passenger service. 
Write for particulars to Parkin Elevator 
Works, Hamilton, Ont. 



ESTIMATES given on forced and induced 
draft fans for steam plants. Sheldon & Shel- 
don, Gait. 



PAS and gasoline engines, stationary, marine, 
^-* automobile ; also launches ; silver medal, 
highest award Dominion Exhibition, Toronto ; 
also Toronto Exhibition, 1902; write for catalogue. 
The Gasoline Engine Co. of Toronto Junction, 
Limited. 



LI FAVY portable engines — 21 to 50 h, p.; on 
* ' wheels or skids; for sawmill work; prompt 
delivery; low prices; send for catalogue. The 
Robert Bell Engine and Thresher Co., Limited, 
Seaforth, Ont. 



HOISTING ENGINES, derricks, continuous 
concrete mixers, 250 yards capacity; dump 
cars, railway construction cars, track-laying tools, 
boilers, etc. Marsh & Henthorn, Belleville, Ont. 



MACHINE TOOLS— I have for immediate de- 
livery a large stock of lathes, planers, shap- 
ers, millers, radial and other d ills, punches and 
shears, bolt cutters, hammers, presses, etc., etc.; 
send for stock list. H. W. Petrie, Toronto. 



NEW STATIONARY ENGINES — 20 x 24 
Waterous sawmill engine ; 14 x 18 Waterous 
sawmill engine ; 9 x 10 McEwen engine ; 13 x 14 
McEwen engine. Waterous, Brantford. 



PATENT, well introduced ; big money to live 
man acquainted with machinery or mechanics. 
Fred. R. Cole, 138a St. James street, Montreal. 



ROCK DRILLS for waterworks excavatinr, 
quarries and mines; steam hoists for builders, 
mines and quarries; simple, compound and triple 
marine engines, for pleasure launches. The Do- 
minion Rock'Drill Co., Napanee, Ont. 



SIX horse-power engine and boiler, cheap ; three 
horse gas engine, seen working. 102 St. Law- 
rence street, Montreal. 



THE A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO.. 
' Limited, Toronto, have for sale for prompt 
shipment the following; Two 10" four side moul 1- 
ers, new; 42" new sand papering machine; new 
40" Cowan resaw machine. Send for prices. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO. — Temporary ware- 
house, 124 Bay — standard scales, valves, 
trucks, letter presses, shafting, hangers, pulleys 
belting, mill supplies, machine tools ; " Fair- 
banks" gas and gasoline engines ; write for price 
list. 



THE STUART MACHINERY CO, Winui- 
peg — One second-hand return tubular boiler, 
60" x 14 feet, good as new; one 12x30 Corliss en- 
gine, second-hand, John Abell make, in first-class 
shape; one second-hand Barnes 19 inch swing, 8 
foot bed, iron lathe, foot power; one second-hand 
iron lathe, 24-inch swing, 10 foot bed. 



AGENCY WANTED. 



WANTED— To secure agency in Manitoba 
town for modern gasoline engine ; state 
terms and commission. Box M 14, Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. 



20 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



"GLOBE" 

STEAM and GAS 

COCKS. 

GUARANTEED SATISFACTORY." 




Catalogue "C" and Discount 
Sheet on application. 



The Globe Brass Works 

Detroit, U.S.A. 



MADE IN CANADA 




Stitched Cotton 
Duck Belting 

Superior to all others. 

FOR 

Agricultural Machines, Elevators, 
Pulp and Paper Mills, Cotton, Woollen, 
Cement and Saw Mills, Machine Shops 
and Electric Powers. 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Dominion Belting Company 

Limited 

HAHILTON, CANADA. 
USE OUR 

"MAPLE LEAF BELT DRESSING'' 




Let us convince 
you that 

Manganese 

Anti-Friction Metal 

is the best Babbitt Metal 
i your money can buy, by send- 
\ ing you enough to fill your 
requirements. We take all 
the risk. 

Every pound guaranteed. 



WRITE DIRECT 

IF YOUR 
DEALER DOES 
NOT HAVE IT. 



Syracuse Smelting Works, 



Montreal, 
New York, 
Seattle. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Gun Made 




CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 

ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. KIw^rTnT:'! 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 




SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"quality unquestioned." 

Each pair of our Bhears bears the above trad« mark 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



Complete Line TRIMMERS , BANKERS', BARBERS' and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 





Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIEBUSCH & HILGER, Limited, NEW YORK, Sole Agents. 
21 



TRADE MARK 



Latest Cata- 
logue will be 

sent in 

exchange for 

your busineu 

card. 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



May 21, 1904. 



and containing' water to a depth of nine 
inches, shocks take place, and when the 
pipe admitting steam was three and one- 
eighth inches in diameter and the steam 
was admitted above the water surface, 
the pressure was raised to 400 lbs. per 
square inch by these shocks. Still 
higher pressures were obtained by using 
a two and one-half inch pipe, and by 
leading the steam into the main pipe 
below the surface of the water. 

In another experiment steam was 
led at 150 lbs. per square inch into a 
reservoir into which cold water was in- 
jected by a tube one and seven-eighths 
inches in diameter and four feet nine 
inches long, perforated for the second 
half of its length. Violent shocks were 
produced corresponding to each stroke 
of the feed pump, and these shocks con-- 
tinned even after the pump stopped. 
They are attributed to the sudden con- 



DOUBLE-SPINDLE LATHE. 



A 



N illustration is given herewith of 
a new style heavy pattern double- 
spindled lathe, manufactured by 
J.J. McCabe, New York, and sold by 
the Fairbanks Co. in Canada. 

This machine is a new design, with 
changes in the head stock and re- 
arrangements of gears that add greatly 
to the rigidity and increase the power 
twenty-five per cent. The head stock 
is very wide on the base and rigid in 
construction. The base is scraped to a 
ilat bearing on the ways of the bed and 
is held down by six cap bolts, four ad- 
justing screws are tapped through the 
flanges where the head stock sets be- 
tweeen flat ways of bed, and the fit is 
made to 1-32 of an inch at this point; 
this allows the head stock to be ad- 



densation of steam upon the surfaces of justed slightly in order to^mperh 

the jets of water issuing from the tube. 4tfy the spindles 

In one particular accident which hap- ^*f, er anv time 

pened to a valve it seemed impossible /£»,, 

that the rupture was due to water ham^s* e ^ 

mer. In the first place, the range /^ head orjt 

pipe was well drained, and the clra^K "\ 



#* 



were fully opened just before the ^mwi- 
dent. Following are the circumstances ^v 
of the accident : The particular engin^^J? 
to which this valve admitted steam ha 
been standing for some hours, so that 
water would have accumulated in j/^ij 
short vertical length above the valye.j^ 
The horizontal pipes were well drained 
by drain pipes at intervals of about 
twenty-two feet, leading to a steam 
trap. On wishing' to re-start this en- 
gine the cock which drains this hori- 
zontal pipe was opened and the valve in 
question opened and a series of violent 
shocks were felt which finally caused a 
rupture of the valve body. 

The following seems to be an explana- 
tion of the accident : When a mixture of 
steam and water at a high pressure and 
temperature expands to a lower pres- 
sure adiabatically the proportion of 
water in the mixture is increased, the 
temperature falls and mechanical work 
is done. In the accident it may be as- 
sumed that there were still some pounds 
of water in the vertical ledge of the 
pipe above the valve when the valve was 
being opened. This water would be at 
a high temperature, since the steam 
with which it was in contact was at 155 
lbs. pressure, and on opening the valve 
the presure would be suddenly i educed 
and a sudden violent expansion of the 
mixture of steam and water would take 
place, with an aeompanying transforma- 
tion of heat into mechanical work in 
the form of kinetic energy. The cast 
iron in the valve being unfitted to stand 
shocks of this kind, rupture took place. 
To avoid accidents of this description 
the writer advised the filling' of by-pass 
valves between the two sides of any 
large steam valve, so that the pressure 
in the two sides might be equalized 
before the main/ valve is opened. 




Double-Spindle Lathe. 



/ 
/ 



are perfectly rigid in handling heavy 
work upon upper spindles. The boxes 
are of hard bronze of extra length, care- 
fully fitted and scraped to a perfect 
bearing, and the thrust of the spindles 
is taken on hardened and ground tool 
steel washers. 

The spindles are large in diameter and 
made from a high grade of hammered 
steel, of about forty-five points carbon . 
The lower spindle has a 2 1-8 inch hole 
clear through, and the centres are of 
tooled steel. The cone is large in 
diameter and has five sections. The 
gearing is strongly proportioned 
throughout, of course pitch, wide face, 
and accurately cut. The lower spindle 
is back-geared in the usual way, and 
the upper spindle has double the power, 
being- triple geared. The internal gear- 
ed face plate, with a ratio of about 72 
to 1, can be furnished as an extra for 
unusually heavy work in place of large 
plain plate, as it answers the purpose 
of both plain and geared. The carriage 
is gibbed front and back, and the top is 

22 



made flush without any projections, and 
is planed and slotted for clamping- large 
pieces in boring. It is powerfully gear- 
ed, so that it can be operated conveni- 
ently, and has quick traverse along- the 
bed with hand wheel of large diameter. 
The compound rest has sufficient tra- 
verse to face full swing on upper spindle 
without shifting the tool or losing any 
of the bearing. Blocking pieces for 
compound rest bring the tool level with 
the upper spindle, and is made so that 
it can be quickly taken off, and the 
rest set down in its regular place. The 
screw-cutting range is double that of the 
ordinary lathe, the lead screw being 
made of a very fine grade of high car- 
bon steel. The friction feed is driven 
with splined screw, the threads of the 
lead screw being used for screw-cut- 
ting only. The feed is driven by gear- 
ing and admits of three changes with- 
out moving- the gears; and by revers- 
ing the position of gear on end of lower 
spindle and the second gear on 
stud, three additional changes 
can be obtained, making six 
changes of feed without using 
the regular gears, that will 
give almost any feed required. 
The feed is engaged by a 
hand-wheel large in diameter, 
so that it is an easy mat- 
ter to tighten the friction 
by hand sufficient to carry 
the heaviest cut. The tail 
stock is fitted with a taper gib on the 
front side to take up wear, and is se- 
curely held with two binders and four 
bolts. An improved device for tapping- 
spindles is used that overcomes the 
necessity of splitting the casting at this 
point. 

With this lathe beds of any even 
length from 10 to 40 feet can be fur- 
nished. The machines handled in this 
style by the Fairbanks Co. are in four 
sizes, with swings of 24 to 40 inches, 
26 to 44 inches, 26 to 48 inches, and 32 
to 54 inches. The new features that 
have been added and the material and 
workmanship that are guaranteed make 
this a thoroughly modern high-grade 
tool. 



Good Order for Belting. 

Sadler & Haworth, manufacturers of 
belting, etc., Montreal and Toronto, 
have secured the contract for the leather 
belting for the International Portland 
Cement Co., Ottawa and Toronto, for 
their new plant at Hull, Que., the order 
aggregating about 7,000 ft. of single and 
double belting. This is the second 
large order Sadler & Haworth have had 
from this firm, having fitted up their 



May 21, 1904. 



Hardware and Metal 







The Duplex Telephone. 

THE illustration shows the "Du- 
plex" telephone which is being 
put on the Canadian market by 
John Forman, Montreal. These tele- 
phones, which are very small (only i\ 
inches by 44 inches), are designed speci- 
ally for private use between offices in 
buildings, neighboring houses, or house 
and barn. They are more particularly 
intended for a good house telephone, and 
for this purpose they are very finely 
finished and have a long distance trans- 
mitter. 

These telephones are guaranteed to 
talk as far as any battery telephone and 



SETURNE 




their great advantage is that they are 
as easily installed as an electric bell. 
They are not much more expensive than 
an electric bell, a fact which counts for 
a great deal with prospective custom- 
ers. No experience in telephone work 
is necessary to instal these 'phones, as 
the work is simple and complete in- 
structions accompany each outfit. 

This is an example of a line of goods 
which should interest hardware mer- 
chants and which would make good sell- 
ing articles for the above requirements. 

Desk telephones to go with the above 
are kept in stock by the same house and 
also some new styles in intercommuni- 
cating warehouse telephones. Quota- 
tions and circulars are cheerfully furn- 
ished. 

Money in Electrical Goods. 

THERE is money in it. This is the 
all-embracing, all-sufficient reason 
why the hardware merchant should 
stock electrical goods. It is, moreover, 
money that is easily earned, for the 



goods arc not hard to sell in a hard- 
ware store. And this is an additional 
inducement of no small importance. 

The wise hardware merchant will se- 
lect a stock of electrical goods with a 
view to the requirements of his own 
constituency. In adding a new line he 
will buy liberally but not rashly until 
he has discovered by actual experiment 
what goods will sell most readily to his 
own customers. Goods which are suit- 
able for a city trade may not be adapted 
to the requirements of a country town. 
Common sense must be exercised, of 
course. ;• \) 

But it should be an easy matter to 
select from the stock of the various 
electrical supply houses a line of elec- 
trical fixtures of moderate price with 
which to make the experiment. The in- 
vestment need not be very large at first 
until the merchant has satisfied himself 
by actual results that he is on the 
right track. 

It is not necessary to make a large 
investment at first for a beginning can 
be made with the staple lines. There is 
much in electrical goods which is just 
as staple as nails but much more pro- 
fitable. The public are always buying 
these goods just as they buy any staple 
and a steady sale is assured when once 
the hardware merchant has taught his 
customers to look for these goods in his 
store. People are continually buying 
new incandescent electric lamps and 
there is no reason why the electric light 
company in a country town should have 
a monopoly of this business. There is 
every reason why the hardware merch- 
ant should sell these lamps, and they 
will give him a start in the develop- 
ment of a more extensive trade in kin- 
dred lines. The customer who buys an 
incandescent lamp in a hardware store 
may easily be educated to look to that 
store for fixtures. 

The possibilities of development in the 
electrical goods department of a hard- 
ware store are immense, and the first 
steps will easily suggest themselves. 
For example, the reason why more peo- 
ple who use electric lighting do not 
make use of the various new conveni- 
ences connected therewith or buy fancy 
fixtures is that their attention has not 
been persistently directed to these goods 
in the stores where they make their oth- 
er purchases. The proper display of 
these goods in the hardware stores 

23 



would readily make sales among people 
who never thought of making such pur- 
chases. 

Fixtures range in price from (he very 
cheap to the very dear, and in making 
his first selections the hardware mer- 
chant must always bear in mind the 
purchasing abilities of his customers. A 
careful study of the different electrical 
supply catalogues will give him many 
valuable hints. Some houses prepare 
catalogues specially for the hardware 
trade illustrating the lines which, in 
their judgment, can most easily be 
handled by hardware merchants. Most 
of these catalogues are prepared at con- 
siderable expense, no trouble being 
spared in making them as complete as 
possible in all respects. 

It is necessary, of course, to carry a 
good stock in order that the variety 
may attract customers, but in special 
instances there should be no difficulty 
in making sales from the catalogue and 
ordering specially for a special customer. 

Of the immense variety of electrical 
novelties, many of which would make 
quick sellers in a hardware store, more 
will be said later on. But the merchant 
who is making a beginning will make no 
mistake in ordering first lamps and 
fixtures. Other lines will suggest them- 
selves as his electrical business ex- 
pands. 

Pumping by Electricity 
The Bureau of Water Supply in New 
York has made a report on the use of 
high pressure fire service for Manhat- 
tan. It calls for an appropriation of 
$5,425,400, which the board of alder- 
men has voted for the purpose. The 
idea is to provide both fresh and salt 
water for fire and street flushing pur- 
poses. As between the three powers- 
steam, gas and electricity— the latter is 
decidedly favored. The mechanical effi- 
ciency of gas and electric plants are re- 
ported as the same. In comparing the 
use of gas and electricity as the prob- 
able source of energy for pumping, the 
following points were brought out in 
favor of electricity : Economy in first 
cost of machinery and buildings ; 
economy in space for installations, there- 
fore reducing cost of land required; 
economy in cost of wages, maintenance, 
repairs and renewals; simplicity. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 




White Mountain 
Ice Cream Freezers 



are well-known, sell quickly 
and give good satisfaction. 



Model Refrigerators. 
Leonard Refrigerators. 
Model Oil Stoves *" d Ovens. 
Boss Gasoline Stoves. 

We can ship these seasonable goods 
promptly. Write for printed matter. 




The Model. 



He IVIoOlary IVIariufao't 



London, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, 

"Everything for the 



unng v^o. 

Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 

shop." 



24 



May 21, 1904. 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President : 

JOHN BAYNB MACLEAN. 

Montreal. 

1 f,c MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



Montreal - 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone Main 1255. 

TORONTO - - - 10 Front Street East. 

Telephone Main 2701. 

Winnipeg, Man. - Room 308, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

L. P. Luxton. 

London, Eng. - - 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim. 

Manchester, Eng. - 92 Market Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 

ST. John, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

New York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
Vancouver, B.C. - Geo. S. B. Perry. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, 82.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere - - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 

Cable Address j^cnpt, London. 



INJUSTICE TO CANADIAN GOODS. 

NUMEROUS and ingenious are the 
schemes adopted by foreign 
manufacturers to escape or to at least 
lessen the effect of the customs duties 
011 their goods on entry to this market. 

A case in point has come to light in 
connection with the plumbing trade. 
For many years baths have been divided 
into two classes : 1st quality or "A," 
and 2nd quality or "B" baths. The 
"B" bath had always been known as one 
with defects so noticeable that they 
could never be sold as "A" baths. 

Some of the United States manufac- 
turers, however, decided this arrange- 
ment was unsatisfactory to them so 
they determined to put into effect a new 
System. They took a number of "A" 
baths and decided that, as far as the 
Canadian customs' officials were con- 
cerned, these should be called "B" 
baths. Accordingly sale was made at 
a figure which was decidedly low, even 
for "B" baths. They were passed 
through the customs as "B" baths and 
treated as such until the plumber was 
about to instal them, when suddenly 
they became "A," 1st quality, goods 
again. By this means a considerable 
saving in duty was , effected and the 



t 'nited States manufacturers were en- 
abled to bring their goods into this 
market at a price much below their real 
value. 

This is a manifest injustice to the 
Canadian manufacturers of earthenware 
plumbing goods. They are forced by 
these "slaughter" methods to sell at 
prices which are not remunerative. The 
duty of 30 per cent, is ample protection 
if business be conducted on straight, 
honest lines, but it is not sufficient if 
by a subterfuge the value of the protec- 
tion is to be cut almost in two. 

It is only fair to the Government to 
say that when the foregoing facts were 
laid before them they recognized the in- 
justice done to the Canadian manufac- 
turer and promised to stop in some way 
the present system of undervaluation. 
This can best be done by making the 
regulations so explicit that it would be 
impossible to bring in an "A" as a "B" 
bath, or for the importer, after passing 
the bath through the customs as "B" 
quality to sell it to his customer as an 
"A" bath. If the manufacturer were, 
for instance, compelled to stamp the 
grade of quality on his product before 
entering them in this country the diffi- 
culty would be overcome. 



TRADE WITH MEXICO. 

DIRECT steamship communication 
between Canada and Mexico has 
been strongly agitated recently, and 
Signor Santiago Mendez has visit- 
ed Ottawa on behalf of the 
Mexican Government to negotiate 
with Sir Richard Cartwright, 

the Minister of Trade and Commerce. It 
will be remembered that shortly after 
the Liberals reached power in 1896, a 
commissioner was sent to Mexico to 
look into the actual and possible trade 
issues between the two countries. This 
may have been the first cause of the 
awakening. 

To-day Canadian trade with Mexico is 
very trifling. The whole volume of im- 
ports amounted to $125,575 last year, 
embracing coffee, dyes and chemicals, 
fruits and tobaccos. We sold to Mexico 
in the same period exports amounting 
to $137,034, which included manufac- 
tured cottons, machinery, gunpowder, 
and a few other articles, making a total 
25 



trade for both countries of $262,609, or 
a trifle over a quarter of a million dol- 
lars. It would take a good deal more 
than that amount of trade to induce any 
company to start a steamship service 
direct, more especially as Mexico does 
not seem to be a very industrious com- 
mercial country. Their total trade 
with the whole world amounts to a lit- 
tle more than eighteen million and a 
half dollars per annum, and more than 
one-half of this trade is done with 
Great Britain. 

Last Winter Sir William Mulock visit- 
ed Mexico, and there discussed trade 
questions with President Diaz, and other 
public men. There then seemed a readi- 
ness on the part of the Mexicans to en- 
courage trade with Canada, and a will- 
ingness was shown to share equally the 
cost of inaugurating a steamship service 
between the two countries. This atti- 
tude has appealed to the Canadian Gov- 
vernment, no doubt, as already it has 
been announced from Ottawa that there 
is a possibility of monthly sailings, 
both on the Atlantic and the Pacific. 
This should open up a new market for 
Canadian flour, bacon, fish, lumber and 
coal, and on the other hand the Mexi- 
cans will try to export to us many 
things we do not produce. 

Canadian manufacturers and mer- 
chants, however, have to give their 
opinion regarding the service before it 
will be inaugurated by the Government. 
It is quite likely they will favor the ser- 
vice, more especially because they have 
been handicapped in New York by inade- 
quate steamship facilities, not only to 
Mexico, but to Central and South Am- 
erica. 



AN AXIOM IN ADVERTISING. 

A FACT which all advertisers should 
bear in mind is that the chief re- 
sult of good advertising cannot 
be seen at the moment. To be most 
effective it must be educated. Educa- 
tion is not a matter of impulse, of the 
decision of a moment; it is the teach- 
ing of weeks, even months or years. 
culminating in knowledge and convic- 
tion. Let a manufacturer convince the 
Canadian hardware trade of the merit 
of his goods and he can depend on the 
stability of his business. 



Hardware and Metal 



EDITORIAL 



May 21, 1904. 



THE WESTERN MERCHANTS' INTERESTS. 



IN a country like Canada it is natur- 
al thai there should be a great di- 
versity of interests and consequently a 
wide difference in the methods adopted 
by merchants in various sections. For 
instance, the hardware dealer in mining 
districts like the Kootenay and the 
Sydneys will carry a stock different in 
many ways to that carried by the hard- 
wareman in a pioneer Manitoba town 
where wheat raising and building oper- 
ations constitute (he entire means of 
livelihood lor his customers. 

Yet notwithstanding this diversity the 
primal interest of the hardwareman is 
the same. Practically every hardware 
dealer in Canada, whether his store be 
situated in the Yukon, the Territories, 
a busy manufacturing town in Ontario, 
or in the peaceful "Annapolis Valley" 
of Nova Scotia, is vitally interested in, 
for instance, the market reports pub- 
lished from week to week in Hardware 
and Metal. Each and all find it neces- 
sary to keep in close touch with the 
market reports on nails, oils and tur- 
pentine, building materials, household 
supplies, etc. 

In the main, too, the methods of con- 
ducting business are the same. The 
suggestion given to the hardware dealer 
in the average town regarding the ne- 
cessity of window dressing may apply 
in eual degree to the merchant who has 
the onlv store of his kind in his village. 
Yet it applies in some degree, and the 
retailer in the village will never fail to 
benefit from reading an article addressed 
to the city or town dealer. In the same 
manner the city retailer can always 
profit from the experience of the village 
merchant. Technical hints which inter- 
est a tinsmith in the largest centre are 
bound to be of equal value to the metal- 
worker who does all the eavetroughing, 
tin-roofing, etc., for miles round his 
store and is not kept busy even at that. 

In the same way hardwaremen in all 
parts of the Dominion are interested in 
the same advertisements, in the same 
announcements of new goods, and the 
discussion of the merits of old lines. 
The advertiser who can interest one 
hardwareman can safely count on inter 



esting in greater or less degree every 
progressive hardwareman in the Do- 
minion. If some manifest interest and 
others do not the difference lies in the 
men who read, not in the districts in 
which they conduct their business. 

It has been the frequent experience of 
advertisers in Hardware and Metal that 
replies to their advertising come from 
all parts of the Dominion in almost 
equal degree. If (here is any part of 



One Advertiser's Experience. 



Editor Hardware and Metal: Dur- 
ing the recent business trip I made with 
the Canadian Manufacturers' Association 
through Manitoba and the Canadian 
Northwest to the Pacific coast last Septem- 
ber and October, I made special enquiries 
on the occasion of many interviews held 
with representatives of the hardware trade 
at various points, as to whether they no- 
ticed or read our advertisements in Hard- 
ware and Metal as they appeared from 
time to time. 

I was gratified to learn as the result of 
these inquiries, that not only did your paper 
have the largest circulation among the 
hardware trade, but I cannot recall an in- 
stance where it was not known, nor where 
our advertisements had not been taken 
note of. 

This information was, of course, inter- 
esting to us as advertisers, and justified the 
confidence we have always had in the merits 
of Hardware and Metal as a reliable 
medium for securing current information 
pertaining to the hardware and allied 
trades; and also as the best to use for ad- 
vertisements designed to reach and interest 
the Canadian hardware trade. 

We shall have, therefore, much pleasure 
in continuing the use of your columns, and 
in recommending same as one well worthy 
the confidence and support of those who 
wish to reach the hardware and metal trade 
in Canada. 

From our experience of several years as 
users of its advertising columns for our 
business, it has proved to be satisfactory 
to us. 

CANADA HORSE NAIL COMPANY 

WM. Smaill, 

Secretary-Treasurer. 



the country from which response comes 
nil iic quicklv than from others, 
it comes from the west, from 
Manitoba, the Territories and British 
Columbia. The circulation of Hardware 
and Metal has for years embraced prac- 
tically every hardware dealer of any 
consequence from Sault Ste. Marie to 
Victoria. The western retailers are 
ever on the alert for new lines, conse- 
quently the response from the west to 
advertising in this paper. 



Hardware and Metal has no rival as a 
medium between advertisers and the 
western hardware merchant, and our 
claim for supremacy in this field is ad- 
mitted by our advertisers and any oth- 
ers who have made a study of the situa- 
tion. 

The statement of Mr. Wm. Smaill, of 
the Canada Horse Nail Co., Mon- 
treal, one of the shrewdest manufactur- 
ers of the Dominion, published on this 
page, may be cited as the verdict of an 
advertiser who took great care to ex- 
amine the merits of this paper's circu- 
lation and influence in the west. 



A 



TRADING STAMPS MUST GO. 

PPARENTLY the blow has fallen 
on trading stamps in Montreal. 
At the meeting of the City Coun- 
cil on Monday, an amended by-law pro- 
hibiting their use was passed, and will 
go into effect as soon as the Mayor 
signs it. It has been explained already 
in Hardware and Metal, that on May 1 
a former by-law on this subject, adopt- 
ed a year ago, was to have gone into 
effect, but owing to some slight flaw, 
technically, it was found to be defective 
in two or three points. The old by-law 
would have infringed on the individual 
rights of merchants and others to use 
stamps, if they wish to do so at their 
own expense. All is covered by the new 
by-law, which stops the organized dis- 
tribution of such stamps, not by a mer- 
chant to customer, but by merchants to 
other merchants, in return for certain 
considerations. The text of the new by- 
law is as follows : 

"Section 1.— No person, firm or cor- 
poration in the City of Montreal shall 
give, sell, distribute or receive any 
trading stamps or coupons, nor shall 
any person employ similar means nor 
resort to similar devices, which may 
be construed as equivalent to or as 
having the same effect as the said trad- 
ing stamps or coupons. 

"Section 2.— No person, linn, com 
pany or corporation shall, in the said 
City of Montreal, carry on or pursue the 
trade of such stamps or coupons, or 
other similar devices, or their equiva- 
lent, or that which may be construed as 
having the same effect. 



26 



May 21, 1904. 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal 



"Section 3.— The prohibitive provi- 
sion contained in Sections 1 and 2 of 
said By-law No. 301 shall not apply in 

the City of Montreal, to any merchant 
or manufacturer who places in or upon 
packages of goods sold by him, or de- 
livers to the purchaser of such goods, 
sold or manufactured, tickets or cou- 
pons to be redeemed by such merchant 
or manufacturer, either in money or 
merchandise. 

"Section 4.— Any person infringing 
any of the prohibitive provisions con- 
tained in Sections I and 2 of said by- 
law No. 301, shall be liable to a fine 
not exceeding twenty dollars ($20), 
and in default of payment, to imprison- 
ment for a term not exceeding three 
months. 

"Section 5— This by-law shall be 
considered as forming part of said by- 
law No. 301 to all intents and pur- 
poses." 

Mr. James E. Wilder, proprietor of 
the Traders' Advertising Co. Green 
Cash Receipts, being interviewed, stal- 
ed that the action of the City Council 
in amending the by-law would in no 
way interfere with continuing business, 
and that conditions now in Montreal 
were the same as they were in the City 
of Quebec a year ago, where the 
Traders' Advertising Co. have a branch. 
About a year ago the council of that 
city passed a by-law similar to the one 
passed by the council in Montreal. An 
injunction was at once served by the 
Traders' Advertising Co. to prevent the 
by-law from being enforced. The busi- 
ness has been carried on in Quebec the 
same as usual during the past year, and 
will be continued in Montreal until the 
highest courts of Canada decide against 
it. Several judgments of late have been 
rendered in the United States, and in 
every case they have been in favor of 
the trading stamp companies. The Act 
passed allows any person or company to 
give trading stamps or coupons, pro- 
viding the party giving them redeems 
same himself. The only question to be 
decided by the courts is whether the 
third party has a right to redeem 
stamps given out by another. The 
Traders' Advertising Co. claim that 
any Act to prevent a third party from 
redeeming such stamps or coupons is 



null and void, and they claim it would 
be as reasonable to pass an Act. pro- 
hibiting a bank from honoring a cheque 
drawn on them by another party. 

An injunction was granted the Trail 
ers' Advertising Co. on Tuesday to pre- 
vent the enforcing of the new city by- 
law. 



AN UNUSUAL SIGHT. 

A visit to the Cowan Avenue Rink, 
which is serving as temporary premises 
for II. S. Howland, Sons & Co., To- 
ronto, would not fail to he of greal in- 
lerest to anyone interested in the hard- 
ware hade. Here, in less than a month, 
this firm has assembled practically all 
the stock necessary for their wholesale 
trade in hardware and metals. So com- 
plete is their stock that they have been 
aide to iill many large sorting orders, 
some of carload quantities and some go- 
ing ihiough to British Columbia. From 
the gallery of the rink or from the of- 
fice at the eastern end one gets an un- 
usually good impression of the constant 
activity and life in a large wholesale 
hardware house. 



BRITISH COLUMBIA LUMBER 
TRADE. 

By G. S. B. P.. Vaneouver. 

INTEREST will be aroused in majy 
sections of Canada by the announce- 
ment that the principal boards of 
trade in British Columbia have taken 
a decided stand in regard to the tariff 
on lumber entering Canada. 

The desire to have a duty imposed on 
lumber coming into Canada, at least 
equal to that on lumber going from 
Canada into the U. S., has had its jus- 
tice most clearly demonstrated by the 
fact that the agitation has practically 
been taken out of the hands of the lum- 
ber trade alone. There is not a class of 
business men who have not taken the 
matter up keenly. Every board of trade 
in the province has met, some of them 
in special session, for the. purpose of ex- 
pressing their strong approval of the re- 
quest that some measure of protection 
shall be extended to an industry which 
is of such vital importance to the Pro- 
vince of British Columbia. 

Resolutions have been passed by all 
the boards of trade and other public 
bodies which have dealt with the mat- 
ter calling on the Dominion Govern- 
ment to take some action to put the 
lumber manufacturers of the province on 



at least a fair footing with those of the 
U. S., who are exploiting the market 
which of right belongs to the lumber in- 
dustry of the Pacific Province. The ex- 
tent to which the invasion of the North- 
west and Manitoba market by the lum- 
ber mills of the western states has gone 
can be judged from the fact that it is 
asserted on pretty well-posted authority 
that nearly 10,000,000 feet of U. S. lum- 
ber were delivered in the Canadian 
Northwest during the month of March. 
The mills of the province simply cannot 
compete with people |who are using this 
field as a dumping ground for their over- 
cut of lumber lor the deliberate purpose 
of protecting their own home market, 
which is safelv fenced round from possi- 
bility of invasion from this side of the 
line bv the Dlngley tariff. 

The agitation has entirely ignored 
politics, party or any other sort. It 
is a general and spontaneous direction 
of the efforts of every public-spirited 
man in business in the country to seek 
some needed relief tor the important in- 
dustry which is not getting the same 
show in its own country that the mills 
of a foreign country get. A circular has 
been issued on behalf of the lumber 
manufacturers of the province, setting 
forth concisely their views. It is point- 
ed out that the protection of home in- 
dustries is the avowed policy of both 
political parties in Canada, that the 
only industry in Canada not protected 
is the manufacture of lumber and 
shingles, which are perhaps the means 
of livelihood of more people than all 
others in this province. The western 
mills of the U. S. have a large and pro- 
tected market for all their finer grades 
of lumber, so that with rough lumber 
admitted free to Canada they can afford 
to sell lower grades and part of their 
rough lumber cheaper, here, especially 
when the stock sold represents a surplus 
cut of their mills. 

The circular then deals with the U. 
S. customs tariff, which is 30c per M 
on shingles and $2 per M on rough lum- 
ber. In addition to this the lumbermen 
of Washington have convinced the local 
customs collectors in that state that 
under the provisions of the Dingley 
tariff they must impose an additional 
duty of $5.50 per M on B. C. lumber, 
which they are collecting. They have 
also made strong representations to the 
U. S. Government asking for the in- 
crease of the duty on shingles to $J per 
M. 

The circular concludes by pointing out 
that the lumbermen have appealed from 
year to year without effect, as they have 
foreseen the inevitable Hooding of the 
local market whenever an industrial de- 
pression threatened in the U. S. 



27 



Hardware and Metal 



May 21, 1901. 





QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, May 20, 1904. 

USINESS is decidedly brisk 
in the hardware line at the 
present time. Not for some 
time has trade been as good 
or have dealers been as 
rushed with orders. There is a marked 
activity in nearly all lines, and particu- 
larly in the goods usually associated 
with Spring trade. Dealers on all sides 
are gratified with the volume of busi- 
ness that is being done, and are active- 
ly engaged in tilling their numerous or- 
dei s. 

The gun trade has picked up to quite 
an extent, but there is a shortage of 
single-barreled in some numbers. There 
is not such a marked shortage in screws 
as there was last week, and the manu- 
facturers have almost caught up with 
the demand for wire nails that have 
been reported scarce for several weeks. 
Shipping facilities are said to be good 
and no trouble is experienced in send- 
ing goods, whether by boat or rail. Col- 
lections are reported very good and pay- 
ments much easier. There is no change 
whatever in prices this week. 

Washing Machines— Prices are steady 
with a fair demand at the following quo- 
tations: Round (three legs), $35.00 per 
dozen; round (four legs), $39.00 per 
dozen; square (regular size), $42.00 per 
dozen; square (smaller size), $36.00 per 
dozen; round rotary, $56.00 per dozen; 
souare rotary, $59.00 per dozen; "New 
Century," $72.00 per dozen. 

Lawn Mowers — A rushing business in 
lawn mowers is reported this w T eek. The 
» rowing weather we are having increases 
the demand. Prices are steady. We quote 
as follows: With 8-ineh wheel, 
sizes 12, 14 and 16 inch, $2.G5 each; 
with 9-inch wheel, size 12, $3; size 14, 
$3,121-2; size 16, $3.25 each; Philadel- 
phia pattern, size 12, $3.25, size 14, 
$3.50: size 16, $3.75 each; High Wheel, 
size 12, $4; 14, $4.25; 16. $4.50; 18 
$4.75: 20, $5.25 each. 

Garden Hose— People are realizing to 
finite an extent that they require gar- 
den hose, consequently a very large trade 
is being done. Discounts continue: Trade 
75 per cent, ; Western, 65 and 10 per 
cent.; White, 40 and 10 per cent.; 
Marcon, 40 and 10 per cent.; cotton, 
60 per cent. 

Hose Reels— With other lines, these 
are reported in big demand, with prices 
as before, 15 to 25 per cent, higher than 
last vear. 

Lawn Sprinklers— There is a lively 
trade being done. Prices as before. $2.50 
to $18 a dozen. 

Ice Cream Freezers— The Summer 
weather continues to increase the de- 



mand, which is greater than before. We 
quote the following range of prices for 
the leading brands: One quart, $1.50 
to $1.60 each; 2 quart, $1.70 to $1.80 
each; 3 quart, $1.95 to $2.25 each; 4 
quart, $2.35 to $2.60 each; 6 quart, 
$2.95 to $3.25 each; 8 quart, $3.70 to 
$4.10 each; 10 quart, $4.75 to $5.50 
each; 12 quart, $5.75 to $6.50 each; 14 
quart, $6.75 to $7.50 each. 

Agricultural Wrenches— An increased 
number of sales reported with discount 
as before, 25 per cent. 

Harvest Tools— Trade continues the 
same, with discount unchanged at 60 
per cent. 

Spring Hinges— A good demand. Our 
quotations are : »No. 5, $17.25 per 
gross; No. 10 $18 per gross; No. 20, 
$10.50; No. 120, $20; No. 51, $9.25; 
No. 50, $27.50. 

Heavy Screw Hooks and Hinges— 
There is a good business being done. We 
quote : Sizes 12 inches and umvards 
are selling at $3.25 per 100 lbs; the 
price of the 6, 8 and 10-inch sizes is 
$4.25. 

Wire Hat and Coat Hooks— No change 
is reported this week. The price of 3- 
inch hooks is 75c a gross. 

Churns — There is no great demand 
for churns at present. Discounts 
40 and 15 per cent. f. o. b. Montreal and 
30 and 30 per cent, f. o. b. factory. 

Green Wire Cloth— The weather effect 
is also felt in the sale of green wire 
cloth, and a large trade continues. The 
price is $1.50 per 100 square feet, 

Poultry Netting— Business is very 
good in this line. Discounts for 
2-inch 19-gauge standard extras are 60 
and 5; for 2-inch 16-gauge, the discounts 
are 55 and 5 per cent. 

Galvanized Poultry Netting Staples— 
A lively demand still continues. Prices 
are: Sizes 5-8, 3-4, 1 1-8, 10-lb. 
boxes, $12.50 list; 25 an. I 50-lb 
boxes, $12.25 list; 100-lb boxes, $12 
list. Less 571-2 per cent. 

Bed Staples — No change is report- 
ed. The discount on the Mont- 
real Rolling Mills Company's and 
the B. Greening Wire Company's lists 
is 571-2 per cent. The discounts on the 
Dominion Wire Company's list are 25 
and 21-2 per cent. 

Blind Staples— The discount is the 
same as before, 40 per cent. 

Galvanized Coil Spring Wire— De- 
mand is fairly active, with no change in 
prices. Our quotations are as follows : 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8. $3.20; No. 9. $2.70: 
No 10, $3.30: No. 11, $3.35; No. 12, 
$2.95: No. 13, $3.10. Carlots 5 cents 
less. Freight prepaid is less than car- 
lots to extent of 25 cents and in car- 
lots to the extent of 20c. 

Galvanized Wire— Trade continues 
slightly better than for the past few 
weeks. Prices are as follows :No. 5, $3.65 ; 



Nos. 6, 7 and 8, $3.10; No 9, $2.45; No. 
10, $3.15; No. 11, $3.20; No. 12, $2.60; 
No. 13, $2.70; No. 14, $3.70. In car-. 
lots f.o.b. Cleveland, No. 5, $2.15; 
Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9, $2.10; No. 10, $2.15; 
No. 11 $2.20; No. 12, $2.25; No. 13, 
$2.35; No. 14, $2.45. In less than car- 
lots 121-2c extra per 100 lbs will be 
charged. 

Barb Wire— There still continues a 
good demand for barb wire, with prices 
the same: We quote: $2.75 per 100 
lbs. f. o. b. Montreal, and $2.50 f. o. 
b. Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons $2.40 
f. o. b. Cleveland. 

Smooth Steel Wire— A fairly lively 
trade is being done. We quote: 
Bright and annealed, $2.50 per 100 
lb. f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, 
London, Hamilton and St. John. Net ex- 
tras per 100 lb are now as follows: 
Coppered wire, 60c; tinned wire $2; 
oiling, 10c; spring wire, $1.25; best 
steel wire, 75c; bright soft-drawn, 15c; 
hay-baling wire, 20 to 25c. 

Annealed Hay Wire— No new feature 
in the market, Annealed hay wire and 
annealed and oiled wire have not chang- 
ed in price. Same list with usual dis- 
counts. 

Fine Steel Wire— The demand is not 
very large. Discounts 25 per cent., with 
net extras as follows: 1 and 2-lb. hanks, 
25c per 100-lbs. ; 1-2-lb. hanks, 37 l-2c; 
1-4-lb. hanks, 50c. 

Brass Wire— There is a quiet market. 
Discount as before, 60 per cent. 

Copper Wire— Few orders are report- 
ed this week. Discount is fit) per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs — The demand con- 
tinues fairly active, with a steady mar- 
let. Discounts are: Best iron rivets, 
section carriage and wagon box, 
black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets 
and tinned swede rivets, 60 and 10 per 
cent. ; swedes iron burrs are quoted at 
55 per cent, off; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 45 per cent, 
off and coppered iron rivets and burrs, 
in 5-lb carton boxes are quoted at 60 
and 10 per cent, off list. 

Tinned Roofing Caps— Business in 
this line continues active. Price is 6c 
a pound. 

Screws— The shortage still continues, 
but to a less extent than formerly. 
There is a lively demand. We quote 
discounts as follows : Round head, 
bright, 82 1-2 per cent.; flat head, bright, 
87 1-2 per cent.; brass, round head, 75 
per cent.; brass, flat head, 80 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— A continued active 
demand is reported. We quote discounts 
as follows: Carriage bolts common, ($1) 
list 3-16 and 1-4 diameter, 60 per 
cent.; carriage bolts, common ($1) list. 
5-16 and 3-8 diameter. 55 ind 5 per 
cent. : carriage bolts, cinnmon ($1) list, 
7-16 diameter and up, 55 per cent. : car- 
riage bolts, full square ($2.40) list, 60 



28 



May 21, 1904. 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



per cent. ; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3) list, 60 per cent. ; machine bolts, 
3-8 diameter and under, 60 per cent . ; 
machine bolts, 7-16 diameter and larger, 
55 and 5 per cent. ; plow bolts, 55 and 
5 per cent. ; blank bolts, 55 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 55 and 5 per cent.; 
sleigh shoe bolts, 70 per cent. ; coach 
screws, cone point, 70 per cent.; nuts, 
square, all sizes 4c per lb off; nuts, 
hexagon, all sizes, 41-4c per lb off. 

Washers, 45 per cent. off. 

Cut Nails— The market is steady and 
no great change from last week is re- 
ported. Prices as before, $2.30 per keg, 
f. o. 1). Montreal. Hamilton, Toronto and 
St. John. 

Wire Nails— The demand continues 
good. The manufacturers have almost 
caught up with the orders, so that the 
shortage is hardly apparent. We 
quote the following prices: $2.40 per 
keg carlots and $2.45 per keg 
in small lots f.o\b. Gananoque, 
Montreal, London, Hamilton, Toronto, 
Brantford and St. John. 

Boxwood Rules— Discounts continue 
t lie same, ranging from 52 1-2 to 50 per 
cent, off list. 

Shot Guns— Trade has picked up to 
quite an extent. There is a imported 
shortage in some numbers of single bar- 
reled. 

Cordage— A steady market and a 
fair demand. We quote as follows: 
Pure manila, 15c; British pure manila, 
121-2c; sisal, 12c; double lathyarn, lie; 
single lathyarn, 101-2c; Russian tarred 
spunyarn, 13 l-2c ; jute rope, 3-8-in in 
diameter and upwards, 9c; cotton rope, 
21c; cotton twine, 24c for 3 and 4 ply. 
Cotton bedcord, 90c to $1.70, according 
to length. Sash cord 30 to 311 -2c; cot- 
ton candle wick, 22 to 24c. 

Building Paper— Building operations 
have* created considerable demand in all 
lines . We quote as follows : Tarred 
felt, $1.85 per 100 lbs; 2-ply ready roof- 
ing, 90c per roll; 3-ply, $1.15 per roll; 
carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb; dry sheath- 
ing, 40c per roll; tar sheathing, 50c per 
roll; dry fibre, 55c per roll; tarred fibre, 
65c per roll O.K. and I.X.L., 70c per 
roll ; heavy straw and sheathing, $35 
per ton; slaters' felt, 65c per roll. 

Firebricks— English are selling at $16 
to $22 per 1,000; Scotch, $17 to $22. 

Cement — A large amount is required 
at present for building opera- 
tic us. Prices are steady at former 
quotations, which were: Canadian 
cement, $1.90 to $2.25; English, $2.15 
to $2.25; Belgian, $1.70 to $1.95 per 
barrel, ex store, and American, $2.20 
to $2.40 ex-cars. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

Trade continues exceptionally active, 
the supply houses having all that they 
can handle since the boats commenced 
to run. Prices throughout are unchang- 
ed, except in iron pipe fittings, the dis- 
counts for nipples 1-2 inch to (I inch 
being now 70 per cent. The local strike 
among the journeymen plumbers has not 
had much effect on the jobbing trade. 



the supply men reporting good orders 
from the city trade. 

Lead Pipe— There is an active trade 
this week at unchanged prices. The 
price is 8c for composition, waste and 
aqueduct and 7c I'm- ordinary. The dis- 
count is 35 per cent., f. o. b., Montreal, 
Toronto, St. John, N.B., and Halifax; 
f. o. b. London, 15c per 100 lbs. extra; 
f. o. b. Hamilton, 10c per 100 lbs. extra, 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Business 
brisk. Prices steady and unchanged. We 
quote : Light soil pipe, 3 to 6 in. 50 and 10 
per cent. ; medium and extra heavy soil 
pipe, 2 to 6-in. 60 per cent. ; extra 
heavy soil pipe, 8-in, 45 per cent. Light 
fittings, 2 to 6-in, 50 and 10 per cent. ; 
medium and extra heavy fittings, 2 to 
6-in, 60 and 5 per cent. ; extra heavy 
fittings 8-in, 45 per cent. 

Iron Pipe and Fittings— The only 
change this week is an increase in the 
discounts on the larger size of supplies. 
Business is fairly active. We quote: 
Standard pipe, per 100 feet, in length 
under 19 feet— black, 1-8-in, $2.30; 1-4- 
in, $2.30; 3-8-in, $2.55; 1-2-in, $2.85; 
3-4-in, $3.65; 1-in, $5.20; 1 1-4-in, 
$7.35; 1 1-2-in, $8.95; 2-in, $12.55. 
Galvanized— 1-4-in, $3.20; 3-8-m, $3.45; 
1-2-in, $3.90; 3-4-in, $5; 1-in. $7.20; 
ll-4in, $10.05; 1 1-2-in, $12.20; 2-in, 
$16.85. In the above the discount on 
1-8, 1-4 and 3-8 in black and 1-4 and 
3-8 in galvanized is 121-2 per cent.; 
and on 1-2 to 2, inclusive, in black and 
galvanized is 15 per cent. Extra heavy 
pipe, plain ends, are quoted per 100 feet 
as follows: Black. 1-2-in, $4.20; 3-4-in, 
$5.25; 1-in, $7.55; 1 1-4-in, $10.55; 
1 1-2-in, $12.75; 2-in, $17.60. Galvan- 
ized— 1-2-in, $5.25; 3-4-in, $6.65; 1-in, 
$9.55; 1 1-4-in, $13.25; 1 1-2-in, $16; 
2-in, $21.90. The discount on all sizes 
of extra heavy pipe is 12-12 per cent. 
Coupling, 1-2 in. to 2 in., 55 per cent, 
discount; nipples, 1-4 and 3-8 in., 65 per 
cent discount and 1-2 in. to 6 in. 70 
per cent, discount. 

Solder— We quote 18c for bar and 
18 l-2c for wire solder. 

METALS. 

The metal market is in a healthy con- 
dition, and in most items there is a firm 
undertone. Import business in Canada 
plates, black sheets, tinplates, etc., 
shows some improvement, better orders 
being booked this week and some deliv- 
eries now being in sight. The iron and 
steel market is steady. Interest still 
centres in the harbor sheds contract 
awarded last week to Peter Lyall & 
Sons. The contract for the structural 
material to be used has not yet been 
placed by this firm. Canadian pig ircn 
sales are increasing in volume, but ap- 
parently buying is still being restricted 
to present requirements. The rate of 
consumption shows some increases, as 
compared with last year. Copper and 
tin are unchanged in price. Copper is 
still very firm, and tin is steadier with 
an upward tendency. Sheet zinc is very 
scarce at present and local prices have 
been advanced slightly. 

29 



Pig Iron— As noted above, sales of 
Canadian iron show some increase, and 

imported brands seem to be holding 
their own. Buying is, however, restrict- 
ed to present requirements, few consum- 
ers being disposed to place larg -ders 

for future delivery. The rate of con- 
sumption, however, shows some increase. 
The market is steady and quotations 
throughout remain as last week. We 
quote : 

"Disc," No. i $1750 delivered Montreal. 

"Dom.," No. 1 1350 " " 

Usual difference in price for lower gradis. 
Ferrona No. i gi8 oo delivered Montreal. 

No. 2 17.50 

No. 3 16 50 

No. 4 16.00 

Londonderry. $18.50 to $19.00 delivered Montreal. 

Summerlee 18. 50 " 

Glengarnock . 20.25 to 20.75 " " 

Gartsherrie 20.00 

Carnbroe 18.50 " 

Carron No. 1 19.00 

(special) 17.50 

Ayresome No. 1 17.50 " 

No 3 16.90 

Clarence No. 1 16.25 

No. 3 16.00 

Bar Iron— Prices are steady at former 
quotations. Supplies are not very large. 
We quote; Merchants' bar. $1.75; horse 
shoe iron, $2; forged iron, $1.95. 

Black Sheets— Firmly held in sym- 
pathy with strong primary market. We 
quote: 28-gauge, $2.35; 26-gauge, $2.30; 
22 to 24-gauge, $2.25; 1!) to 20-gauge, 
$2.20; 8 to 10-gauge, $2.35. 

Steel— Interest centres in the contract 
for structural material for the new 
steel sheds to be erected on the harbor 
front. Local business in steel has been 
up to expectations. Customers are call- 
ing now for prompt shipment. We quote: 
Sleighshoe, $1.90; tire, $1.95 to 
$2.10; spring, $2.75 to $2.95; toe 
calk, $2.55; machinery (iron finish), 
$2.45; square harrow, $2.45. 

Tool Steel— Some business is reported 
this week. We quote: Black Diamond, 8 
to 9c; Sanderson's, 8 to 9c, according to 
the grade; Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & Col- 
ver's, 10 to 20c; "Air Hardening," 65c 
per lb.; Conqueror, 7 l-4c. 

Sheet Zinc— Supplies are short and in 
sequence prices are very firm. The 
best price for cask lots is now $6.25, 
and it may be necessary to advance this. 
Smaller quantities are selling at about 
$6:50. 

Galvanized Iron— Trade is quite 
active. Quotations are firmly main- 
tained. We quote: 28-gauge, Queen's 
Head, $4.30; Gorbal's "Best Best," 
$4.30: Apollo, 10 3-4 oz., $4.30; Fleur- 
de-Lis, $4; Comet, $4; Bell brand, $4. 
In less than case lots 25c extra. 

Tinplates — Very firm. Cokes. $3.75 
and charcoals $4. 

Terne Plates— We quote $6.75. 

Canada Plates — Import business 
shows some improvement. Quotations 
are: 52s, $2.30; 60s, $2.35; 75s. 
$2.40; full polished, $3.60 and galvan- 
ized $4 to $4.10; galvanized 60s, $4.25 
to $4.35. 

Ingot Tin— The tin market is steadier 
this week, and the tendency is now to- 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



May 21, 1904. 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE ft CO. 

WELLINGTON ST.", MONTREAL 

Deseronto Iron Co, 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ot 



Charcoal Pig Iron 



BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is r< quired ; Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



C( 



MIDLAND 



55 



BRAND 



Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Write for Price to Sales Agents 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT Limited 



We invite inquiries for 

Steel Rails 



BAR IRON, PIG IRON GALVANIZED IRON. 
CANADA PLATES, TINPLATES, WIRE ROPE 
(W. B. BROWN « CO.), CEMENT, FIRE BRICKS 
ORE BAGS, GRAIN BAGS, ETC. 



C.F. JACKSON & CO., Limited 

Importers and Commission Merchants 

151 Hastings St. W., VANCOUVER, B.C.' 
and LIVERPOOL. ENGLAND. 



wards an advance. Local (imitations are 
now 31 1-2 to 32c. 

Ingot Copper— The market shows in- 
creasing strength, but former quota- 
tions of 14c per lb. for quantities still 
obtains. 

Pig Lead— The market is still easy. 
Quotations on the local market are still 
$3.35 to .$3.45. 

Antimony— Cookson's is still quoted 
at 7 3-4c to 8c. 

Coil Chain — Quotations are: No. 
6c, 10c; No. 5, 9c; No. 4, 8 l-2c; 
No. 3, 7c; 1-4-in, $6.10; 5-16- 
in. $4.70; 3-8-in, $4; 7-16-in, $3.80; 
1-2-in, $3.70; 9-16-in, $3.55; 5-8-in, 
$3.35; 3-4-in, $3.30; 7-8-in, $3.25; and 
1-in, $3.20 with 10c allowance on car- 
lots. 

Zinc Spelter— Still scarce. Quoted at 
6c. 

Scrap Metals and Old Materials — 
Rubbers are cheaper. We quote: 
Heavy copper and wire, 11 to 
11 l-2c per lb; light copper, 101-2c; 
heavy red brass, 10 to 101-4c; heavy 
vellow brass, 81-2c; light brass, 51-2c; 
lead, 2 3-4c; zinc, 2 3-4 to 3c; iron, No. 
1 wrought, $10 to $12; machinery scrap, 
$15 to $16; stove plate, $12; mixed 
country rags, 65 to 75c per 100 lbs; old 
rubbers, 5 1-2 to 6c per lb . 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street, East. 

I Toronto, May 20, 1904. 

A STEADY trade in all seasonable 
lines continues, business being 
chiefly of a sorting nature. Farm- 
ers are busy seeding and retailers are 
not asking for a great deal of! goods for 
farmers' trade at the moment, but there 
is much activity in builders' materials 
and mechanics' tools, also household 
utensils. Business in small supplies 
such as bolts, nuts, screws, etc., keep 
brisk. There is also a good call for 
fishing tackle, the price of which is 
practically the same as a week ago. On 
the whole, the outlook is satisfactory. 
"The activity of the last lew weeks," 
said one of the shrewdesl wholesale 
dealers tiiis week, "has shown a big im- 
provement on the early weeks of the 
year, but it has not been sufficient to 
make the volume of trade for the sea- 
son as large as last year or as large as 
we anticipated. Trices are steady 
throughout. 

Washing Machines— The advance in 
price and the activity continues. 
The quotations now are: Round, react- 
ing washer, per doz., $56; square, re- 
acting washer, per doz., $59; Eclipse, 
$48; Dowswell, $36; New Century, $72. 
Oil Stove Wick — Prices are steady 
since the advance of about 10 ret cent, 
last week. 

Steel Track Door Hangers— We quote 
as follows: Steel track, 1x3-16 inches, 
$3.75; 1 1-4x3-16 inches, $4.75. At least 
one bouse is, however, quoting as low as 
$3.50 for 1-inch track hangers. 

Chain- Business of a sorting nature 
continues excellent. Prices are still as 



follows: l-4-inch,*$5.60; 5-16 inch, $4.45; 
3-8-inch, $3.85; 7-16-inch, $3.70; 1-2-inch 
$3.55; 9-16-inch, $3.45; 5-8-inch, $3.35; 
3-4-inch, $3.25. 

Step Ladders — There is a good demand 
for pine ladders on this market at 10c 
per foot for 3 to 6 feet, and lie per foot 
for 7 to 10 feet ladders. 

Lawn Mowers— Retailers are well 
supplied, but evidently trade is good 
in this line as repeat orders are com- 
mon. Prices are unchanged, as 
follows: Woodyatt, 10 1-2 inch 
wheel, $8.50; Star, 9 inch, $7; 
Daisy, 8 inch, $5.75; Philadelphia, 
71-2 inch, $7; Ontario, 71-2 inch, 
$15.80; King Edward, 12 inch, $9.50 
(14-inch cut in aboce). D. Maxwell & 
Sons, 101-2 inch, $7.50 to $10; 9 inch, 
$5.50 to $6.25; 8 inch, $4.90 to $5.50. 
Discount 50 per cent. 

Screen Doors— A good trade is doing 
in this line. We quote as follows: Com- 
mon, two or three panel, walnut, 4 inch, 
$6.50; yellow and green stained, $6.75; 
in natural colors oil finish, $8.75, with 
20c less for 3-inch style. 

Screen Wire Cloth— Prices steady at 
$1.50 per 100 square feet. 

Spring Hinges— An improved trade is 
reported with prices steady as follows: 
No. 5, $17.25 per gross; 'No. 10, $18 
per gross; No. 20, $10.50; No. 120. $20; 
No. 51, $9.25; No. 50, $27.50. 

Barb Wire— Activity continues. We 
quote as follows : $2.75 per 100 lbs, f.o.b. 
Toronto and $2.50 f.o.b. Cleveland. Car- 
lots of 15 tons, $2.40 f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Galvanized Wire— A sorting trade is 
doing, prices are firm as follows: No. 5, 
$3.65; Nos. 6. 7 and 8, $3.10; No. 

9, $2.45; No. 10, $3.15; No. 11. $3.20- 
No. 12, $2.60; No. 13, $2.70; No. 14, 
$3.70. In carlots f.o.b. Cleveland, No. 
5, $2.15; Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9, $2.10; No. 

10. $2.15; No. 11, $2.20; No. 12, $2.25; 
No. 13, $2.35; No. 14, $2.45. In less 
than carlots, 12 l-2c per 100 lbs extra 
charged. 

Coiled Spring Wire— An excellent de- 
mand continues. The market is steady. 
Our quotations are as follows: 
No . 9, $2 . 70 per 100 lbs, freights equal- 
ized with factory points at Montreal, 
Hamilton, London, Welland or Walker- 
ville and allowance to other points up 
to 25c; carlots, $2.65, freight allowance 
to 20c. 

Wire Nails— There is a fairly good 
trade. Prices are firm. Quotations are : 
$2.45 per keg f.o.b. Toronto, with carlots 
$2.40. 

Cut Nails— A moderate trade doing, 
with prices steady' at $2.30 per keg f.o.b. 
Toronto and Hamilton. 

Horseshoes— There is not much activ- 
ity. Prices keep steady, how- 
ever, as follows: Iron shoes, 
Bight and medium pattern, No. 2 
and larger, $3.80; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.05; snow No. 2, and larger, $4.05; No. 
1 and smaller, $4.30: light steel shoes. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.95; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.20; featherweight, all sizes, 
to 4. $5.50; toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 
4. $6.75. If shipped from factory 15c 
less. 






30 



May 21, 1904. 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



Horsenails— Business is less active. 
Prices are unchanged. We still quote 
discounts as follows: "C" brand, 40, 
10 and 7 1-2 per cent.; other brands 55 
and 57 1-2 per cent. 

Screws— An active demand continues. 
Prices are unchanged. We quote: 
Flat head bright, 87 1-2 per cent, 
discount ; round head bright, 82 1-2 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 80 per cent.; 
round head brass, 75 per cent. ; round 
head bronze, 70 per cent. ; flat head 
bronze, 75 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— Business keeps 
active in all sizes. Prices are firm. We 
quote as follows: Iron rivets, 60 and 10 
per cent, discounts; iron burrs, 55 per 
cent. ; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 45 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— A good trade con- 
tinues, manufacturers still reporting dif- 
ficulty in supplying lines. We still 
quote: Carriage bolts, common ($1 list), 
3-16 and 1-4-inch, 60 per cent. ; 
5-16 and 3-8-inch, 55 and 5 per cent. ; 
7-16 and up, 55 per cent . ; carriage bolts, 
full square ($2.40 list), 60 per cent.; 
carriage bolts, Norway iron ($3 list), 
60 per cent. ; machine bolts, 3-8 and less, 
60 per cent. ; 7-16 and up, 55 and 5 per 
cent.; coach screws, cone points, 66 2-3 
and 10 per cent. 

Cordage — Deliveries of twine con- 
tinue and some orders are still being 
taken. The quotations on binder 
twine for the season of 1904 are as fol- 
lows: Sisal, 10 l-4c; standard, 10 l-4c; 
standard Manila (550 ft.), 11 l-4c; Man- 
ila (600 ft.), 12 l-4c; pure Manila (650 
ft,), 13 l-4c. Five-ton lots l-8c less. 
Carload lots l-4c less Prices on other 
lines are unchanged as follows: Pure 
manila, 15c; British pure manila, 
121-2c; sisal, 12c; double lathyarn, lie; 
single lathyarn, 101-2c; double shingle- 
yarn, lie; single shingle yarn, 101-2c; 
sashcord 'Hercules,' 32 to 35c; 'Star,' 
36 to 38c; cotton rope, 3-16-inch and up, 
201-2 to 22c; 5 32-inch, 25 to 27c; 1-8- 
inch, 25 to 28c; cotton twine, 3-ply 25 
to 28c; 4-ply 32 to 34c; calking cotton, 
16 1-2 to 17c; cotton waste, eclored, 
6 3-4c; white, 11 to 13c. 

Cement — The market is active this 
week. Contractors are now calling for 
cement in large quantities, as the build- 
ing trade is getting busv. We quote: 
Canadian Portland, $1.90 to $2.25; 
American Portland, $2 to $2.10 f.o.b. 
Toronto. 

Firebrick— Firebricks are in good de- 
mand at the following prices: English 
and Scotch at 28 to 35c. 

Building Paper— There is a brisk 
trade being done in building- paper 
at prices we quote below: 
Tarred felt, $1.85 per 100 lbs; 
2-ply ready roofing, 90c per roll; 3-ply, 
$1.15 per roll; carpet felt, $2.25 per 
100 lb; dry seathing, 40c per roll; tar 
sheathing, 50c per roll; dry fibre, 55c 
per roll; tarred fibre, 65c per roll; O.K. 
and I.X.L., 70c per roll; heavy straw 
and sheathing, $35 per ton; slaters' felt, 
60c per roll. 



Tinned Sheets 
Tinplates 
Canada Plates 
Polished Sheets 

ETC, ETC 

FROM STOCK OR FOR IMPORT 

A. C. LESLIE & CO 

509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 


ALPHA 

HIGH SPEED STEEL 

Crucible Cast Steel 

for Tools of all kinds. 

"B.C." Miners' Drill Steel 

B. K. MORTON & CO. 

SHEFFIELD, ENQ. 

Agents for British Columbia : 

E. G. PRIOR & CO,, Limited, Victoria. 

Canadian Rep. 

D. W. CLARK, P.O. Box 520, Toronto. 






McDOUGALL STANDARD PUMPS 

_ btand the hard usage better 

(Qh than any other pump made, 

&Bs£k Di as they an- composed of iron 

Sf ■ and steel, which wears much 

■E5» J] better than wood. 

1 rla M They are MADE IN CANADA, 

JB^v m by Canadian mechanics, and 

^JStISB^lY y° u snoul d handle them in 

1 ff_^MjQ|T* preference to foreign makps. 

jS**"*^ Send for catalog. 

The R. McDougall Co., Limited 

GALT, ONTARIO. 


Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u « 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of «m ^i 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 







"LONDON HIGH-GRADE 

COILED SPRING WIRE 

Has a perfect coil or spiral 
not a kink. It is made from 
a special wire containing a 
high percentage of carbon, 
which we get from the Am- 
erican Steel and Wire Co.'s 
Mills at Cleveland. This 
wire is not equalled by the 
; product of any other concern 
either in tensile strength or in 
the galvanizing. 

London Coiled Wire in 

■ No. 12 Gauge is at least 25 

| per cent, stronger than that 

sold by our competitors. A 

test will prove the correct- 

ness of our assertion. 

We have hundreds of tons 
in all sizes and kinds in stock, 
and can ship you 500 lbs. or 
five cars within 24 hours after 
receiving order. 
If you want prompt shipment send us your orders for Coiled, Plain, Barb or Staples; 
also Steel Gates in all sizes. 

LONDON BALLED WEAVING WIRE (in small balls) 
Works like a charm. Just suits the farmers. 

The London Fence Machine Co., 

LONDON, ONTARIO. CLEVELAND, OHIO. 

31 




Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



May 21, 1904. 



PLUMBING GOODS. 

Business continues active in all lines, 
especially in iron pipe and fittings, en- 
ameled ware and brass goods of all 
kinds. There is considerable cutting- in 
several lines, notably iron pipe and en- 
ameled ware. In the latter line sev- 
eral attempts have been made to in- 
troduce U. S. goods at "slaughter 
prices." The great bulk of the trade, 
however, continues to go to the Can- 
adian manufacturers. No changes in 
prices are reported. 

Lead Pipe— Prices are unchanged. 
We quote : Lead, 7c ; lead waste pipe, 8c ; 
discount 35 per cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Prices remain 
unchanged, while there is a good amount 
of trade being done. We quote: Medi- 
um and extra heavy pipe and fittings, 
60 per cent.; 7 and 8-inch pipe 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— A brisk trade is 
being done, with considerable price- 
cutting. We quote nominally: Malleable 
fittings, 20 per cent.; cast iron (stand- 
ard), 571-2 per cent.; headers, 521-2 
per cent.; flanged unions, 60 per cent.; 
malleable bushings and plugs, 57 1-2 per 
cent.; nipples up to 6-inch inclusive, 
671-2 per cent. 

Copper Range Boilers— A fair, steady 
trade is being done since the new prices 
were issued. Discounts at 15 per cent, 
continue. 

Iron Pipe— Prices are being cut by 
dealers, and a considerable amount 
of business is being done. We 
ouote nominally f. o. b. Toronto: 
Black pipe, 1-8-inch, $3.05; 1-4-inch, 
$2.07; 3-8-inch, $2.25; 1-2-inch, 
$2.50; 3-4-inch, $3.22; 1-inch, $4.58; 
11-4-inch, $6.47; 11-2-inch, $7.85; 2- 
inch, $11.05; 21-2-inch, $19.25; 3-inch, 
$22.75; 31-2-inch, $28.75; 4-inch, 
$35.25. Galvanized pipe, 1-4-inch, 
$2.88; 3-8-inch, $3.11; 1-2-inch, $3.42; 
3-4-inch, $4.40; 1-inch, $6.35; 1 1-4-inch, 
$8.80; 11-2-inch, $10.75; 2-inch, $14.80. 
Enameled Ware— Some disturbance in 
the market has been created by the offer- 
ing of U. S. enafcneled ware on this 
market at slaughter prices. To meet 
this competition Canadian makers have 
reduced prices 50c to $1 for "B" quali- 
ties. There is a good trade doing. We 
quote: "Standard" 5 1-2 feet rolled 
rim, first quality, at $21.60; second 
quality, $15.50 to $16. 

METALS. 

The metal market continues to mani- 
fest a state of depression. The con- 
tinued reports of a weakening market 
in the United States have had the effect 
of causing a general timidity on the part 
of foundrymen and machinists as to pur- 
chasing pig iron and steel products. 
Buying is, generally speakino-. of a hand- 
to-mouth nature, yet though orders are 
small they aggregate a large volume. 
Business in sheet metals has doubtless- 
ly been affected by the state of the iron 
and steel market, for there is hesitancv 
in placing large orders for future de- 
livery. Why this should be so is diffi- 
cult to determine, as prices in practi- 



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WALTER GROSE, Selling Agent, 



MONTREAL. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers ot 
Set and Cap Screws, Special Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuts of every variety of finish. 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



DOIT 
NOW 



MANUFACTURERS WISHING TO BE 
REPRESENTED IN 

MANITOBA 



COMMUNICATE WITH 



DAVID PHILIP, Manufacturers' Agent 



References Furnished. 



470 Main St., Baker Block, WINNIPEG, MAN. 




The Utica Staple Puller 



WANTED — by every farmer in the land 
Saves wire, wages, time and annoyance. 
Can be used as wire cutter, wire stretcher 
hammer, staple puller, etc., etc. 

Send for the " Green Book " of Hardware Specialties for description and price. 

UTICA DROP FORCE & TOOL CO. THE SMITH, HEMENWAY & CO., 

Mfrs. of Nippers and Flyers. Mfrs. of Cutlery and Hardware Specialties. 

296 Broadway, New York, New York. 
Canadian Sample Boom : 215 Coristioe Bldg., MOSTREAL. ALLES C. JENKING, Canadian Manager. 



cally all these lines are normal and are 
not likelv to show any material reduc- 
tion for some time. 

Pig Iron— The market situation is 
much the same as last week, with pos- 
sibly an emphasis on the weaker feel- 
ing consequent on the weak tone in the 
United States market, Some English 
iron is coming- forward through Mont- 
real. Some sales of U. S. iron are also 
reported. The bulk of the business, how- 
ever, is going to the Hamilton, Midland 
and Sydney furnaces. Prices remain as 
follows : 

Hami\ e to b n°No f 'l b -' T ° ' ?nt °: '■■■■■ '"""'.".V** to *19 00 
Hamilton, £0. 1 „ 18 00 to 18 50 

Midland,!-! - "••;;;;;;;;;;;«£ !S SS 

•• No. 1 f.o.b. Midland/. 17 00 to 17 50 

Badnor, f.o.b. furnaces ,;'v|., f J n „ 

Londonderry, f.o.b. furnaces 17 50 to 18 00 

Bar Iron— Competition for business 
in this line continues keen. Buying is 
fairly brisk. We quote $1.75 f. o. b. 
Toronto, with discount of 2 per cent. For 
extras as cut to length while rolling, 

32 



2 feet and over, 10c per 100 
lb; 1 foot and under 2 feet, 15c; under 
1 foot, 20c ; over 20 feet by special agree- 
ment according to length and size. 

Steel— Buying is fairly liberal, but 
competition for business is so keen that 
the prices quoted are merely nominal. 
Quotations are as follows: Morton's 
high speed, 65c; Morton's tool steel, 14c; 
Jessop's high speed, 60c; Jessop's 
"Standard" tool, 14c; "Chas. Leon- 
ard," 8 to 9c; Jessop's best crucible 
sheet steel, 14c; Crucible Steel Co.'s 
"Black Diamond," 10 to lie; "Silver," 
13c; "Special," 17c; "Rex" high speed, 
65 to 75c; "Self Hardening," 45 to 
50c. 

Black Sheets— There is a good de- 
mand. Prices continue firm. 

Canada Plates— A fair demand is re- 
ported. A large quantity is being dis- 
charged at Montreal for delivery 
throughout Ontario. Prices are steady. 
We ouote as below: All dull, $2.50: half- 



May 21, 1904. 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



polished, $2.60; and all-bright, $3.50. 

Tin— Considerable business has been 
done. Stocks are Light. Quotations 
locally arc firm but unchanged at 30 to 
30 l-2e. 

Galvanized Sheets— There is a good 
demand a1 unchanged prices. Quotations 
arc as follows: Queen's Head, $4.25 for 
28 gauge; American, $4 for 28 gauge; 
Bell brand, $4.25 for 28 guage; Gordon 
Crown, $4.25 for 28 gauge. 

Tinplates — Considerable business has 
been done. Stocks are Light. We quote: 
Cuke plates, bright, 14x20, $3.10; 
charcoal plates, $4.25. 

Copper — Business in ingot is quiet, 
but there is a fair trade in sheet cop- 
per. Prices are steady. We 
quote; Ingot copper, $13.75, and sheet 
copper, $20 per 100 lbs. 

Brass — There is a fair trade, with the 
discount steady at 15 per cent. 

Lead — There is a good demand at un- 
changed prices. We quote $3.30 per 100 
lbs. for ])iii' lead and $3.(55 for bar lead. 

Zinc Spelter— Stocks are light. Buy- 
ing is active at (i to 6 l-2c per lb. 

Solder — There is a fair trade. Prices 
are l-2c lower. We quote: Guaranteed 
half-and-half at 17 1-2 to 18c, and wip- 
ing 16 1-2 to 17c. 

Antimony— 8c per lb. 

Old Material— The market is decided- 
ly dull this week, there bein<>' hardly 
any demand for any of the folowing 
lines: Heavy copper and wire, 
10 l-4c per pound; light cop- 
per, 9 l-4c per pound; heavy red 
brass, !• l-4c per lb; heavy yellow brass, 
8 to 9c per lb ; light brass, 5 to 5 l-2c 
per lb ; lead, $2.50 per cwt ; scrap zinc, 
3c per lb; iron, No. 1 wrought, $10; No. 
2 wrought, $3; machinery cast scran, 
$13; stoveplate, $10; malleable and steel, 
$4; old rubbers, 5c per lb; country mix- 
ed rags, 65c per 100 lbs. 

PETROLEUM. 

As is usual at this time of year, the 
consumption of petroleum is growing 
less owing to the shorter hours of dark- 
ness now prevailing. All lines except 
Amercan water white have gone down, 
l-2c per lb. We quote: Canadian prime 
white, 18 l-2c; Canadian water white, 
20c; Amen" can prime white, 19c; Ameri- 
can water white, 21 l-2c, ex-warehouse. 

COAL. 

Considerable activity is being ex- 
perienced and prices are firm. We quote: 
Anthracite, $5.25; bituminous for steam 
purposes, $2 to $4, according to quality, 
f.o.b. Buffalo and bridges. 

Hides, Skins and Wool. 

The market is lively this week. Sheep- 
skins have gone up 10c, and pulled 
wools, super, have advanced 2c: per lb. 
Other lines are unchanged. We quote: 

HIDES. 

No. 1 green, per lb 08 

" 2 " " 07 

" 1 " steers, per lb 081 

2 ." 071 

Cured, per lb 08 j 



CALFSKINS. 

Veal ekinB, INo. 1, 6 to « id. inclusive 1' 

2 " " " 09 

' 1 15 to 20 lb " 10 

2 " " 08 

Deacons (dairies), each 65 

Sheepskins 1 00 1 25 

Lamb skins 30 

WOOL. 

Unwashed wool, per lb 094 10 

Fleece wool, new clip, per lb 16 

Pulled wools, super, per lb 18 20} 

extra " 20 22 



TRADE CONDITIONS IN MARITIME 
PROVINCES. 

Special Correspondent of Hardware and Metal. 

Halifax, May 16, 1904. 

SINCE the first of May there has 
been a better feeling in trade cir- 
cles and, although the Spring busi- 
ness was undoubtedly late in starting, 
it will still make a good average. April 
was an extremely dull month, and trad- 
ers were very conservative regarding 
sales, as quite a lot of old accounts 
were outstanding, and in the existing 
state of collections it was not deemed 
advisable to increase these balances. By 
careful nursing on the part of the whole- 
sale houses, the crisis was tided over 
and we are told that a distinct im- 
provement is now noted, payments hav- 
ing been received from rather unexpected 
quarters. The demand for goods has 
kept up and, if wholesalers sold as in- 
discriminately as they did a year ago, 
sales would be much larger than they 
are. There has, however, been a dispo- 
sition to sift accounts, especially from 
the eastern part of the province, and 
numbers who have asked for supplies 
have been written that under present 
conditions they should devote their en- 
ergies more to the collection of accounts 
than the sale of goods. 

It has been a hard Winter for the 
business houses of Cape Breton. The 
smallpox scare practically paralyzed 
business in some sections. This has 
now blown over and with increased ac- 
tivity at the Sydney? better things are 
looked for. 

The management of the Dominion Iron 
& Steel Co. on Friday received orders 
to relight the open hearth furnaces and 
to put the blooming mill on double shift. 
This is taken to mean that the com- 
pany has secured large and important 
contracts for its output of rods and 

billets. 

* # # 

Business is exceptionally brisk oa the 
western shore where there is much ac- 
tivity in the shipyards. The excellent 
prospects for the season's fisheries have 
caused an increased demand for sup- 
plies, and even though all cotton lines 
are much dearer than last year, the 
sales have in no degree been lessened. 
Catches of. fish have so far as reported 




Our Sheet 
Metal Fronts 



Offer you splendid improvement, at 
small cost, for any style of building:. 

We make them complete, to suit 
any sized or shaped structure — the 
entire metal finish including; door and 
window caps, cornices, etc. — in a great 
variety of styles. 

They give a very handsome effect, 
and enduring", practical satisfaction. 

We give estimates if you send 
measurements and outline of the build- 
ing. 

Think it over. 

Metallic Roofing Co., 

Limited. 

Wholesale Manufacturers. 

Toronto, Canada. 



been large and, even though present 
high prices do not hold, there will be a 
large amount of money in circulation in 
the shore towns and villages this sea- 
son. 

• • • 

The Amherst Foundry Co. last week- 
started up an enamelling department, 
which gives employment to fifty ad- 
ditional men. This is the first enamell- 
ing plant in the Maritime Provinces 
and the second one in Canada. It is in 
charge of Mr. Fred Schuller, who has 
had sixteen years experience at the 
business in the United States. The ar- 
ticles turned out consist of bath tubs, 
sinks, preserving kettles and quite an 
extensive line of smallwares. 

s * * 

There have been no changes in local 
quotations since last report. Both lin- 
seed oil and turpentine are unsettled 
but local dealers still adhere to April 
prices. Cordage is firm and unchanged. 
The strike at the Montreal works of the 
Consumers Cordage Co. necessitated the 
filling of some extra orders from the 
plant in this city. Both zinc and tin 
plates are now firmly held. There is a 
good enquiry for haying tools, and there 
is a good movement in builders' materi- 
als as there is a good deal of new work 
now under contract. 



There was lately organized at Port- 
land, Maine, a new company to exploit 
the copper deposits at Six Mile Brook 
in this province. The process of ore- 
reduction will be the newly-patented 
electro-chemical, by which process ores 
of low as well as high grades can be 
treated. The secretary is H. W. Yuill, 
of Truro, and the vice-president J. A. 
Wright is also a resident of that town. 



33 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



May 21, 1904. 



1 v 



BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN BRITISH 
COLUMBIA. 

From the Sncvial Correspondent of Hardware andMbtal 

Vancouver B. C., May 13, 1904. 
HE Boards of Trade of Victoria, 
Vancouver, and other cities of the 
province, have had two very im- 
portant matters before them for the 
past week,— the Mexican steamer service 
and the agitation for the imposition of a 
duty on lumber. The former matter was 
so happily settled by the Dominion 
Government coming to a definite under- 
standing with the representatives from 
President Diaz's Republic, that it did 
not perhaps occupy the same relative 
place in the public interest that it 
should have. However, there was an 
immediate response to the notification 
from Ottawa that there was a move on 
to establish the line. Business men of 
all -classes said at once, "By all means 
let us have the line. It will open up a 
new avenue of reciprocal trade." 

Reference to the duty on lumber is 
made on the editorial page. 

* -X- * 

An interesting arrival from Dawson 
this morning was Mr. Wilson Foster, 
who has devoted his energies for the 
past six years to the development of 
the quartz and mineral propositions in 
the Klondike, while every one else was 
wrapped up in the placer gold claims of 
the creeks of the Klondike. Mr. Foster 
has won the cognomen of the Quartz 
King of the Klondike through his per- 
sistent advocacy of the vast possibilities 
of the working of the enormous deposits 
of low-grade free-milling ore which are 
to be found in all the northern districts. 

But the chief object of Mr. Foster's 
present trip, his first visit to civiliza- 
tion in seven years, is to take to the 
St. Louis Exposition a collection of 
20,000 specimens of all kinds of miner- 
als and quartz, including gold, silver, 
copper, tin, iron and other minerals. He 
has free-milling quartz specimens worth 
hundreds of dollars to the ton, and beau- 
tiful galena carrying gold and silver and 
free copper, and placer copper and tin 
from the creeks of the north, and other 
interesting samples are included. Mr. 
Foster has also between 10,000 and 15,- 
000 specimens of gems found in the 
north, sapphires, black diamonds, rubies, 
moon stones, etc. 

He will exhibit his collection in Van- 
couver and Victoria, then go east to 
Winnipeg and Ottawa, showing it in 
both places and finally proceeding to St. 
Louis. 

His great anxiety is to interest first 
the people of the Dominion in the possi- 
bilities of the quartz mining of the Yu- 
kon, after that he will by his exhibit 



at St. Louis let ■ the world see what 
there is in the north besides the placer 
gold. His exhibit is most certainly a 
valuable as well as an interesting one, 
and his store of information on the 
large deposits of free-milling gold quartz 
and other minerals is inexhaustible. 
That he has the confidence of the resi- 
dents of Dawson is seen from his cre- 
dentials which include letters from Gov- 
ernor Congdon, Judge Craig, Major 
Wood of the N. W. M. P., and Regis- 
trar Girouard of the Dawson Lands 
Titles Office. 

* * » 

A big industry is to be established in 
New Westminster by a number of local 
Vancouver parties, who have secured a 
license for a distillery and have formed 
a company with large capital to erect 
a big plant for the manufacture of 
whisky and other liquors. The distillery 
is to be erected at Sapperton, the east- 
ern extremity of New Westminster City, 
and right on the Fraser River, a site of 
70 acres having been purchased. Work 
is to go ahead on the buildings very 
shortly. W. Braid and R. Kelly, whole- 
sale grocers, are interested, as well as a 
number of other prominent and well-to- 
do citizens. 

*- * * 

The development of the pulp industry 
in this province is apparently to be left 
to American citizens, a concession hav- 
ing been taken up by Seattle business 
men on Bella Coola inlet, for which the 
Government has granted a lease. The 
new company has purchased from Cap- 
tain Troup, superintendent of the C. P. 
R. coast steamship service, a steam 
launch which is to be sent up at once to 
prospect the territory on which the 
lease has been taken. Work on a mill 
is to begin shortlv, so the promoters 
announce. 

Another pulp mill proposition, that of 
the Oriental Power & Pulp Co., at 
Swanson Bay on the mainland opposite 
Princess Royal Island, is also being 
pushed vigorously. This is the first 
company to get started in the way of 
putting up any buildings. A wharf and 
warehouse have already been built and 
it is said that the mill is to be gone on 
with as quickly as possible. A never 
failing supply of water for generating 
power is available. It is estimated at 
a minimum of 15,000 horse power. 
» * • 

The boring for oil at Steveston, on 
the Fraser River, twelve miles from 
Vancouver, is being actively pushed for- 
ward by the Richmond Oil Co., which 
has leases on a large amount of the 
land surrounding the Town of Steves- 
ton. An excellent plant has been in- 
stalled and derrick erected. The capa- 
city of the plant is sufficient to drive a 
34 



twelve inch hole down a thousand feet 
or more. Last week boring operations 
began and by the end of the third day 
the bore-hole was down four hundred 
feet. It, went nearly all the way in 
quicksand after the top soil was passed 
through. One or two layers of blue clay 
were encountered but they did not con- 
tinue for any distance. It is anticipat- 
ed that the well will have to be driven 
at least 1,000 ft. before bedrock is 
reached. The work will take at least 
another week. After that the drilling 
in the rock will, of course, depend en- 
tirely on the nature of the formation. 
From all surface indications, the men in 
charge of the boring, who are experts 
from Beaumont, Texas, oil fields, are 
very sanguine of success. 
• * * 

Local conditions are somewhat de- 
pendent upon the commencement of ac- 
tive northern shipments to enliven trade. 
The wholesale merchants expect that 
with the next trips of the Skagway 
steamers large consignments will go 
north, for the Yukon River navigation 
is practically open. It is not likely 
that there will be any great difference 
in the Dawson business from last sea- 
son, but there is a steady trade and 
regular demand which makes a very nice 
business for local wholesalers, in hard- 
ware as well as in dry goods and gro- 
ceries and provision lines. The demand 
for mining tools and supplies is always 
a steady business. 



Building trades are all extremely ac- 
tive now and there are more blocks and 
houses going up this season than ever. 
The development of the farming districts 
of the Fraser Valley, the lower main- 
land, the interior and the sections on 
Vancouver Island open to settlement is 
very satisfactory this season. Many 
people from eastern Canada and from 
the U. S. have been buying up farming 
lands and fruit lands in the province and 
settling upon them. 



LONDON METAL MARKET. 

From The Metal Market Report May 18. 

Pig Iron— Scotch warrants, Glasgow, 
closed at £52, same as last week. Mid- 
dlesboro No. 3 foundry at £43 6s, a re- 
duction of 17 l-2s in a week. 

Tin— Spot tin opened firm at £125 5s, 
futures at £124 10s, and after sales of 
300 tons of spot and 120 tons of fu- 
tures closed firm at £126 for spot and 
£125 2s 6d for futures, making* price 
as compared with last week 9s higher 
on spot and £1 2s 6d higher on futures. 

Copper — Spot copper opened steady 
at £57, futures £57, and after sales of 
100 tons of spot and 150 tons of futures, 
closed quiet at £57 2s 6d for spot and 
£57 2s 6d for futures, making price as 
compared with a week ago 7s 6d lower 
on spot and Ss 9cl lower on futures. 

Lead— The market closed at £11 16s 
3d, making price as compared with a 
week ago Is 3d lower. 

Spelter— The market closed at £22 2s 
6d, making price as compared with last 
week 2s 6~d lower. 



May 21, 1904. 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



PITTSBURG METAL MARKET. 

From The Iron Trade Review, May 17, 1904. 

WHILE new business in most fin- 
ished lines continues light, and 
specifications pn existing con- 
tracts are by no means heavy, none of 
the local mills have as yet been compell- 
ed to curtail output, although a con- 
tinuation of the present lull will cer- 
tainly result in the light running of 
many mills in the near future. Officials 
of the United States Steel Corporation 
for the present at least do not antici- 
pate curtailing their pie 1 iron produc- 
tion which together with the coke pro- 
duction in the Connellsville region at 
the present time is at its maximum. Pig 
iron centres report lower prices and 
little inclination by consumers to con- 
sider purchases for the third quarter. 
The statistical showing for May 1 was 
unexpectedly good — an increase in pro- 
duction in April of 106,000 tons from 
that of March, accompanied by a de- 
crease in stocks of 14,000 tons. On May 
1 the production of coke and anthracite 
iron was at the rate of 19,000,000 tons 
a year, and all apparently going into 
consumption, though there is, of course, 
the undetermined factor of stocks in 
consumers' hands. Southern iron is 
freely offered at $9.50 for No. 2 foun- 
dry, Birmingham, and sales on an- 
alysis have been at the equivalent 
of $9.25. A Southern Ohio purchase of 
1,000 tons brought out some low prices 
both for northern and southern irons. 
The Bessemer pig iron market is inac- 
tive, and the blowing out of two Central 
Western merchant furnaces this month 
is arranged for, with the expectation 
that further curtailment will come early 
in June. The negotiations for 50,000 
tons of Bessemer iron for the Lake Su- 
perior Co. 's steel plant at Sault Ste. 
Marie, Out., are practically comnleted, 
but none of the iron will come from 
Lower Lake furnaces. The company is 
also reported in the market for a large 
tonnage of coke. 

Pig Iron— Owing to the few transac- 
tions the quotations on nearlv all grades 
are practically nominal. On No. 2 
foundry the outside price is $13.35, 
while Valley furnaces would no doubt 
do $12.25 at the furnace on a desirable 
tonnage. There is no demand for Bes- 
semer iron and quotations are nominal- 
ly $13.35, Pittsburg. This price could 
also be shaded materially on a desirable 
order. Southern No. 2 is being offered 
here at $9.50 Birmingham or ^13.85 de- 
livered, but no sales are reported. On 



Northern forge $12.75, Pittsburg, can he 
readily done. According to information 
at hand at present four active Valley 
stacks will be on the idle list within the 
next two weeks and other Valley slacks 
will follow early in June. On the other 
hand, (here is no indication that the 
United States Steel Corporation will 
curtail production in the near future, 
the blowing out of the Neville Island 
furnace being offset by the blowing in 
of furnace No. 3 at Youngstown. We 
revise quotations as follows: 

Bessemer, Valley $12 40 to $12 50 

Bessemer, Pittsburg 13 25 to 13 35 

No. 1 Foundry 13 60 to 13 75 

No. 2 Foundry 13 25 to 13 35 

Grav torge, Pittsburg 12 75 

Chilled basic, Valley 12 40 to 12 50 

Chilled basic, Pittsburg 13 25 to 13 35 

Steel — Agreed quotations continue to 
be shaded on offers of both open-hearth 
and Bessemer billets and sheet bars. 
The large steel producers are, however, 
maintaining agreed prices, but no large 
tonnages have been recently offered 
which would invite any shading on the 
part of the largest producers. Agreed 
prices which are being shaded from 50c 
to $1 per ton are as follows : Bessemer 
and open-hearth billets, 4x4 inches and' 
slabs, up to and including 0.25 carbon, 
$23 Pittsburg, Wheeling, Valley, Johns- 
town, Ashland, Ky., Ironton, O. and 
Lorain, 0.; 0.26 and including 0.60 
carbon, $1 advance; and 0.61 to 1.00 
carbon, $2 advance. Billets smaller than 
3 7-8 inches and sheets and tin bars are 
$1 per ton extra . Bessemer and open- 
hearth rods are still quoted at $30 to 
$31 Pittsburg. 

Structural Material— The reports that 
the export department of the United 
States Steel Corporation has received 
the order for steel for the Montreal 
wharves is denied. The order has not 
yet been placed. It calls for about 
20.000 tons of material. The general 
contract for the erection of the sheds 
on the wharves, as noted last week, has 
been placed, hut the steel work has no) 
yet been sublet. On Thursday the 
Wabash railroad will onon bids for the 
erection of its elevated tracks on the 
south side, reauiring about 5.000 tons of 
structural material. The order for the 
structural work for the thirtv-eisht 
warehouses on the Monongrahela calling' 
for 12.000 tons, has alreadv been let. 
Quotations remain unchanged: Beams 
and channels, 3 to 15 inches. 1.60c; 18 
to 24 inches, 1.70c: tees. 1.65c: zees. 
1.60c: angles, from 3 to 16 inches, 1.60c; 
universal mill whites, 1.60c. 

Bars— New business is light, while 
specifications on old contracts are not 
nearly what is expected at this season 
of the year. We make the following 
quotations: Bar iron. 1.35c to 1.40c 
Pittsburg, for local deliverv. while for 
western shipment ouotations are based 
on 1.25c to 1.30c Pittsburg. Hoops are 
held at 1.40c base, and bands at 1.35c 
taking' bar extras. Bessemer steel bars 

35 



1.35c, net; channels, angles, zees and 
tees, Bessemer, under 3 inches, 1.4V. 
The. following differentials are maintain- 
ed on steel: Less than 2,000 Mounds of 
a size and not less than 1,000 pounds, 
10 cents advance; less than 1,00(1 
pounds of a size, 30 cents advance. 

Wire and Wire Nails-New business 
is not nearly as heavy as earlier in the 
year and when present orders are filled 
many of the local mills will curtail pro- 
duction to some extent until the middle 
of (he year, when a number will shut 
down which is done every year. A 
meeting of the Cut Nail' Association 
will be held on Thursday, but no change 
in prices is expected. Quotations are 
unchanged: Wire nails, carload lots to 
jobbers, f.o.b. cars Pittsburg, are 
quoted $1.90 base; plain wire, carload 
lots, $1.80 base; barb wire, carload lots, 
$2.20 base; staples, carload lots, $2.05 
keg. Galvanized, 30c extra. Carload 
lots to retailers are held at 5c advance 
in all lines, and on less than carload 
lots a further advance of 10c is charged. 
Steel and iron cut nails, carload lots, 
$1.75, and less than carload lots, $1.80 
f.o.b. Pittsburg-, plus freight to points 
of destination. Terms, 60 days, less 2 
per cent, off in 10 days. 

Merchant Steel— Some business is be- 
ing closed for delivery after July 1, but 
on the whole the market is quiet. We 
make the following quotations: Tot- 
calk, 1.90c; carriage spring steel, 1.75c; 
tire steel, 1.65c; plow steel, 6 inches 
and under, 1.40c for Bessemer and 1.45c 
for open-hearth; plow slabs, 1-4 inch 
and heavier, 1.65c. The demand for 
shafting on the part of the machinery 
manufacturers is not heavy, and tonnage 
has therefore been considerably affect- 
ed. Drawn and cold rolled shafting is 
held at 52 per cent, off in carload lots 
and 47 off in less than carloads. 

Pipes and Tubes— Demand for all 
kinds of material continues good, espe- 
cially line pipe. 

Coke— The H. 0. Frick Co. is not cur- 
tailing production. 82 per cent, of its 
ovens in the upper and lower Connells- 
ville field being in operation at pres- 
ent, and from all indications will con- 
tinue to operate until July. On the 
other hand, a number of smaller oper- 
ators are preparing to shut down owing 
to the low prices that are ruling and 
which net them no profit. Furnace coke 
is held at $1.45 to $1.50, and foundry 
at $1.90 to $2. A few grades of foundry 
coke still command from $2.25 to $2.50. 

Coal— The coal market in this dis- 
trict is badly demoralized owing to the 
non-shipment of coal from lower lake 
docks. Pun of mine Pittsburg vein coal 
has sold during the week at prices rang- 
ing from 90c to $1 a ton, while excellent 
gas coal in the Connellsville region has 
been offered at 85 to 90c. These are 
the lowest prices that have been ruling 
on coal since the organization of the 
Pittsburg Coal Co. .and it is generally 
believed that the low prices will only 
rule temporarily and that they will 
again advance as soon as the lake ship- 
ni( nts commence. 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



May 21, 1904. 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word first 
insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
81.000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In nocasecanthisrulebeoverlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



BUSINESS FOR SALE. 



FOR SALE— Good harness business — Sales over 
four thousand last year; population four 
thousand; nearest opposition seven miles. Apply 
C. Parsons & Son, 79 Front street east, Toronto. 

(0 



HARDWARE and tinware business for sale, in 
one of the best business towns in Ontario; 
stock about $1,200; rent low and dwelling in con- 
nection; business capable of expansion; good 
opening for a practical tinsmith and hardware- 
man. For full particulars address Box 133, 
Hardware and Metal. (22) 



HARDWARE BUSINESS— About $4,000, in 
largest mining town in New Ontario. For 
particulars address Home & Hardy, Copper 
Cliff. (24) 



IMMEDIATELY — Second-hand planer and 
' matcher; iron frame; able to dress 12-in. 
thick ; must be in first. class repair and cheap ; 
give full particulars. Hamilton Bros., Glen 
Huron, Ont. 



AGENCY WANTED. 



A YOUNG man experienced in the hardware 
business wishes to hear of some eastern 
manufacturer wanting a representative in the 
hardware line for British Columbia; reference 
given. Address P. O. Box, 357, Vancouver, B. C. 

(21) 



CANADIAN manufacturers desirous of being 
well represented in B.C., the Yukon and 
Alberta and open to exploit the oriental markets 
are invited to communicate. We know the terri- 
tory. Have you the goods ? Hardware, Box 
367, Vancouver. (21) 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



BOILERMAKER — Permanent position on new 
work for good all-round man; must be sober 
and steady; state wages and experience. Madden 
Bros., Simcoe. (f) 



CARRIAGE PAINTER-State experience and 
wages wanted. Apply to the Finnegan Car- 
riage Co., Belleville, Ont. ({) 



HARDWARE salesman; steady job; state ex- 
perience; salary and reference. R. E. 
Walker, Caledonia, Ont. (21) 



PLUMBER WANTED— Apply to Stevenson & 
Malcolm Co., Guelph, Ont. (f) 



TWO good tinsmiths wanted — None but first- 
class men need apply; wages $3.50 a day; 
steady work to competent men. Apply to G. W. 
Gray, Lethbridge. Alta. (f) 



HARDWARE CONDITIONS IN MANITOBA. 



TRADE throughout the country con- 
tinues rather quiet, but in the 
city all round business is report- 
ed by the jobbers as being- quite satis- 
factory under the prevailing circum- 
stances. Better prospects in the country 

are anticipated in the near future. 

* * * 

The International Harvester Co. have 
plans out for the erection of a four- 
storey warehouse, which will be the sec- 
ond largest building to be put up this 
season. The site decided on for this 
massive structure will be on the corner 

of Main and Sutherland streets. 
• * * 

The market holds the price list the 
same as was quoted last week. 

We quote : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb $3 15 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 3 39 

9 250 

Plain galvanized 10 3 50 

12 3 10 

13 3 20 

H 3 9° 

*S 4 45 

16 4 60 

Plain twist 3 15 

Staples 3 65 

Oiled annealed wire 10 3 42 

" 3 48 

12 356 

13 3 66 

14 3 76 

IS 3 91 

Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

Horsenails, 40 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. q to No 1 . . . $4 75 

No. 2 and larger .... 4 45 

Snow shoes, No. o to No .1 4 60 

No. 2 and larger 4 45 

4 45 



Steel, No. o to No. 1. 



No. 2 and larger. 



4 20 



Cut Nails— 

2d 1 in $\ 10 

3d Fin. lYt in.. 4 io 

3d 1 X in 3 75 

4d 1 % in 3 50 

5d 1 X >n 3 5° 

6d 2 in 3 40 

8d 2% in 3 25 

iod 3 in 3 20 

20d 4 in 3 15 

30d 4K in 3 10 

40d 5 in 3 10 

Sod sK in 3 10 

6od 6 in 3 10 



Wire Nails — 



1 in... 
i'A in. 
iX " 
iH " 
iX " 

2 " 
2% " 

3 " 
3X " 

4 " 
4X " 

5 " 
$X " 

6 " 



Bar iron (basis) 

Swedish iron (basis) 

Sleigh shoe steel , , 

Spring steel 

Machinery steel ,. 

Tool steel. Black Diamond, ioolb , 

Jessop '. 

Sheet iron, black, 10 to 16 gauge, 100 lb. 

18 to 22 gauge 

24 gauge 

26 gauge 

gauge 

Galvanized Iron, Apollo, .16 gauge .... 

18 and 20 gauge 

22 and 24 gauge 

26 gauge English or 28 American . . 

28 gauge 

30 gauge or 10K oz 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 

\ 3G 



4 15 


4 10 


3 70 


3 5° 


3 5° 


3 4° 


3 25 


3 20 


3 15 


3 10 


3 10 


3 10 


3 10 


3 10 


2 50 


4 75 


2 85 


3 25 


3 50 


8 50 


13 00 


3 5° 


3 75 


3 9° 


4 00 


4 10 


4 00 


4 00 


4 25 


4 25 


4 5° 


4 75 



Office of Hardware and Metal 

Room 308 Mclntyre Block, 

- Winnipeg, May 19, 1904. 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 4 25 

26 gauge 4 50 

2? " 4 75 

Extra sheets, 36-in. wide, an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 

Genuine Russian, per lb 11 

Imitation " " 07 to 08 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 8 00 

26gauge 850 

Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20x28, box .... 9 50 

" IX 11 50 

IXX " 1350 

Ingot tin 35 

Canada plate, 18 x 21, 18x24 and 20x28. 3 00 

Canada plate, full polished 3 15 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 7 00 

Broken lots 7 5° 

Pig lead, 100 lb 5 50 

Black iron pipe, Y» inch 3 3° 

X " 3 3° 

H 3 4° 

X " 375 

Black iron pipe, % inch 4 30 

1 " 6 25 

i* " 875 

iX 10 50 

2 " 14 5° 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis 11 75 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 25 

Lathyarn 1 1 25 

Solder 20 

Axes, chopping $ 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Bluestone 5 25 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 8op.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coach 70 p.c. 

Bolts, carriage, 3-16 and Jf 60 p.c. 

5-16 and H 55 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and up 55 p.c. 

Bolts, machine, H and under 50 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and over 55 and 5 p.c. 

Bolts, tire 60 and 5 p.c. 

Bolt ends 55 and 5 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe bolts 70 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts 55 and 5 p.c. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

" " small lots 2jic. " 

Hex " case lots 3c. " 

" smaller lots 2j£c. " 

Rivets, iron , 50 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

" No. 12 36 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch 9H 

X inch 7 fi 

S-16 inch 5Ji 

Hinch 5H 

7-16 inch 4^ 

% inch 4H 

Vt and Yi inch 4 

Spades and shovels .....40 and 5 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 p.c. 

Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. . $3 15 

No. 1 1 go 

No. 2 1 60 

Octagon extra 2 30 

No. 1 1 60 

Files common 70 and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 p.c. 

Building paper : 

Anchor, plain 65c. 

" tarred 70c. 

Pure fibre, plain 6754c. 

" " tarred 80c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

" military.... . 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F, military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley'ssoft, 12 gauge black 15 00 

chilled, 12 gauge 16 00 

soft, 10 gauge 18 00 

chilled, 10 gauge 19 00 



May 21, 1904. 

Shot, Ordinary, per ioo lb 6 <x> 

Chilled : 6 so 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 °° 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

" " plain 75 and 2H p.c 

" pieced 

Japanned ware 37 H P-c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 P- c - 

Famous 50 and 10 p.c. 

" Imperial 50 and 10 od 

Green Wire Cloth 1 55 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 27&C. 

Prime white American 25 54c. 

Water white Canadian 25 % c. 

Prime white Canadian 24 % c. 

SCRAP. 

No. 1 cast iron $14 to J 5 

No. 2 " 7 

Wrought iron scrap 5 

Copper (heavy) 8Hc. per lb. 

Yellow brass (heavy) 7J<c. 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 2c. to 254c ' 

Zinc scrap ic. 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

White lead $6 oo to $6 50 

Putty in bladder, 2 'A lb., in keg of 100 lbs. o 02K 
Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ o 97 

Less than barrel lots 1 02 

Linseed oil, raw 052 

Boiled 055 

WINDOW GLASS. 

Single 1st break, up to 25 miled inches, $3.50; 26 
to 40, $3.75; 41 to 50, I4.25; 51 to 60, $4.75; 61 to 
70, $5.25, in 100-ft. boxes. 

Lubricating oils, heavy castor machine. ... o 29 

" extra engine 027 

" dynamo o 35 

" black o 22 

" cylinder $0 50 to o 75 

(as to quality) 

Harness oil o 50 to o 60 

Neatsfoot oil 1 00 

Vegetable oil, 1st pressure 1 00 % 

" 2ndpressure 1 09H 



TUB MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. Aimer Gram, formerly of S. A. 
Crawford's hardware store, St. Thomas, 
Out., has accepted a position at Wright 
& Sou's store, Glencoe, Ont. Mr. Gram 
lias had several years' experience in the 
hardware business and comes highly re- 
commended. 

Mr. H. G. Allen, representing the 
Oneida Community, Limited, Niagara, 
has recently returned from a business 
trip to Manitoba, Northwest Territories 
and British Columbia. Mr. Allen found 
business exceedingly good in the North- 
west, as well as on the Pacific coast. 
"Trade is rushing in Winnipeg'," he 
said, ' ' and I found that at Vancouver 
it was very much better than at the 
same time last year. In fact, through- 
out British Columbia trade is better 
than it was when I was there last 
year. ' ' Speaking of Winnipeg, he said : 
"It will be the Chicago of Canada. 
There is no doubt about it. Its growth 
is simply wondrous.''' 



"New Macassa" Cook 




A GUARANTEE BOND IS ^E-NT 26 W0o$ 



WITH EACH STOV 



4-Hole Coal or Wood Cook 

Steel Oven Bottom 



RfTURNtftet Shaking Grate 



F"P CiO -iM?^ 6 // 1 *' ie fo ur -hole size, just the thing 
small kitchen and light house- 
/~\ ^*^__ keeping. Will burn coal 

s=u;c T^<j^i v ' ° r wood 



THE D. MOORE ctftftffflY, HAMILTON 



MANITOBA DEPOT. 



ii in ■ — ■Mi ay 



MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., 

117 Bannatyne St. East, Winnipeg 

WRITE US FOR PRICES. 




MANUFACTURED BY 



G. F. STEPHENS & CO., LIMITED 



WINNIPEG. CANADA. 



Hardware and Metal 



May 21, 1904. 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



"An English Colorman's Impressions." 
HE interview under the heading 

T"An English Colorman's Impres- 
sions," which appeared in the 
last issue of Hardware and Metal, has 
created no little interest, and some 
comments by a Canadian colorman are 
in order. Mr. Storer mentions that on 
his arrival in Bombay he was greeted 
with bduquets, and a fine wreath of 
flowers was placed around his neck. Mr. 
Storer is a Scotchman. Did the band 
play Annie Laurie ? Mr. Storer says 
this reception was somewhat different 
from what a traveler might expect in a 
country like Canada. Yes, in Canada 
colormen are sometimes received with a 
"frost," which is so severe as to con- 
geal the air all round and almost bring 
on a snow storm. One hardware travel- 
er used to be bombarded in a town be- 
tween Stratford and Goderich with so 
many stale chestnuts that he was 
obliged to cut the town out from his 
route. 



The interview emphasizes the import- 
ance of brands, mentioning the bird 
"Liver" with a leaf in its mouth — this 
bird being now as extinct as the dodo. 
At least one cynic thought that Liver — 
pool took its name not from the liver, 
but from the fact that- a great many 
cattle were killed there. From this, he 
thought, came the use of the word de- 
picting that part of the anatomy usual- 
ly associated with biliousness. 

To come back to the question of 
brands. In India, the elephant is the 
sacred animal and red the sacred color, 
and whenever a native on the Seringa- 
patam and Chillingawallabadoree Rail- 
way sees a keg of genuine "Elephant" 
red lead he immediately prostrates him- 
self, exclaiming, "Allah is Great; Praise 
be to Allah." It is thought that when 
the "Sun" varnish permeates the dis- 
trict populated by the Parsees they will 
reverence the brand immediately. 

Sometimes, however, a brand is a 
drawback. For instance, last Winter 



the "Lion" brand of canned meats was 
sent up to a lumber camp in British 
Columbia. The natives positively re- 
fused to have anything to do with it. 
Never having been to the zoological gar- 
dens or Forepaugh's menagerie Rain-in- 
the-Face and his fellow braves evidently 
took the picture of the lion for a canine, 
and exclaimed, "Me no si wash (coast) 
Indian. Me no eat dog." Half the 
shipment of canned meat, therefore, had 
to be thrown out. 



Strike Over in Montreal. 
The strike of the painters and decor- 
ators of Montreal was declared "off" 
early in the week, and the men are now 
back at work. The strike at no time 
completely tied up business in Mont- 
real, but it was, of course, an incon- 
venience, and it embarrassed the retail 
trade to some extent. Paint dealers are 
not sorry it is over. 



Memorial Windows 

UNEXCELLED 
DOMESTIC ART GLASS 

H. E. St. Geor ge, London, 0n j._. 





THE SPRAMOTOR 

18 recognized by the users as the most durable and 
efficient apparatus yet invented, for the 

Prevention of blight and bugs on fruit and potatoes. 

For the destruction of wild mustard in the grain 
cropB without injury to the grain, and for 

The painting of buildings. 

Has been awarded First Place by the Canadian Gov- 
erment in actual contest, and 

The Gold Medal at the Pan-American. 

The Trade fully protected. 

Write for particulars and discounts. Terms liberal. 

THE SPRAMOTOR CO., 

68-70 King St.. 



LONDON, CAN. 



R.EKA 
OCHRE 




Ground in Refined 
Linseed Oil. . . 



For fineness of texture and strength of tinting qualities, 
it is in a class by itself. 

A rich chromy shade for less price than ordinary yellow 
ochre will cost you. 

It is one of our rapid sellers and will e the si me w ith 
you. Mailing sample free on application. 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY 

The Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 



LIMITED, 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA. 



38 



May 21, 190!. 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH trades 



hardware and Metal 



a 



LINSEED OIL 



Raw and Boiled 



GUARANTEED PURE" 



MANUrACTLRID BY 



Canada Linseed Oil Mills 



MONTREAL 



LIMITED, 



esr BARRELS WANTED!! 

We are open to buy good, sound, oak 

Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Varnish, and 
Machine Oil Barrels. 




rthur. Corneille & Co. 

MONTREAL 

Glue and Gelatine 

An extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF . 



^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN OANADA 



For the GENUINE 

Imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS St CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention Hardware and Metal when writing. 




Paint of Quality 

Don't recommend a paint to your customers un- 
less you know that the quality of it is lasting 
and the color right. By selling a paint of proved 
merit you will secure the confidence of your 
trade — increase sales. 



STERLING PAINTS 



for outside or interior work — guaranteed right everyway. 
— do not lose lustre — defy the sun's heat — won't blister. 



Are fast colors 



WRITE FOR PRICE LISTS AND CATALOGUE. 



CANADIAN OIL COY, Limited 



Head Office: front and Scott Street* 



TORONTO. 



39 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



May 21, 1904. 



* 



Paint and Oil MarKets 



t 



Quebec. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, May 2J, 1904. 

HEAVY shipments of lead products, 
such as dry white lead, dry red 
lead, litharge and orange mineral, 
have been coming forward, and man y 
back orders have been cleared up. Be- 
fore these goods arrived the market was 
exceedingly bare. No change has been 
made in quotations for these staples and 
it is satisfactory to note that stocks 
will now be ample to meet all require- 
ments. One of the features of the week 
has been the call for Paris green, 
chiefly, however, for the shipment of 
green already booked. Importers and 
makers have been cautious in stocking 
up this article, and it is well for the 
hardware trade not to be too confident 
of the jobbers having ample stocks when 
the season is in full swing. Ground white 
lead is moving fairly well, and all 
painters' sundries, such as stains, dry 
colors, tillers, coach colors and varnishes 
are actively enquired for. Quotations 
continue remarkably steady and a fair 
movement in all branches has been re- 
corded. We quote: 

Ground White Lead— Best brands, 
Government standard, $4.50; No. 1 
$4.25 to $4.40; No. 2, $4 to $4.10; No. 
3, $3,671-2 to $3,771-2; No. 4, $3.30 
to $3.40, all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead— $4.25 in casks, and 
in kegs $4.50. 

Dry White Zinc— Pure dry, in casks, 
61-4c; in 100-lb kegs, 6 3-4c; No. 1, 
zinc, in casks, 5 l-4c ; in 100-lb kegs, 
5 3-4c. 

White Zinc— (ground in oil)— Pure, 
25-lb irons, 8c; No. 1, 7c; No. 2, 6c. 

Putty— Bulk, in barrels, $1.50; in 25- 
lb tins and irons, $1.80; bladdered putty 
in barrels, $1.75. 

Orange Mineral— Casks, 7c; 100-lb 
kegs, 71-4c; smaller quantities, 81-4c. 

Red Lead— Genuine red lead, in 
casks, $4.25; in 100-lb kegs, $4.50; in 
less quantities, $5.50 per 100 lb. No. 
1 red lead, casks, $3; kegs, $4.25, and 
smaller quantities, $5.25. 

Litharge— Ground, casks, 5c; in less 
quantities, 51-2c; flake litharge, casks, 
$5; smalls, $5.50 per 100 lb. 



Turpentine— Single barrels, 84 l-2c to 
85c per gallon ; 2 to 4 barrels, 83 1-2 to 
84c per gallon. Standard gallons of 8.6 
pounds. The difference in quotations is 
due to different terms of payment. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 43c; 
5 to 9 barrels, 42c ; boiled, 1 to 4 bar- 
rels, 46c; 5 to 9 barrels, 45c. Delivered 
in Ontario between Montreal and Osh- 
awa at 2c per gallon advance. 

Shellac Varnish— Pure white, $2.85 to 
$3.50; pure orange, $2.75 to $3.40; No. 
1 orange shellac, $2.45 to $2.60. 

Mixed Paints— $1.20 to $1.40 per gal- 
lon. 

Castor Oil— 8 3-4 to 91-4c in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c additional for small 
lots. 

Canadian Paris Green — Barrels, 
14 l-4c ; arsenic kegs, 14 l-2c ; 50 and 
100 lb drums, 15c ; 25-lb drums, 15 l-4c ; 
1-lb packages, 16c; 1-2-lb packages, 
18c; 1-lb tins, 17c. Terms 2 per cent, 
discount for cash in 30 days or 90 days 
net. 

English Paris Green— Barrels, 141-4c; 
arsenic kegs, 141-2c; 50 and 100 lb 
drums, 15c per lb ; 25 lb drums, 15 l-2c ; 
1-lb paper boxes, 16c; 1-lb tin boxes, 
17c. Terms, 2 per cent. 30 days; 90 

days net. 



Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front street east, 

Toronto, May 21, 1904 

ACTIVITY continues to increase in 
practically all lines. The move- 
ment of prepared paints, varnishes, 
white lead and sundries continues ex- 
cellent, while the requests for quick de- 
livery of putty, Paris green, etc., are 
numerous. Turpentine quotations are 
conflicting, ranging all the way from 81 
to about 82 3-4c net. A decline of 5c 
throughout is noted in putty, while Paris 
green is now l-2c higher. Other lines 
are unchanged. The linseed oil market, 
though unchanged, is being carefully 
watched, as its stability now depends on 
the English market, which is far from 
buoyant. We quote : 

White Lead— Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, $4.65; No. 1, $4.20; No. 2, $3.90; 
No. 3, $3.50; No. 4, $3.25 in packages 
of 25 lb and upAvards; l-2e per lb extra 
will be charged for 12 1-2-lb packages ; 
genuine dry white lead, in casks, $4.50. 

Red Lead — Genuine in casks of 560 
lb, $4.25; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb, 
$4.50; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb, $3.75 
to $4; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb, $4.25. 

White Zinc— Genuine, French V.M., 
in casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, 
$6 to $6.25. 

Shingle Stain— In 5-gallon lots, 60 to 
85c per gallon. 

Paris White— 90c to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting— 60 to 65c per 100 lb; Gild- 
ers' whiting, 75c. 

Shellac— Pure orange, in barrels, 
$2.50 to $3; white, $2.50 per gallon; 
No. 1, $2,371-2, including price of can. 




ANCHOR and 

ENGLISH 

LIQUID PAINTS 

occupy a unique position among the different 
brands upon the Canadian market. They 
stand alone at the top, unrivalled for cover- 
ing power, permanency of color, and wear- 
ing qualities. The only white lead used in 
their manufacture is the best the world can 
produce — Brandram s B. B. Genuine. 



HENDERSON & POTTS, Limited, Halifax. 
HENDERSON & POTTS CO., Limited, Hontreal. 




40 



May 21, 1904. 

R.E.THORNE, 



768 Craigr St., 
MONTREAL 



Wholesale Agent and Importer 

Dry Colors, Ochres, Bronze Powders, 
Aluminum Powder, Schlag Metal, 
Bronze Liquids and Varnishes. 

Toronto Office— 29 Mellnda St. 



Manufac urers and Handlers of Oils, Faints, 
Varnish, Soap. Chemicals, Drysalteries, etc, 
throughout the Dominion, should see 

THE OIL HID COLOURMAN S JOURNAL 

the bristling British weekly paper for these trades. 

Subscription. $2.00 per year from date. 
Sample for 10 cents. 

SCOTT, GREENWOOD & CO. 

19 LUDOATE HILL - LONDON, ENO. 



The QviicKest 
Selling Metal Polish 

is the usual remark of the trade 
when you ask them about 

SOLARINE 

It satisfies or your money back. 
Write for sample order. 




SOLARINE DEPOT, TORONTO. 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 

McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 



Hardware and Metal 



Manufacturers 
II 



RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 
HIGH GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES. 

MONTREAL. 



ABOUT GLUES 



What kinds do you handle ? 
Are you and your customers 

satisfied ? Perhaps we can 

give you a better article at a fairer figure. Our SCOTCH GLUES will be found 
of exceptional strength, and equal to many glues for which much higher prices 
are charged. Let us send samples. 

QROVE CHEMICAL CO LTD., Appley Bridge, Lancashire, Eng. 




MARK 



Wobles 8f Hoare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 



Manufacturers oi 



HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the -works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada 




We Pay the 

Extra Freight 



Our Toronto orders are being filled 
Promptly from Montreal and we are 
paying the extra freight charges. 



TEMPORARY TORONTO PREMISES AT 23 SCOTT ST. 



P. D. DODS &. CO., Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver 



GRAPHITE PAINT 



-This paint is exceedingly durable, possessing great 
resistant qualities to Acids, Alkalies, Sulphur 
or Chemical Fumes, Gases, Salt Water or 
Air, and the Extremes of Heat and Cold. Most desirable for painting Iron and Wooden Bridges, Freight Sheds 
or Cars, Elevators, Tanks, Roofs (iron or shingle), Boilers, Steamboats, Barges, or any metal or wooden surface 

where exposure is great, and where an exceedingly durable paint is required. Possesses great covering capacity. 
In Paste form, ground in refined Linseed Oil, four shades, bbls., % bbls., kegs, 25 lb. tins. 



In Liquid form, mixed ready for use, bbls., % bbls., gal. cans. 



SEND FOR QUOTATIONS 



STANDARD PAINT & VARNISH CO., Limited 

WINDSOR, ONTARIO. 



41 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



May 21, 1904. 



THE 



CANADA 
PAINT 

COMPANY 



LTD 



FLOOR 
PAINTS 



To paint your Floors, Verandahs, 
Steps and Stairs with THE CAN- 
ADA PAINT COMPANY'S speci- 
ally-prepared floor paint should be 
a pleasant pastime. It is ground 
so smoothly and works so freely 
that good results are bound to fol- 
low. Write for color cards showing 
shades of 

The Canada Paint 
Company's 

FLOOR PAINT. 



THE 

CANADA 
PAINT 

COMPANY 



LTD 



Linseed Oil — Our quotation is: Raw, 

1 to 4 bbls, 43c ; boiled, 4b'c ; 5 to 9 
bbls, raw, 42c ; boiled, 45c, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, Elora and Guelph, 
net 30 days. Advance of 2c for deliv- 
ery to outside points. Another quota- 
tion is: Raw, 1 to 4 bbls, 43c; boiled, 
46c; 5 to 9 bbls, 42c; boiled, 45c; 10 
barrels and over open, ex-Toronto, 2 
per cent, off 30 days. 

Turpentine— Single bbls, 81 to 83c; 

2 to 4 bbls, 80 to 82c; 5 bbls and over, 
open, Toronto, Hamilton, London, net 
30 davs. Another quotation is: Single 
bbls, 84 1-2c; 2 to 4 bbls, 83 l-2c; 
5 bbls, and over, open ex-To- 
ronto with 2 per cent, off 30 days. 
For less quantities than barrels, 5c per 
gallon extra will be added, and for 5- 
gallon packages, 50c and 10-gallon pack- 
ages 80c will be charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200-lb bbls, 
8 to 8 l-2c per lb; cabinet glue, in bbls, 
11 1-2 to 12c ; emery glue, in bbls, 17c ; 
bookbinders', ground, 101-2c; finest 
American, white, 19c; No. 1 American 
white, 15c per lb. 

Putty — Common, $1.65; pure (linseed 
oil) bladders in barrels, $1.70; bladders, 
in 100-lb kegs, $1.85; bulk in barrels, 
$1.45; bulk, less than barrels and up to 
100-lb., $1.70. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2 
per bbl. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.40 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 55 to 70c per gallon. 

Bridge Paints— 75c to $1. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 71-2 to 
8c per pound, and 8 1-2 to 9c for single 
tins. 

English Paris Green — Petroleum 
bbls, 131-4c; arsenic kegs, 131-2c; 50 
to 100-lb drums, 14c; 1-lb packages, 
15c; 1-lb tins, 16c; 1-2-lb tins, 18c. 

Canadian Paris Green (present deliv- 
ery)— Petroleum bbls, 13 3-4c; arsenic 
kegs, 14c; 50 and 100-lb drums, 14 l-2c; 
1-2-lb tins, 18 l-2c. 



Window Glass. 

MONTREAL. 

Window Glass — There is an active 
trade this week at the following un- 
changed prices : First break, 50 feet, 
$1.70; second break, $1.80 for 50 feet. 
First break, 100 feet, $3.25; second 
break, $3.45; third break, $3.95; fourth 
break, $4.20. 

TORONTO. 

A good movement in all kinds of 
window, plate and ornamental glass is 
reported. Prices are nominally unchang- 
ed, but cutting is still common. Prices 
are nominally as follows: Star, first 
break at $3.30 per 100 feet and Double 
Diamond, first break, at $5.10. Dis- 
count, 15 and 20 per cent. 

43 



Trade Enquiries 



Hardware and Metal will be pleased at aDy time to 
open its columns for trade enquiries relating to the hard- 
ware, metal, machinery or paint trades. Address enquiries 
to the Toronto Editor. 

Canadian Agent Wanted. 
An English firm, manufacturers of a 
brand of enamel, desire to appoint Can- 
adian agents in Canada. This line 
should have a good sale in Canada. 
Further information will be supplied on 
enquiry to Toronto Editor, Hardware 
and Metal. 



Government Enquiries. 

The names of the firms making these enquiries, together 
with their addresses, may be obtained from the Department 
of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, by quoting office under 
which the enquiry appears and giving number. 

FROM HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR CANADA. 

61. A firm engaged in the purchase of 
old iron and steel, etc., have asked to be 
referred to parties in Canada likely to 
have supplies of scrap metals for dis- 
posal. 

62. A Dutch manufacturer of house- 
hold and toilet soaps desires to get into 
communication with Canadian import- 
ers of these articles. 

64. A motor and dynamo manufac- 
turer is looking out for a good firm or 
properly qualified individual to repre- 
sent him in Canada. 

67. Inquiry is made for Canadian quo- 
tations for 30-inch and 36-inch hickory 
pick shafts; also for hammer handles 
and ash broom handles. 

CURATOR, CANADIAN SEC. IMPERIAL 

INSTITUTE. 

35. The manufacturer of a patented 
sack filling and weighing machine and 
sack stand asks to be placed in touch 
with responsible Canadian firm in a 
position to introduce and push the 
goods. 

36. A firm of merchants and engineers 
wishes to appoint suitable Canadian re- 
sident representative for the sale of 
heavy hardware, metals, wire fencing 
and sundry specialties. 

37. A manufacturer of iron water closet 
flushing cisterns wishes to secure a 
share of Canadian trade. 

38. The manufacturers of wire ropes of 
various kinds wish to do business in 
Canada. 

40. A correspondent in Northampton 
would like to secure the agency of a 
first-class Canadian manufacturer of 
leather. 

AGENT AT LEEDS AND HULL, ENGLAND. 

16. Quarry wish to ship grindstones 
of different sizes to Canada. 



May 21, 1904. 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 




CONSTRUCTION vs. DESTRUCTION. 

CARE vs. CARELESSNESS. 

BEST MATERIAL vs. POOR MATERIAL 

REX FLINTKOTE ROOFING vs. ALL OTHER ROOFINC. 

ReX ^ircfckote ^RoofiRff 

"Vrade mark Q/ 

The above tells the whole story, and means to the dealer a quick -selling, business- 
bringing roofing vs. the ordinary kind that never sells, because people don't want it, 
and when they are persuaded to try it never come back again. Tf you want satisfied 
customers for roofing, you should write us to-dav about Rex Flintkote Roofing. 
J. A. & W. BIRD & CO., 49 India Street, Boston, Mass. 



JACK SCREWS 

We are being undersold by American 
machine-made goods which do hot com- 
pare with our Lathe-cut Threads, Solid 
Heads and heavy Bell Bottoms. 
Our screws will carry 50% heavier loads. 
Do not go past us. 

THE H. R. IVES CO., MONTREAL 



NOT IN THE COMBINE 

Ask for Prices of 

Shovels, Spades, Scoops, Etc. 

WE HAVE A LARGE STOCK. 

CANADA HARDWARE CO., Limited, Montreal 



Show These 
to Your 

Customers. 



BEVEL 

PLATE 

DOOR ™° 

WINDOW 

PANELS 




&-m 



LUXEER 
WINDOW 
PRISMS 



L * a7 *W: 




LUXEER-^? 9 
SIDEWALK 
PRISMS 







3 feet Square j STANDARD SIDEWALK PRISMS 

4 feet Square J IN STOCK. 

LUXFER PRISM CO., 

100 King St. W., TORONTO. 




G\LLETJ^ 



GILLETT'S LYE 



-IS GOOD FOR- 



KILLING ROACHES, 
VERMIN, Etc 

Sell Gilletts Lye 

— FOR— 

KILLING VERMIN. 



E. W. GILLETT COMPANY LIMITED 

TORONTO 



43 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



STOVES AND TINWARE. 



ADVICE TO STOVE MANUFACTURERS. 



PRESIDENT Henry Cribben, of the 
National Association of Stove 
Manufacturers, gave some valuable 
advice to the association in his annual 
address, delivered on Wednesday, May 
11; advice which could be well taken in 
Canada: 

The cost of our production for 1904 
will be about the same as that of 1903, 
less the difference in price of oig iron 
and steel, which is somewhat lower than 
last year; but all other fixed charges are 
the same as heretofore. Therefore, when 
the difference in the price of pig iron 
and steel alone is considered, there is 
very little room for much or any re- 
duction in the selling price of our 
goods. 1 would earnestly recommend 
that you lake up this subject of selling 
prices and give it your earnest and care- 
ful consideration, and make such recom- 
mendations as you think are necessary 
under the present conditions, and you 
will find it will prove to be time well 
and profitably spent. It is very much 
easier for the members of this associa- 
tion to reduce their selling prices than 
it is to advance them; therefore, it be- 
comes our duty to maintain as fair pro- 
fitable selling prices for the future as 
well, at least, as we have done during 
the past five years, through the efforts 
and co-operation of the local district as- 
sociations. 

Great and lasting benefits may be se- 
cured if the district associations will co- 
operate earnestly with each other, and 
by their united efforts cheek the down- 
ward trend of selling prices, which if 
once allowed to start will go below the 
actual cost of the manufactured pro- 
duct. To prevent this unpleasant con- 
dition it is the duty of all members pres- 
ent and absent to use their utmost en- 
deavors to maintain a good market for 
their product by selling their stoves at 
such prices as will afford them a fair 
margin of profit. 

During the past few years our product 
has been changing from cast -iron to 
steel and cast iron combined. Many 
think the cost formula adopted by the 
association does not meet the require- 
ments of the present steel and cast iron 
c( nstruction, and believe that a change 



is necessary for figuring out the cor- 
rect cost of the stoves and ranges we 
manufacture of that class. Our present 
cost formula has proved very satisfac- 
tory in figuring the cost of cast iron 
stoves and ranges, and if we can secure 
the correct amount to charge for the 
manufacturing expenses of the steel por- 
tion of the goods we manufacture the 
matter will be simplified. All that will 
be required is to make use of the two 
columns of direct charges, one consist- 
ing of the cast iron and the other con- 
sisting of steel, adding the correct per- 
centage of manufacturing expense for 
each class of material, and in the con- 
struction of each stove or range so con- 
structed. 

W. H. Carrick Bereaved. 
The trade will sympathize with W. H. 
Carrick, vice-president and general man- 
ager of the Gurney Foundry Co., To- 
ronto, on the death of his son, Rolph 
W. Carrick, who died at his father's 
home, Toronto, on Sunday morning, af- 
ter an illness extending over several 
months. The funeral, on Tuesday, 
though private, was attended by several 
members of the Gurnev Co.'s staff. 

Notes of the Trade. 

R. G. Hay, tinsmith, Ottawa, is re- 
tiring from business. 

Froom & Ball, tinsmiths, Winchester 
Springs, Ont., have dissolved partner- 
ship; R. Ball continues the business. 

C P. R. LINE TO SUDBURY. 

The C. P. R. have completed arrange- 
ments for the construction of a line 
from Toronto to Sudbury, Ont. Loca- 
tion work for the new line has already 
been completed to French River, and the 
entire undertaking will be pushed to a 
completion just, as speedily as possible. 
The statement that a contract has been 
closed between the Canadian Pacific 
Railway and Foley Bros, for the con- 
struction of the road is understood to he 
somewhat premature. The Ontario 
Government has alreadv guaranteed the 
bonds of the James Bay Railway from 
Sudbury to Toronto— the project pro- 
moted bv Mackenzie and Mann— and the 
news that the C. P. R. is about to en- 
ter the field has caused considerable 
comment. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 



Wife-Cone £s Toaster 

Only perfect Bread Toaster for Gas 
or Gasoline Stoves. No smoky taste 
to bread toasted on this toaster. 

Write for prices. 

H.O.Edy, Montreal. E.T.Wright & Co., Hamilton 
HARKINS & WILLIS, 

Manufacturers and Inventors - Ann Harbor, Mich 





( COVERT MFG. CO. 

\ West Troy, !N.Y. 

\\ Steel Carriage and Wagon Jacks 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

SOLD BY ALL LEADING JOBBERS. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

I ftAl> -,- °^--^? Largest Variety, 

> ti: ^--'/>f Toilet, Hand, Electric Power! 

. ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sheep-Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOB CATALOGUE TO 
American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H..CSA 

Wiebusch & Hilger, Limited, special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 





PAT. 1809 




The FAIRGRIEVE GAS TOASTER 

Retails at 25c. The only Toaster guaranteed to toast on 
gas, gasoline or blue flame oil stoves without taste or smell. 
Write for prices. 

THE FAIRGRIEVE MAN'FG. CO., 

295 COLLEGE ST., TORONTO. 
(I. S. Branch: 289 Jefferson Ave.. DETROIT 

Agents for Great Britain : Heine, Solly & Co., Sutton 
House, 2 Old Street, London, E.C. 



O. G. EAVETWOUGH 

Conductor Pipe, Plain and Corrugated. 
Conductor Elbows, Plain and Corrugated . 
Hooks, Spikes and Solder. 

A FULL SUPPLY OF TINSHITHS' TOOLS. 




E. T. Wright & Co., HamUton, Canafla. 



4* 



May 21, 1904. 

Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 



Stoves and tinware 



Hardware and Metal 




This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove ft Hardware Co 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION FRONT GRATE. 

Ends Slide in Dovetails similar to 
Diamond Stove Baok. 

Diamond 

Adjustable Cook 

Stove Damper 

Patented March Hth, 1893. 





For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S. A 
" TAYLOR-FORBES CO., Limited. Guelpb, Ontario. 




p-h Nipples and Couplings. 

Every Nipple has precisely the same number of threads on each end. 
All threads are cut absolutely to Brigg's standard sizes. 
All our Nipples are made from P-H Crown Pipe and not from scrap. 
Like our Pipe, these Nipples are the best of any made in Canada. 

The quality will be remembered long after the price is forgotten. 

Page-Hersey Iron & Tube Co., Limited, Guelph, Can, 

Davidson's Milk Can Trimmings 

anCl rlllk CanS with broad hoop patent bottoms 

give great satisfaction 
and are justly entitled to their 
popularity. 




IN COMPLETE 

SETS. 

"Broad Hoop" Pattern 
— Composed of the following: 
i Broad Hoop Bottom, x 
Cover, I Centre Hoop 6 in. 
wide, 20 gauge, 1 Broad Top 
Hoop, 1 pair Cover Handles, 
1 pair Side Handles. 



Our BROAD-HOOP BOTTOM has all the 

advantages of a Seamless Bottom without the 
strain that spinning entails. 

BOTTOMS can be sweated in with very little 
solder. 

BOTTOMS are concave, draining to the 
centre, and are therefore easy to wash out and 
will not corrode. 

Top bands are shouldered and all bands have 
retmned edges. 

PATENT FLUSH SIDE HANDLES. 



WE CAN SUPPLY BEST QUALITY TINNED IRON 
AT LOWEST MARKET PRICES. 




Heavy Rolled Edges make our Patent BOTTOMS 
doubly durable and waggon and factory Moor 
protectors. 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. Limited. . . .MONTREAL. 



45 



Hardware and Metal 



May 21, 1904. 




MONTREAL BUILDING PROSPECTS. 



IN Montreal the building outlook for 
the coming season is none too 
bright. An uneasy feeling amongst 
builders and contractors seems to be 
prevalent. This fact is due to the rest- 
lessness in labor circles on all sides, 
rendering the proper tendering of a con- 
tract on the part of the builders an 
uncertain quantity. Were it not for this 
fact there would, no doubt, be a much 
larger amount of construction, both large 
and small, in active operation at the 
present time. 

A representative of Hardware and 
Metal interviewed several of the archi- 
tects of the city on the question. Geo. 
W. Wood, of Hutchinson & Wood, in 
discussing- the situation, said: "There 
seems to be a lot of work in view, and 
many buildings planned, but owing to 
the unsettled condition of the labor mar- 
ket the contractors are holding back. 
We have just called for tenders on a 
contract, but there are very few bids, 
and all high. The fact is, contractors 
are afraid to take hold of work." 

M. W. Hogle, of Taylor, Hogle & Da- 
vis, remarked: "Not much can be said 
regai'ding building prospects for the 
year, and one cannot say whether the 
outlook is good or not. There is some 
talk of several large undertakings being 
gone through with, hut as yet none of 
them have assumed definite shape. " 

These views seem to represent the 
general feeling regarding the state of 
affairs in the building line. Many 
builders and contractors are putting up 
small buildings and residences on their 
own account, thus keeping their men 
busy, rather than risk the loss that 
would be entailed if a strike found them 
engaged in a large contract. There are, 
however, a number of big contracts 
about to be filled, notably manufactur- 
ing work in the outskirts of the city 
and the new steel freight sheds at the 
harbor. 

The Globe Brass Works. 

The Globe Brass Works, of Detroit, 
Michigan, have announced their intention 
of specializing, hereafter, on ground key 
work. They are already extensive 



manufacturers of steam, gas and air 
cocks, also ground key bibbs, but new 
machinery was recently added and many 
new and up-to-date patterns were sub- 
stituted for the old style. A bibb of a 
new and attractive pattern is being 
manufactured and a very extensive sale 
is promised. 



President Mellon. 
\ MONG the Hamilton plumbing fra- 
£^ ternity none are held in greater 
esteem and respect than Stephen 
Mellon, president of the Master Plum- 
bers' Association, of Hamilton. Mr. 




Stephen Mellon, Hamilton. 

Mellon is recognized as one of the most, 
careful and thorough workmen in his 
city, his reputation in this regard hav- 
ing gone a long way to make him a 
successful plumber in every sense of the 
term. When not at work Mr. Mellon is 
an all-round sport. One of his warm 
personal friends, Win. Linton, of the 
Standard Ideal Sanitary Co., insists 
that he is "the peer of them all" with 
the gloves and would like to match him 
for a bout with the president of any 
branch association in the Dominion, To- 
ronto preferred. He is also an ardent 
yachtsman, having some hard-fought and 
well-earned victories to his credit in 
I his sport. 



Kingston Plumbers Agree. 

The trouble between the Kingston 
Journeymen Plumbers' Union and the 
master plumbers of that city has been 
settled, and the men have returned to 
work. No further troubles are antici- 
pated in the building trades of King- 
ston. 

National Association Report. 

T* HE published report of the eighth 
annual convention of Master 
Plumbers, Gas, Steam and Hot 
Water Fitters of the Dominion of Can- 
ada, is to hand. 

The frontispiece is an excellent like- 
ness of Joseph Thibeault, Esq., of Mon- 
treal, the president of the association. 
The body of the report is taken up with 
the proceedings of the convention, with 
a list of officers, which was given at the 
time in Hardware and Metal. The 
president's address is given in full, as 
well as are the reports from the differ- 
ent committees and provisional vice- 
presidents. In this way no district of 
Canada is neglected, but all parts are 
brought, in active touch with what is 
being done. The standing committees 
are : Legislative, apprenticeship, sani- 
tary and essay. The report of the 
chairman of each of these is embodied 
in the whole. Photos of the different 
officers appear throughout the report. 
An account of the banquet and a group 
photo of the delegates are also given, 
while the last dozen pages are devoted 
to the constitution and by-laws of the 
association. 

Building Permits. 

TORONTO. 

Mrs. H. Tatten, two dwellings on 
First avenue, to cost $3,800. 

H. D. Robertson, two dwellings on 
Avenue road, to cost $4,400. 

W. S. Mitchell, a dwelling on Mon- 
trose avenue, to cost $1,200. 

J. A. Newton, a dwelling on Simpson 
avenue, to cost $1,800. 

C. E. Walton, a dwelling on Smith 
street, to cost $1,500. 

W. J. C. McCrea, a dwelling on Mon- 
trose avenue, to cost $2,000. 

Geo. Jackson, a dwelling on Rox- 
borough avenue, to cost $3,200. 

Estates, Limited, a dwelling on 
Bathurst street, to cost $5,500. 

Controller Shaw, a dwelling on Rox- 
borough street, to cost $3,500. 



4<; 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Your Varnish Trade 




Try a varnish that will sell and keep its reputation, while 
making customers for you. 

Let it be a varnish already established, long tried and proved. 
Then you make a profit, as good varnishes pay the dealer 



well. 



RAMSAY'S UNIVERSAL 



is a seller, returns handsome profits, makes a reputation, satisfies 
all. It's for boats, counters, desks, doors, carriages, floors, etc. 

Ask for our booklet explaining about the rebate that goes with 
each can to your customer and how we pay it — not you. 



RAMSAY & SON 
MONTREAL 



EST'D 
1842 



VARNISH 
MAKERS 



^^s&memsms&im&oqg 




99Si99»9S99SSi9SSi9S»99»9&i 




Some ranges are like a cinnamon 
tree, the bark is worth more than the 
bush. Handsome exteriors are good — 
that is why we make the 

Imperial Oxford Range 

so handsome to look at. But we also 
make it the best cooker on the market — 
that is why it sells so well. Would you 
like the agency for your district ? 

WRITE US ABOUT IT 

The tiurney Foundry Co., Limited, 

TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

THE GURNEY STANDARD METAL CO., LIMITED 
CALGARY, ALTA. 



47 



Hardware and Metal 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



May 21, 1904. 



J. F. Brown, two dwellings on Powell 
avenue, Rosedale, to cost $8,000. 

John Slitchter, a residence on First 
avenue, to cost $2,400. 

Air. Blair, a residence on Devercourl 
road, to cost $2,700. 

Win. Murray, two dwellings on Spa- 
dina road, to cost $2,700. 

L. L. Miller, a dwelling on Symington 
avenue, to cost $2,500. 

Geo. Tambling, a pair of dwellings on 
Simpson avenue, to cost $4,000. 

T. H. Cooper and A. VV. Stephenson, 
two dwellings on Huron street, to cost 
$5,000. 

Brown Bros., Limited, a brick ware- 
house on Wellington street west, to 
cost $10,000. 

MONTREAL. 

Levi Reid, on 783-7 Berri street, one 
building, to cost $3,500. 

A. Savcageau, 16 Aylwyn street, one 
building, to cost $2,800. 

R. A. Ross, on Crescent street, one 
dwelling, to cost $10,000. 

Louis Juteau, to erect on Huntley 
street, one dwelling, to cost $1,000. 

P. Archambault, 2 Parker street, one 
building, to cost $2,400. 

B. Biron, Marquette street, one house, 
to cost $3,400. 

Emile Vincent, to erect on Aylmer 
street, one building, to cost $1,900. 

A. Champagne, Christophe Columb 
street, one dwelling, to cost $2,000. 

Michael Lamil, 1332 St. Andre street, 
one building, to cost $2,200. 

Mrs. M. E. Labeau, on Cowan street, 
one building to cost $2,500. 

J. W. Hughes, plumber, corner Craig 
and St. Antoine, one building, to cost 
$10,000. 

Grand Trunk Railway Co., in Bona- 
venture yard, one building, to cost $6,- 
000. 

D. Perrault, to erect on Gamier 
street, one two-storey building, to cost 
$2,000. 

S. D. Vallieres, to erect at 1049 St. 
Denis street, one building, to cost $2,- 
800. 

J. Emile Gamier, alteration on one 
house at 335 Rachel street, to cost 
$3,500. 

F. H. Lalonde, of 451 Maisonneuve 
street, four houses on Aylmer street, to 
cost $6,500. 

HAMILTON. 

James Holden, a $1,000 frame house, 
for John Gompf, in Norwood Park. 

Wm. Hancock, two houses, to cost 
$2,400, on Dundurn street, between Tom 
and Jones streets, for William Legge. 

William Yates & Son, a dwelling for 
Thomas Wilson, on Wilson street, be- 
tween Went worth street and Sanford 
avenue. 

E. B. Patterson, alterations to cost 
$1,000 to R. N. Wheeler's store, at the 
corner of Cannon and Tisdale streets. 

John McMahon, two houses, worth 
about $1,600 each, on Wilson street, 
near Ferguson avenue; E. B. Patterson, 
architect. 

OTTAWA. 

Nelson Renaud, solid brick dwelling on 
Cathead street, to cost $2,300. 



Robert Pull, rough cast house on 
Eccles street, $800. 

E. G. Laverdure, ten solid brick 
houses on Sussex street, to cost in all 
$15,000. 

J. C. Brennan, solid brick warehouse, 
to be 95 feet, on Queen street, probable 
cost $8,000. 



John Hayman, three-tenement terrace, 
on Dundas and Glebe streets. 

E. M. Hartford, a brick veneer dwell- 
ing, on Tecumseth street. 

TORONTO JUNCTION. 

W. Irvine, house, Western avenue. 
J. Marr, three dwellings, Union street. 
O. Bonham, dwelling, Mulock avenue. 
T. Wright, dwelling, Clendenan avenue. 
A. Peters, house, Gilmour avenue. 
R. J. Nichols, residence, Lakeview 
avenue. 

T. J. Lennox, dwelling, Humberside 
avenue. 

Charles Proctor, six dwellings, Union 
street. 

James Bryce, pair dwellings, Mulock 
avenue. 

Plumbing and Heating Notes. 

R. W. Philips, plumber, Guelph, Out., 
lias been succeeded by F. Smith. 

The creditors of the Boston Wood 
Rim Co., Toronto, were called to meet 
on Thursday, May 19. 

Building Notes. 

Brick is scarce in Winnipeg. 

A $25,000 armory is to be erected in 
Kossland, B.C. 

The Avenue Hotel, Dupont street, 
Vancouver, is to be extended. 

Wm. Linton is building a residence 
for Harding Waters at St. John, N.B. 

A new Presbyterian church is to be 
erected in Cayuga, Out. 

P. R. Brown & Co. are about to ei'ect 
a block on Fort street, Victoria. 

It is proposed to build a consolidated 
school in Hampton, Que. 

P. Gagnon is building a residence on 
St. Julie street, Quebec, to cost $5,000. 

A frame schoolhouse is to be erected 
on Kaye street, Halifax, N.S. 

A new school is to be built at Fair- 
ville, N.B. Its basement is to be of con- 
crete. 

Hugh Walker & Son, grocers, Guelph, 
Out., are to erect a new $10,000 ware- 
house in Guelph. \. 

Tenders are being called for the erec- 
tion of a Y.M.C.A. building in Paris,' 
Out. 

Work on the Young Liberal Club 
building, Winnipeg, will be commenced 
very soon. 

A modern brick store and apartment 
block is to be erected on Garry street, 
Winnipeg, by J. Badale. 

Tell'onl Bros.; Winnipeg, are going to 
erect a new business block on Lombard 
street. 



W. F. Eaton and Ed. Henry will 
erect modern residences in Pickering, 
Out., this Summer. 

Wm. Mose, Mr. Jenkinson and J. T. 
Cook are erecting residences at Elm 
Creek, Man. 

Everett Peel, Clarence Thompson and 
C. O. Black intend building residences 
at Oxford, N.S. 

Joseph Wrigley is asking for sealed 
tenders before May 28 for a 400-foot 
bridge over the Grand, near Gait, Ont. 

A five-storey hotel is to be erected on 
Pender and Seymour streets, Vancouver. 
It will cost about $75,000. 

Two two-storey brick blocks are to be 
erected on Pender street, Vancouver, 
costing in all about $135,000. 

A new school called the Oak Street 
School, is to be erected in Brantford, 
Ont. 

A five-storey brick building will be 
erected on Germain street, St. John, N. 
B., by Emerson & Fisher. 

The Wilson Vinegar Works are build- 
ing new premises, and J. E. Weston is 
erecting a new warehouse in Tillson- 
burg, Ont. 

It is proposed to erect on five 
lots on Pender street, Vancouver, a block 
of stoics ami warehouses to cover the 
entire five lots. 

The Allan Steamship Co. has decided 
to erect a large addition to their office 
building on corner of St. Peter and 
Youville streets, Montreal. 

The Broadway Methodist Church, 
Winnipeg, are going to build a new 
church to cost $117,000, with a seating 
capacity of 1,000. 

Fire did about $75,000 loss at Gan- 
anoque, Out., last week. The Skinner 
Co. 's harness factory was one of the 
places destroyed. 

Some New York capitalists propose 
to erect in Ottawa a new hotel, to cost 
$1,000,000. The plans provide for the 
accommodation of 500 guests. 

The congregation of All Saints' 
Church, Peterborough, have decided to 
commence building their new church to 
cost $20,000 and to seat 800 people. 

The Separate School building in St. 
Thomas, Out., is to be remodeled both 
inside and outside, including the heat- 
ing and ventilating systems. 

P. Dierlamm, Stratford, Ont., has in- 
vented a cement building block and has 
taken out a patent covering it. A plant 
for the manufacture of the brick is to 
be installed. 

Tenders will be received by a repre- 

jsejrtative of "Constructions, Limited," 

'Toronto, at the Grand Hotel, Gait, Ont., 

for the erection of thirty houses, to 

take place in that town this Summer. 

The contract for the construction of a 
jubwav under the main street in Winni- 
peg has been let by the C. P. R. to 
Dceks & Deeks, of that city. The 
structure will be built of concrete, re- 
inforced with steel, will have five arches 
and room for eight tracks. It is to be 
finished bv September 1, and is to cost 
more than $100,000. The contract for 
the new hotel is expected to be accepted 
this week. 



48 



May 21, 1904. 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



Hardware and Metal 



A 63-Mile Fence. 

ACCORDING to the Kansas City 
Journal, one of the longest fences 
in the Northwest is being con- 
structed, running entirely around the 
Lower Brule Indian Reservation, on the 
Missouri River, in the central portion of 
South Dakota. This remarkable fence 
will be sixty-three miles in length. It 
is composed of four wires placed on 
posts set a rod apart, cedar and ash 
posts alternating. In its construction 
250 miles of wire will be used, or 7(6,000 
pounds. To erect the fence required an 
aggregate of 19,000 posts. In this long 
fence there will be only three gateways, 
which will be guarded when the fence is 
completed 

The fence is being constructed by the 
Indians themselves under the direction 
of the agency authorities, the Indians 
receiving $2.50 per day for man and 
team and $1.25 per day for men. It is 
understood that next Spring the Gov- 
ernment will issue stock cattle to the 
Indians, to be grazed inside this huge 
inclosure, the purpose of the Govern- 
ment being to encourage the Indians in 
stock raising so that they can ultimate- 
ly support themselves. 



Manufacturers' 

:s 



nr Hardware and 

10 Metal has in- 

quiries from time 
to time from 
manufacturers 
AorAtlfc and others want- 

H S WU " ing representat- 

ives in the leading business centres here 
and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their 
names and addresses placed on a special 
list kept for the information of inquirers 
in our various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 



PIG IRON 



FOR 
IMPORT. 



Carnbroe, Summerlee, Gartsherrie and Middlesboro', Glengarnock. 



Henry Rogers, Sons & Co., Montreal, P.Q. 

They Cost No More 

than wood screens. Then why 
sell wood screens ? 

Our Metal Screens are vastly ahead 
of the wood-framed article. 

Circular tells about them. Send for It. 



C. M. CUTTS & CO. 

Maker., Toronto J Vmct.OH. 



„£*«j$ETURNHa 



Jardine Patent 



Pipe Die. 



One man can easily thread a two-inch pipe at 
one cut. Write for circular. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

Mfrs. TAPS and DIES. 
HESPELER, ONT. 




0+***^' 



"U/ A 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



May 21, 1904. 




Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receire from any authoritatiie source industrial news of any sort, the 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, etc. All such correspondence will be treated as confidential when desired. 



ACTIVE operation on the pro- 
posed line of railway from 
Guelph to Goderich will be 
commenced by the C. P. E. as soon 
as the right-of-way has been settled. 
Guelph and Goderich have each voted 
a bonus to the line, and the municipali- 
ties through which it passes have voted 
large enough bonuses to provide a free 
right-Of-way. 

* ♦ * 

The Gait Down Draft Furnace Co., 
Ltd., will apply to the Legislature for 
incorporation. The necessary capital has 
already been subscribed by local busi- 
ness men. The object of the company 
is to manufacture the Witt Down Draft 
Furnace at present turned out by C. 
Witt & Co.. Norwich, Ont., and also 
stoves and ranges. A building 60x150 
feet will be erected, and it is hoped that 
the company will be able to commence 
operations by the end of the Summer or 
early in the Fall. In the meantime busi- 
ness will be carried on in Norwich as 
usual. 

* * » 

The meeting of the organization of 
the Imperial Coal and Coke Co , Ltd., 
was held in Montreal on May 11. The 
following permanent board of directors 
was appointed: Messrs. W. Herbert Ev- 
ans, Montreal; J. W. Pyke, Montreal; 
Randolph MacDonald, Toronto; C. W. 
Spencer, Frank Thompson, both of 
Montreal; Andrew Laidlaw and 0. G. 
Laberee, Spokane, Wash. The company 
has a capital of $4,000,000, and it is 
expected that there will be $1,500,000 
in the treasury for the purpose of de- 
velopment. At a meeting of the board 
of directors W. H. Evans was elected 
president, J. W. Pyke, vice-president, 
and Homer Hall, secretary. 



Negotiations are in progress regarding 
the establishment of a new furniture 
factory in Stratford. The Webster 
Manufacturing Co., Superior, Wis., pro- 
pose through W. H. Crowe and F. A. 
Nichols to establish a factory to cost 
$25, 000 and to employ from fifty to one 
hundred hands on condition that the 
property be exempt from taxation for 



ten years, and the city grant them a 
bonus of $1,000 -to go towards the pur- 
chase of a site and the putting in of a 

siding. 

• • • 

St. John, N.B., is to have a new in- 
dustry. The St. John Sun says that T. 
H. Barnes and Win. Brown, both of 
Hampton, are installing a plant for the 
manufacture of pails, tubs, etc. There 
is no factory of this kind in the Mari- 
time Provinces, although . there is a 
steady demand for the products, which 
are obtained from Ontario principally 
at the present time. For this reason, 
there should be good prospects in the 
Maritime Provinces for such an indus- 
try. 

• • • 

At the regular quarterly meeting of 
the Almonte Board of Trade, held on 
May 11, a letter was read from the sec- 
retary of the Ottawa Board of Trade 
regarding a resoluton which their board 
passed, asking that the present duty on 
soft coal be removed. It was explained 
that the Dominion Coal beds were too 
far from Ontario, where a large amount 
of soft coal was used for manufactur- 
ing', to be brought into competition 
with the American coal, on account of 
transportation rates; and also if the 
duty were removed it would in no way 
interfere with the Dominion Co.'s trade. 
After considerable discussion a similar 
resolution was adopted by the Almonte 
board. 

NOTES. 

T. G. Blackstock, of Toronto, is in 
Ottawa to urge that the Government ex- 
tend the bounty on lead so that it shall 
apply to the exports of the British Co- 
lumbia smelters shipped to Germany in 
the shape of concentrates. 

The Papineati Bros.' sawmill, St. 
George, Man., has been completely de- 
stroyed by fire. The loss is $10,000, not 
covered by insurance. 

A proposition to establish a small 
brass factory in the 'town of Wallace- 
burg is being placed before the busi- 
ness men of that town by the Board of 
Trade. 

A. Klipstein & Co., Ltd., have been 
granted a license to manufacture and 
50 



deai in dyes, chemicals, oils and other 
goods in Ontario, using a capital not 
larger than $40,000. 

The Cornwall Beef Co., have been 
licensed to carry on their business in 
Ontario of dealers in provisions and 
packing house products, using a capital 
not larger than $25,000. 

St. Mary's, Ont., has passed a by-law 
guaranteeing the bonds for $100,000 of 
the Church & Watt Co., and exempt- 
ing that company from taxes. They are 
to build a factory in St. Mary's. 

The total amount of anthracite coal 
produced in Pennsylvania during 1903 
was 67,000,000 tons, valued at the mines 
at $35,000,000, and at the point of dis- 
tribution at $300,000,000. 

A large section of a proposed block 
covering five lots on Pender street, 
Vancouver, is to be occupied as a shoe 
manufacturing establishment by the 
British Columbia Manufacturers' 
Agency. 

The Canadian Otis Elevator Co., Ham- 
ilton, have decided to erect a branch 
factory in Winnipeg, and H. B. Douglas, 
general manager of the company, has 
been in Winnipeg completing prepara- 
tions for its construction. 

COMPANIES INCORPORATED. 

The Kamloops Lumber Co., Toronto, 
capital $500,000; purpose, to carry on 
a general lumbering business. 

The Canadian Economic Lubricant 
Co., Montreal, capital $50,000; purpose, 
to do a general oil business. 

Canadian Lines, Limited, Toronto, 
capital $1,000,000; purpose, to act as 
ship-owners and passenger and freight 
carriers. 

The Canada Land and Power Co., 
Montreal, capital $1,000,000; purpose, to 
develop lands and generate electricity. 

The Imperial Light, Heat and Power 
Co., Montreal, capital $3,000,000; pur- 
pose, to deevlop electricity, deal in fuel 
of all kinds and manufacture steel, iron 
and other metal goods. 

The Elliott Millman Co., Ltd., Lon- 
don, capital $40,000; purpose, to carry 
on the business of manufacturers of 
and jobbers in dry goods and men's fur- 
nishings. 

The Dominion Business College, Ltd., 
Toronto, capital $40,000; to carry on a 
business college. 

The W. J. Bolus Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
capital $50,000; to carry on the business 
of painters, decorators and dealers in 
wall paper, etc. 



May 21, 1904. 
f 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



^ 



J UN 24 19(H f 

JB S. § «"*• 

it 




Cur of Sf. Mary's I?. C. Church, Calgary, shoving metallic 

towers supplied by the 

Metal Shingle <£ Siding Co., Preston. 



Do You Know ? 



That we have an up-to-date Cornice Depart- 
ment in connection with our business ; in fact 
we employ several mechanics who are 
specialists in cornice work and we are prepared 
to make anything which can be constructed 

in the Sheet Metal Building Line. 

Estimates supplied from architects' drawings, 
prints, or rough sketches. 

Give our Cornice Department a trial and 
see what we can do for you. All work 
guaranteed. 



The rietal Shingle 
& Siding Co., Limited 

Preston, Ont. 



Representatives : CLARE & BROCKEST, Winnipeg. 
ELLIS & GROGAN, Galgary. 



HORSE CLIPPER 
MAKERS 



Hardware and Metal 

TO HIS MAJESTY 
THE KING. 



The BARTON GILLETTE HORSE 
CLIPPING and SHEEP SHEARING CO., 

103 NEW OXFORD ST., LONDON. W.C. Limited 

SOMETHING ENTIRELY NEW IN HAND CLIPPERS. 



THE 
CORONATION. 

Fitted with our 
Patent Ball Race 
which has enabled 
us to secure all 
prizes and medals 
awarded for Horse 
Clipping and 
Sheep Shearing 
Machinery. 



USED EXCLUSIVELY 

IN THE 

Roval Stables. 




THE 
CORONATION. 

The plates are 
considerably wid- 
er than those sup- 
plied with any 
other Clipper.thus 
enabling the user 
to do more work. 

PATENT ANTI-FRIC- 
TIONAL LEVERS 
and BEST FINISH. 



USED EXCLUSIVELY 

IN THE 

Royal Stables. 



AWARDED 2 FIRST PRIZES ROYAL SHOW OF ENGLAND BEATING ALL 
COMERS, AND 12 MEDALS AT VARIOUS AGRICULTURAL 8HOWS. 
Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Terms. Agents wanted everywhere. 
THE BARTON GILLETTE POWER CLIPPERS used ex- 
clusively in the stables of: — H. M. The King, H.R.H. The 
Prince of Wales, H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught, and all 
the leading nobility and gentry. 



T HE GURNE Y 

STANDARD SCALES 



Absolutely Accurate and Reliable. The Best of Material 
and Workmanship. Recognized throughout Canada as 

"THE STANDARD" 




We make scales of every description. Established 1856. 
Send for catalogue and printed matter. 

The Gurney Scale Co., Hamilton nt 

Eastern Warehouse : Western Warehouse : 

The Gurney-Massey Co., Limited The Gurney Stove and Range Co. 
Montreal, Que. Winnipeg, Man. Limited, 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



May 21, 1904. 



FIRE TESTS. 

SOME interesting tire tests were car- 
ried on this week in Montreal 
under the supervision of Chief 
Biescoit of the Fire Department. Sev- 
eral large' buildings on St. Sacrament 
street have recently been equipped with 
water curtain systems, and these were 
being tested. Two lines of hose were 
attached from a neighboring hydrant 
and the water turned on. Immediately 
the front of the building under test was 
enveloped in a curtain of water, al- 
though the presure at the hydrant was 
only seventy-four pounds. They expect 
to make further tests soon, placing a 
fire engine at the hydrant and doubling 
the pressure. As far as the tests were 
carried on they were entirely satisfac- 
tory, demonstrating the value and useful- 
ness of this system under actual work- 
ing conditions. If all buildings were 
thus protected from fire from an out- 
side source there would be no possi- 
bility of a fire making a general sweep 
as did the recent devastating blaze that 
swept Toronto. These curtains were in- 
stalled by the H. Gr. Vogel Co., of 1 and 
3 Mercer street, New York, who have a 
branch engineering department at 30 St. 
George street, Montreal. 



COAL PRICES AT HULL AND TYNE. 

JOHN B. JACKSON, commercial 
agent at Leeds and Hull, Eng., re- 
ports : 
"Having received several inquiries 
from Canada as to the price of steam 
and gas coal in this district, I have 
gone into the matter very thoroughly 
with the collieries in my district, and 
for the benefit of the manufacturers of 
Canada attach herewith quotations from 
the collieries in Yorkshire, Durham and 
Northumberland. 

"As will be seen from the below quo- 
tations, the price of the different quali- 
ties of coal run from about $1.50 for 
small, and $3 for best, the medium price 
being about $2.60; this includes free on 
board at port with the shilling export 
tax paid. The freight from these ports 
at present is 5s. or $1.22 per ton. There 
are only two drawbacks to a very large 
trade being done in coal. First : The 
export duly here of Is. a ton. Second : 
The duty in Canada of 10 cents or there- 
abouts per ton. In the following the 
tax charges are included in the quota- 
tions, and the long ton (2,240 lbs.) is 
used : 

1. RotherVale- 
IJt;st screened hard steam 
•co»l. -24,000 tons at rate 
of 2,000 tons per month, 

overl2months lis. 3d. ($2.73) F.O.B , Hull 

lis. 2d. ($2.71) " Grimsby 

10b. lid. ($2.65) " Goole 



Unscreened h»rd steam 
coal.— 36,000 tons, 3,000 

tiins per month 10s. 3d. (82.49) " 

10s. 2d. ($2.47) " 
9s. lid. ($2.41) " 
Rough gas coal— 24,000 
tons,2,000tonspermonth. 9s. Od. ($2.19) " 
8s. lid, ($2.17) " 
8s. 8d. ($2.10) " 
Best washed smithy or gas 
nuts.— 5,000 tons in equal 
monthly quantities, 6 
summer months, April 

to September 10s. 3d. ($2.49) 

10s. 2d. ($2.47) " 
9s. lid. ($2.41) " 

2. Denaby & Cadeby— 

Best South Yorkshire- 
Hard steam coal 12s. Od. ($2.82) " 

Washed steam coal lis. Od. ($2.67) 

doubles lUs. 9d. ($2.61) 

" singles 9s. 9d. ($2.37) 

" gas coal lis. Od. ($2.67) 

3. Thorncliffe— 

Screened coal 12s. 4d. ($3.00) F.O.B., 

lis. lOd. ($2.88) " 

4. Old Silkstone— 

Large screened gas coal. .. 12s. 3d. ($2.98) " 

Small lis. 9d. ($2.85) " 

Large unscreened lis. 5d. ($2.77) 

Small lis. 2d. ($2.71) " 

Screened cannel 14s. 2d. ($3.44) " 

Best furnace coke 14s. 9d. ($3.58) 

5. Glass Houghton — 
Large screened silkstone 

coal 12s. 2d. ($2.98) " 

Screened silkstone coal., .lis. Od. ($2.67) " 
Through and through silk- 
stone coal, containing 

one-third screened 7s. 6d. ($1.82) " 

Silkston gas or engine nuts. 10s. Od. ($2.43) " 

" pea nut screened. . 9s. Od. ($2.19) " 

NORTHUMBERLAND. 

~- ' 6. Cowper, Weat Hartley- 
Screened lis. lOd. ($2.89) F.O.B. , 

Unscreened lis. Id. ($2.70) " 

Smalls 6s. 7d. ($1.60) " 

7. Maud, West Hartley- 
Screened 10s. 7d. ($2.56) " 

Unscreened 9s. Id. $2 21) " 

Smalls .• 6s. lOd. ($1.67) " 

•mm 8. Ravensworth, West Hartley- 
Screened lis. Id. ($2.70) " 

Unscreened 9s. 7d. ($2.34) " 

Smalls 6s. lOd. ($1.67) " 

9. West Hartley Main- 
Screened 9s. lOd. ($2.38) " 

Unscreened 8s. 8d. ($2.11) " 

Smalls 6s. Od. ($1.46) " 

DURHAM BTEAM COALS. 

10. Larnbton— 

Screened 10s. lOd. ($2.64) F.O.B. 

DURHAM OAS COALS. 

11. New Pelton— 

Screened 10s. Id. ($2.46) F.O.B. 

12. Holmside— 

Screened 10s. Id. ($2.46) " 

13. Bolden. 

Screened 9s. 7d. ($2.34) " 

14. Benwell— 

Smithy 10s. lOd. ($2.64) " 



Hull 

Grimsby 

Goole 

Hull 

Grimsby 

Goole 



Hull 
Grimsby 
Goole 



Hull 

Goole 



"It will be seen plainly from these 
figures that but for these two duties 
English coal could be laid down at Mon- 
treal at about $3.25 per ton, perhaps 
less in large quantities. I am also in- 
formed that a great deal of our timber 
in Canada is brought over' in small sail- 
ing vessels, which vessels come over in 
ballast. These vessels pay about 40 
cents a ton for their ballast, and I am 
informed that they would be quite will- 
ing to take shipments of four or five 
hundred tons at a load for from 70 to 
90 cents a ton freight. In order to as- 
sist the Canadian trade, it is necessary 
that we should have freight both ways, 
and I submit that this matter of Eng- 
lish coals is of most vital and far- 
reaching importance to the facilitating 
and stimulating of trade between the 
two countries." 



Tyne 



Tyne 



Tyne 



BACK WITH THE OLD FIRM. 

It will be, interesting to the friends of 
A. H. Symonds, who for so many years 
represented George Butler & Co., Lim- 
ited, of Sheffield, in Canada, to know 
that he is now with this firm in Lon- 
don, England. Shortly after Mr. Sym- 
onds's removal from Canada to England, 
he received an appointment with Messrs. 
W. & S. Laycock, railway and marine 
supplies, but after a period of a year or 
two has now rejoined his old firm. 



Nelson, B.C., is to have a new saw 
mill with a cutting capacity of about 
100,000 feet of lumber per 'day. The 
mill will cost in the neighborhood of 
$250,000, and will employ a large force 
of men. 




USE MICA ROOFING 



For Flat or Steep Roofs. It is Waterproof, 
Fireproof, quickly and very easily laid, and 
cheaper than other roofing. 



HAMILTON MICA ROOFING CO., 



60 Catherine Street North, 

52 



HAMILTON, CANADA. ~1 



May 21, 1904. 

. . FULL STOCK 



LDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



Hardware and Metal 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWErTPJPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

'he CANADIAN SEWER PIPE GO. 

HAMILTON. OUT. TORONTO. ONI. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE 



The original »nd only Genuine) 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut. 
lery. 6d. and ll. Caninterg 



OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 

I WORKERS in 

BRASS and COPPER 



You often want Tubing, Sheets 

or Rods of special sizes — We serve 
these needs, quickly, cheaply. 
Write us sbout it. 



The Booth Copper Co., 

LIMITED, 
119-123 Queen St. East, IT 

TORONTO. 5 



Permanent, Economical, 
Handsome, 




Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing. 

Comes in rolls, ready to lay, with nails and cement. 
All ready covered with white sea gravel. No further attention after laid. 

A. C. JENKING, Sole Agent, 
Room 210 Coristine Building, - MONTREAL. 

Sun, Frost, Water, Fumes DO NOT affect it. Write to-day for agency. 




Will Hold Op a Shelf ! 

That's what a shelf, bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothing Bet 
ter, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direct or through your jobber. 

ATLAS MFG. CO., 

Now Haven, Conn., U.S.A. 



PORTLAND CEMENTS 

Best German, Belgian and English 
Brands. 

FIRE BRICKS 

FIRE CLAY 

FLUE LININGS 

DRAIN PIPES 

HARD WALL PLASTER 

CALCINED PLASTER 

WHEELBARROWS 

MORTAR STAINS. 

A Full Stock of Builders' and Con- 
tractors' Supplies. 

W. McNALLY & CO. 

40 to 5a ncOill St (Cor. Wellington St.) 

MONTREAL. 

Write for our quotations. 



$2 



FOR THIS SMALL SUM THE 



$2 



MANUFACTURER . - SUPPLY MERCHANT 

may keep posted on new openings 
for trade. 

IL e CANADIAN CONTRACT RECORD 

reports weekly all projected building and other 
construction works throughout Canada as well 
as new business enterprises. 



Send your name and address with $2 for 
a year's Subscription to 

Canadian Contract Record 



$2 



TORONTO and MONTRtAL 



$2 



CHARLES BAVNES, England. 

KNUZDEN BROOK, 
MAKER OF THE BLACKBURN, 

11 CLICK-CLACK" 

HACK SAW BLADES. 

In Factory Solely 
Devoted to Making 
Hack Saw Blades. 



NONE 
BETTER. 



In All sizes 
of Best 
English Stetl. 



The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 



Manufacturers of • * 
the Celebrated 



HANOVER, ONTARIO. 

Saugeen Brand" 



OF PORTLAND CEMENT. 



Prices on application. 



(( 



THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLE8 D. PHILLIP8, 

Cables— Emlyn Engineering Works 

" Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon., England 




SKYLIGHTS 

CORRUGATED IRON, 
METAL SIDING AND 
CEILINGS. 

WRITE FOR A PROPOSAL. 

Our customers find it a pleasure to 
deal with us. 



A. B. ORMSBY, LIMITED, 

Cor. Queen and George Streets, 
TORONTO, ONT. 



The Saw That Sells Itself. 



When placed in the hands of the intelligent mechanic the ATKINS High Grade Silver 
Steel Hand Saw sells itself. You simply show it and the saw does the rest. 

ATKINS Silver Steel Hand Saws with Perfection Handles are warranted 
the FINEST Saws on earth in material, temper, grinding and finish. 



Write for Catalogue and Prices. 

E. C. ATKINS & CO. 

C. D. TEN EYCK, Sales A^ent for Canada, 

Toronto Office : 30 Front St, East, Tel. Main 1896, 




•0 




? S ^-^" ATKINS 

ALWAYS AHEAD 

leading Saw and Fool Manufacturers 

Factories: INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
Northwestern Branch: Minneapolis, Minn. 



53 



Hardware and Metal 



THE OFFICE 



May 21, 1904. 




Oilrightfor delicate mech- 
anism, guns, bicycles, etc. 
"3 in 1" is the ideal lubricant 
for all oiling purposes. Will 
not gum, thicken, turn rancid 
or collect dust. Cleans and 
polishes and positively pre- 
vents rust on metal surfaces 
in any climate or in any kind 
of weather, better than furni- 
ture polish for veneered and 
varnished surfaces. Sold by 
all the leading jobbers in 
Canada. 



G. W. COLE CO. 

141 Washington Life Bldg., New York. 




A Merchant's Judgment, 



is sure to approve the mechan- 
ism and system of . . . 

THE HALLWOOD 
CASH REGISTER 

The Hallwood is the best cash 
register constructed to-day ; — that 
is the first point. It is simpler than 
any other, has fewer parts, is 
stronger, is cheaper. 

It does all that other registers can 
do, and something in addition. 

There is no good reason why pro- 
gressive merchants should be with- 
out a Hallwood. 

SEND FOB. DESCRIPTIVE LITERATURE. 
THE 



Hallwood Gash Roaster Co. of Canada 



78-80 King St. E., 
TORONTO. 



1782 Notre Dame St., 
MONTREAL. 




rr^irtTincj We do Good Printing Cheap 



1,000 Business Cards, 
1,000 Note Heads, - 
1,000 Statements, 
1,000 Dodgers, 



$1.50 
11.00 
$1.50 
$1.25 



Write for Samples. 



G. A. Weese & Son, 44 Yonge St., Toronto. 



ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS 

Write for particulars about our cuts and ads. from 50 cents up. To 
advertise in newspapers. Catchy ideas to catch business. Given to one 
merchant in a town. Send us your ads. and we will criticise them free. 
Write To-day. 

GEO. J. SMITH BUREAU, sz.broadwav.n.y . 

WE WRITE ADS. IN FRENCH. 






Hardware and Metal 



May 21, 1904. 



THE OFFICE 



DEVOTED TO THE 
OFFICE STAFFS OF 
BUSINESS 
ESTABLISHMENTS 



VALUE OF GOOD STATIONERY. 

THE stationery which a business house uses in 
its correspondence will always be one of the 
first and most important criterions by which 
the world will judge that firm's standing. First 
impressions are lasting and in many cases the 
first impression that a correspondent gets of a firm's 
business methods is the stationery on which the corre- 
spondence is carried on. Cheap printing, or worse yet, 
poor writing paper without any printing at all, can hard- 
ly produce a favorable impression of careful, up-to-date 
methods. On the other hand, neat and cleanly printed 
stationery cannot help but give an impression of financi- 
al soundness, which evidences of seemingly lower stand- 
ards in other lines cannot efface. 

Many small retail merchants complain of the difficulty 
they find in procuring credit from large manufacturers. 
"We always pay our bills promptly, our credit rating is 
good, but there seems to be something else that is wrong 
which makes it so hard for us to get credit." This 
"something" which makes it so difficult for these mer- 
chants to get the desired credit is the carelessness shown 
in the get-up of their correspondence stationery. 

In many instances, the appearance of the letters which 
merchants write to the manufacturers is so slip-shop and 
careless that the credit man rightly takes it for granted 
that that merchant is not running his business on lines 
which will enable him to take care of himself in compe- 
tition with twentieth century methods, and therefore he 
is doubly watchful before he will take this merchant as 
an acceptable risk. 

Nor is this effect of cheap stationery confined alone to 
dealings with the large manufacturers, but to the dealings 
with small customers, in the merchant's own city. If 
they receive letters and statements written on poor sta- 
tionery they will have a correspondingly poor opinion of 
the merchant's methods and they will regulate their deal- 
ings with him according to this standard. 

If, however, a merchant's stationery is neat, clean and 
attractive, it will at once produce a favorable impression 
both on the manufacturer and on the customer. The 
credit man will find it harder to refuse credit, and the 
small customer, impressed by the business-like appearance 
of letters and statements, will pay his bills more prompt- 
ly and place greater confidence in any statement which a 
merchant may make in his letter. 

Good business-like stationery is not expensive. In 
fact, it costs but little, if anything, more than cheap 
printing. Go to a good, reliable printer, and see to it 
that he gives you good service. An investment here will 
pay big dividends, but economy in stationery is a penny 
saved and dollars thrown away. 



THE TELEPHONE. 

ONE outward expression of the business is the girl who 
answers the telephone. What would you think if I 
told you that a prospective customer called you up 
the other day and that the nasty, harsh-voiced, ill-tem- 
pered treatment he received over the wire gave him a 
most disagreeable impression of your concern. 



He got neither the telephone connection, the informa- 
tion, nor the consideration he expected— and you did not 
get the business. By such a slender thread sometimes 
hangs an order. 

Or would you believe that a certain buyer intended to 
divide his order between your house and a competitor ; 
that jewel of a girl answered the 'phone; her well-modu- 
lated voice, her respectful interest in his behalf, put hin 
in a pleasant and receptive frame of mind. 

She said : "Mr. Blank is not in his office at the mo- 
ment, but I shall send for him at once." 

By being at the 'phone in person you got the entire 
order. Perhaps you recall the incident. 



PRICING STOCKS. 

THE inability to fix prices properly in one of the most 
prolific sources of failure in business." This remark 
was made by the manager of a large department 
store. In speaking of the various problems that confront 
the retailer, he said : "A great deal has been written 
on the subject of advertising, buying, and store manage- 
ment; but writers in trade journals have had very little 
to say about pricing goods. My experience has taught 
me that no branch of merchandising is more important or 
requires more careful study than does the pricing of the 
stock. Pricing goods is an art which requires much ex- 
perience and rare judgment. 

"In a great many stores it is the custom to fix 
prices on what is practically a horizontal basis of per- 
centage. The merchant estimates the running expenses of 
the store at, say 15 per cent, to this he adds his profits 
which we will also call 15 per cent. This makes a total 
of 30 per cent which is added to the cost price on every 
thin"- in the store. Of course there are a few exceptions, 
but the merchant may be said to have but one percentage 
of profit on his entire stock. It saves trouble, perhaps, 
to mark goods in this way, but it is extremely poor 
business policy. 

"There are many things to be taken into considera- 
tion in figuring prices. Competition is, perhaps, the 
strongest factor; but the nature of the goods and the de- 
mand for them are also important. Then, too, the style 
and popularity of goods give the price-maker an oppor- 
tunity to display his judgment. For instance, in a lot 
oi suits costing practically the same amount, some will, 
on account of the style, sell easily for a third more than 
others. The same is true of dress goods, silks, or in fact, 
almost any other class of merchandise. There are always 
some customers who are willing to pay a little more for 
style and the -merchant who does not take advantage of 
this fact is not alive to his own interests. By marking 
up the more salable goods he is enabled to reduce the 
selling price on goods that are less desirable. 

"Again, in pricing goods, the merchant will often 
find it a good advertising policy to mark certain articles 
clown to a very narrow margin of profit. This gives a 
store the best possible kind of advertising, but it also 
cuts down the average of profit and every merchant is in 



55 



Hardware and Metal 



THE OFFICE 



May 21, 1904. 



business for profit; so, if s«me goods are marked down, 
others must be marked up to maintain the average. 

"To sum the matter up, I would say that in making 
prices the merchant should use his judgment rather than 
a fixed scale. It is necessary to hold himself as nearly 
as possible to an average of profit but in different articles 
he should vary widely from the given percentage." 



CAPTAINS OF INDUSTRY OF TO-MORROW. 

IN the Atlantic Monthly for March, Mr. Henry A. 
Stimpson in his article on "The Small Business as a 
School of Manhood," asks the question : Inasmuch as 
the small business house is being replaced more and more 
bv the great corporations and the trusts, and inasmuch as 
the great commercial leaders of to-day were trained in 
this small business, what effect will come to the business 
world from the fact that the young men of to-day have 
not the opportunity of this training ? 

The problem is this : These few great corporations 
and trusts need men of remarkable superior ability and 
talent and wide experience to direct them. A man who 
has been a clerk all his life has gotten not only into the 
routine methods of a clerk, but his character has been 
more or less weakened by a lack of immediate responsi- 
bility, so that he is not fit for such a- position by the 
time he reaches his fortieth year. The very methods of 
the trust have made it impossible for a man to gain such 
experience and develop his ability in a business of his 
own. Where, then, are those few great men to be found ? 
The other day 1 asked the auditor of a great trust : 
"What is the method upon which your new business is 
being organized— to make a machine so perfect that no 
knave can take advantage of it, or to develop individual 
character to such an extent that the machinery will be 
relatively secondary ?" He looked at me for a moment, 
and then, with a curious smile, said : "The latter is 
what 1 should be glad to do, but my directors have dif- 
ferent ideas. We are trying to make a machine which 
will be as absolutely perfect as possible." "Then," I 
said, "you will be beaten, for a man is always cleverer 
than a machine." "Yes," he said, "I fear so." He has 
himself since resigned and gone back into private busi- 
ness. 



The great corporation is unquestionably the necessity 
of the hour. It will continue to take on constantly new 
forms of development. It is already playing and will 
continue to play a tremendous part in the progress of 
civilization. But its limitations are none the less real. 
The evils that are inevitably connected with it must be 
clearly realized if they are to be offset. Among them all 
none is so serious as this radical one of the effect upon 
the character of many of the employes, who, under form- 
er conditions, would have been either managing their own 
business or ambitious for the opportunity of doing so. 
The life, in a multitude of homes where the salary takes 
the place of business earnings, is doubtless calmer and 
steadier, and also in many cases ampler, in that the in- 
come is larger. A certain stability is hoped for in a so- 
ciety where anxiety over business conditions is exchanged 
for the contentment of an assured stipend. And the 
steadying and quieting of the temper, no longer made 
irritable by the daily anxiety, is unquestionably a notable 
social contribution. 



FAULTS AT THE START. 

MAX FRANKENSTEIN writes : "After six years of 
observation in several of the largest establishments 
in New York, I find the great fault with most hoys 
to be their fear of hard work or their bashfulness to do 
hard work; no matter which of the foregoing is the 
cause, they are all looking for 9-3 jobs— cinches, in plain 
words. Thev are filled with the idea that they know it 
all, and can, therefore, command large salaries. 

"Fortunate indeed is the young man, who, on leaving 
school, secures a position that nets him $5 per. 

"When we consider a little it is easy to see why 
large salaries are impossible. 

"First, the young man must learn his business (this 
takes time); then he must learn to work properly (more 
time required); packing goods while looking out of the 
window is not attention to the work in hand, and it 
takes time to work steady without fooling. So until the 
young nun learns his business and learns to work he is 
a loss to the firm. Hence the small salary. 

"Even if you start on a small salary (most of us 
started that way), don't wear that I-don't-care expres- 
sion, but put your shoulder to the wheel." 



ENGWALL LOOSE LEAF PRICE BOOK 

FLAT OPENING 




1 




\ 






























































o- 
































r 






31 
































3 
































- '' .:,) 








, .; ■ . 








L_ 









SHEET REMOVED OR 
INSERTED INSTANTLY 

SEND FOR DESCRIPTIVE PRICE LIST. 

TORONTO 



UATJI11 TJTTIT1PT T Manuf a c * u|, e r s Loose Leaf 

uAltl (X HmUMlL, Ledgers and all kinds of Binders 



Are You Neglecting 
Your Accounts? 

To have good collections you must render 
your accounts promptly and accurately on 
the frst of every month. With 

THE BRIGGS LEDGER SYSTEM 

you can do this. Write for our latest 
illustrated catalogue, free. 



The Briggs Ledger System Co., 

Limited 

75 York St., - Toronto, Can. 



56 



May 21, 1904. 



THE OFFICE 



Hardware and Metal 



This list Is for the purpose of placing retailers, 
manufacturers' jobbers and other readers in 
touch with reliable and competent accountants 
and auditors whose services are so frequently 
required for suoh purposes as opening books, 


Leading Canadian 
Accountants and .Auditors 


adjusting and auditing accounts, arranging part- 
nerships or organizing joint stock companies, 
devising special office systems, making collec- 
tions and investigations, handling estates, mak- 
ing valuations, etc. 


DAVID HOSKINS, F.C.A. 
Chartered Accountant, 
Auditor, 

Financial Valuator. 
207 Manning Chambers, City Hall Sq., 
Toronto, Canada. 


F. H. KIDD, 

Chartered Accountant, Auditor, 

Assignee, Etc. 

505 McKinnon Bldg., - Toronto. 


HENRY BARBER <fe CO., 

Accountants and Assignees. 

Offices : 

18 Wellington St. E., Toronto, Ont. 


GEO. O. MERSON, 

Chartered Accountant, 
Auditor, Assignee, etc. 


JENKINS & HARDY, 
Assignees, Chariered Accountants, 
Estate and Fire Insurance Agents. 

15>£ Toronto Street Toronto. 

465 Temple Building, Montreal. 

100 William Street, New York. 


WILLIAM FAHEY, 

Accountant and Auditor. 

402 McKinnon Building, Toronto. 


Regular and Special Audits. 

27 Wellington St. E., 

'Phone Main 4744. Toronto. 


Cable Address : " Wigwam." 
T. G. WILLIAMSON, 
Chartered Accountaut and Auditor, 
16 Toronto St., Toronto, Canada. 


This space $15 a year. 


This space f 15 a year. 


This space (15 a year. 



This list is for the purpose of placing manufac- 
turers, wholesale and retail merchants and other 
readers throughout Canada, and firms abroad 
doing business in Canada, in touch with the 
legal profession throughout the Dominion, for 
the collection of accounts, legal representation, 


LEGAL CARDS. 


organization of companies, the arrangement or 
dissolution of partnerships, or assignments, as 
well as all other matters of a legal nature. 

For advertising rates apply to MacLean Pub- 
lishing Co., Limited, Montreal or Toronto. 


BEATTY, BLAf KSTOCK, FASKEN JAS. H. BURRITT, K.C. 

& RIDDELL, Solicitor, Notary, Etc. 
BEATTY, BLACKSTOCK, CHAD- Pembroke, - - Ont. 
WICK & HALT, 


1. L. O. VIDAL. 
Barrister, Solicitor, etc. Collections 

and Commercial Law. 
Moutmagny and Quebec City, Que. 


J. C. HAMILTON. LL.B., 

Barrister, Solicitor and Notary. 

McKinnon Building, Toronto. 

'Phone, Main 65. 


Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. D Q CAMEKON| Barrister. 

Offices, Bank of Toronto, i Equity Chambers, Toronto. 
Tel., Main 3813. Toronto, ODt. Branch Office, Oakville, Ont. 


TTJPPER, PHIPPEN & TUPPER, 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 

Winnipeg - - Canada. 


ATWATER, DUCLOS k CHATJVIN 

Advocates. Montreal. 
Albert W. Atwater, Q. ' , Consulting 
Counsel for City of Montreal. Chas. 
A. Duclos. Henry N. Chauvin. 



•jp 1 . • -I -|-v . Tn e following Institutions for the education 
T Y dVJCcfctlOnSl XJ G P 3. r I 111 ©III. of business men's sons and daughters are 

' recommended by this paper : 


Do You Want to Learn Shorthand ? 

EVERYBODY NEEDS IT. 

It is an assistance to studeuts, teachers, lawyers, physicians, secre- 
taries, clergymen, editors, reporters, business man,— everybody in fact. 
We can teach you at home, the fastest, easiest system known 

BY MAIL 

Some of our pupils have written 100 words a minute by this system 
within a month. 

Write lor information about our Shorthand course. 

CANADIAN CORRESPONDENCE COLLEGE, Limited 

TORONTO, CANADA. 


Western Business College 

Cor. College and TAnAMTO 
Spadina avenue, ' V7I\.V71X | \J, 

Thorough courses in Bookkeeping, Stenography, Typewriting 
and Penmanship ; individual instruction. 

A. J. HOARE, Principal. 


St. Margaret's College, Toronto 

A Boarding and Day School for Girls. 
Thorough courses in every department. 
Only teachers of the highest academical and professional standing employed. 

GEORGE DICKSON, M.A., MRS. GEORGE DICKSON 

Director. Lady Principal. 


^ — ^ _j-j? * ^ Bookkeeping aud Shorthand are 
/\^/J , jfo jC~ffdsSs/2/2S*~^ sure Rte PPi n K' s tones to success, 
v _J/£/Lv/^fs£/iy& / Z/t / 0'fC / Z^f* Teachers who have had practical 
~^,^/y> , ^^>y business experience teach these 
branches in 

THE WILLIS BUSINESS COLLEGE. 

A school of genuine merit. Send for our beautiful catalogue. 
S. T. Willis, Principal, Cor. Bank and Albert Sts., OTTAWA. 


The Belleville Business College, 

Limited. 
BELLEVILLE, ONTARIO. 

Send for handsome catalogue l p_:iL. I.W-_. u A n i 
describing fully all courses J- rntfl JCttCfS, M. A., Principal 



I 

J 
I 

I The Bell Telephone Co. of Canada 



NEW TELEPHONE LINE 

A new copper metallic line has jus' been completed Irom 
Simcoe to Port Rowan. The towns listed below can now be 
reached from Toro to at the fa lowing rates : 

PORT ROWAN - 50c. 

8T. WILLIAMS - - 50c. 
VITTORIA • - 40c. 



Trade NA/ith England 

Every Canadian who wishes to trade successfully with the 
Old Country should read 

* * Commercial Intelligence • ■ 

(The address is 168 Fleet St., London, England.) 

The cost is only 6c. per week. (Annual subscription, including 
postage, 84.80.) 

Moreover, regular subscribers are allowed to advertise without 
charge in the paper. See the rules. 



57 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Roofing Felt Factory 

Harbor St., 



Montreal. 



Paper Manufacturers 



May 21, 1904. 

Paper Mills, 

Joliette, 
Quebec. 



Building Papers •»•"* 0,an """' 8ra »« Brown- Manilla Wrapping 

Ready Roofing ^$^ Hanging and Print, 

Pitch and Roofing Cement "ared felt. Colored Papers 

ALEX. McARTHUR & CO., Office 82 McGill St., Montreal 



LIMITED. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



May 21, 1904. 

These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices, lhe 
Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb, $30 00 $31 00 
TINPLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

41.L.S., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

I C, usual sizes $6 50 

IX " 8 00 

IX X " .....j 9 50 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

IC « 75 

IX 825 

IXX 9 75 

Raven and Vulture Grades— 

I C, usual sizes 4 25 

IX " 500 

IXX " 5 75 

IXXX " 6 50 

"Dominion Crown Best "—Double 

Coated, Tissued. p er DOX 

IC 5 50 

IX f 50 

XX 7 50 

Allaway's Best "—Standard Quality. 

IC 4 50 

IX 550 

IXX 6 50 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel — 

IC, usual size, 14x20 3 35 

I.C., special sizes, base 3 60 

20x28 7 10 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade — 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 7 50 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. ) 

" 14x60, " } •••• 7 00 

" 14x65, " ) 

Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 7 25 7 50 

"' 26 " 7 75 8 00 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 1 80 

Refined " " 2 20 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 25 

Hoop steel, 14 to 3-in. base 2 75 

Sleigh shoe steel, " 2 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

Reeled machinery 3 00 

Toe calk steel 285 300 

T. Firth&Co. stool steel, per lb 12 J 13 

Jessop's high speed steel 60 

standard tool steel 14 

" cruciblesheet steel 14 

Chas. Leonard's tool... 08 09 
Crucible Steel Co. 

Black Diamond 10 11 

Silversteel 13 

Special 17 

Rex high speed steel. . 65 75 

Self Hardening 45 50 

Sanderson's Crucible Tool OS 09 

Superior " 12 13 

Extra Anld 15 

Self Hardening. ... 45 50 

Rexhigh speed.... 65 76 

Jonas & Colver's tool steel .... 10 20 

"Air Hardening" .... 70 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 

Russia, Iron- 
Genuine 11 



BABBIT METAL. 

" Tandem," A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " 114 

Frictionless Metal " 23 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine, 40 

MetaUic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. 4 05 

Geo. Langwell & Son. 

No. 1 08 

No. 2 07 

No. 3 05} 

Extra 094 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

10 and 16 gauge 2 25 2 50 

18 gauge 2 30 2 50 

20 " 2 30 2 50 

22 to 24 gauge 2 35 2 70 

26 " 2 40 2 80 

28 2 40 2 90 

COPPER WIRE. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary 2 60 

All bright 3 50 

Galvanized Canada Plates- 
Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queen's 
Fleur-de-Lis. Gordon Crown. Comet Bell. Head 

16 gauge 3 65 

18 to 24 gauge . . 3 75 3 75 3 75 3 75 
26 " ,. 4 00 4 00 3 90 4 00 

28 " .. 4 25 4 25 4 05 4 25 

American brands, $4.00 for 28 gauge. 
Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb. 7 00 10 00 

} " 5 60 

5-16 " 4 45 

"I " 3 85 

7-16 " 3 70 

4 " ...... 3 55 

9-16 " 3 45 

I " 3 35 

f " 3 25 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting, car lots 13 75 

Bars. 

Out lengths, round, 4 to I in. . 21 00 23 00 
round and square, 

1 to 2 inches.... 21 00 23 00 



Sheet. 

Plain, 16 oz., 14x48 and 14x60 .... 20 00 

Plain, 14 oz 2100 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft, 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 22 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 21 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 20 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BRASS. 

Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 234 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 00 6 25 

Domestic " " 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-cwt. casks 6 15 6 50 

Part casks 6 50 7 00 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 20 3 30 

Bar.perlb 05 

Sheets, 2J lb. sq. ft., by roll 06i 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets 4c. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb. 7 50 8 00 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.; chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 174 P-c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 3 p.c. cash, freights equalized. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

BATH TUBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

baths. 

Standard Enameled. 

5i-ft. rolled rim, 1st quality 21 60 

5J '2nd " 17 85 

closets. Net. 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Simplex Syphon Jet 9 00 

Emb. " " " ..9 50 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain . . 6 00 

Low " " emb. .. 6 50 

Connection 1 25 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

Emb. " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 63 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 Oo 

IRON PIPE. 
Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

iinch 3 05 
2 07 
" 2 25 
" 2 50 
" 3 22 

1 " 4 58 

1} " 6 47 

lj " 7 85 

2 " 1105 

2* " 19 25 

3 " 22 75 

34 " 28 75 

4 ' 35 25 

44 " 4100 

5 " 44 00 

" 57 50 

58 



Galvanized pipe — 

i inch 2 88 

f " 3 11 

J " 3 42 

1 " 4 40 

1 " 6 35 

li " 8 80 

U " 10 75 

2 14 80 

Malleable Fittings— Discount 20 p.c. 

Cast Iron Fittings- 
Standard, 574 per cent.; unions,55 per cent.' 
on nipples, headers and flanged unions, 60 
per cent. 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work, dis. 60 & 10 p.c. 
Cushion work, discount 50 per cent. 
Fuller work, discount 70 per cent. 

6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 

Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount 60 
per cent. With, in lots of 2 dozen and over 
an extra discount of 10 per cent. 

J. M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis- 
count 55 per cent. 

Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 
discount 60 per cent. 

Kerr's special standard globes and angles, 
discount 60 per cent. 

Kerr'i Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc and 
heavy standard valves, discount 60 percent. 

Kerr's standard brass checks, discount 60 p.c. 

Kerr's standard brass disc steam radiator 
valves, discount 70 per cent. 

Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc radia- 
tor valves, discount 70 per cent. 

Kerr's quick - opening hot - water radiator 
valves, discount 70 and 10 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 
valves, brass, discount 55 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 
valves, I. B.B.M., discount 70 percent. 

J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent. 

Standard Radiator Valves, discount 60 per 
cent. 

Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount 65 
per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath co.k net 1 75 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No .7 Fuller's " 2 10 

No. 44, " " 2 25 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 
cock, hot and cold per doz. 15 00 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 
cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 55 percent. 
" " iron " " 50 to 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

RANGE BOILERS. 

Dominion, 30 gallon net 4 75 

35 " " 5 75 

40 " " 6 75 

Copper, 30 gallon " 22 00 

r ' 35 " " 24 00 

" 40 " " 28 00 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 

SOID PIPE AND FITTINGS. 
Light soil pipe, discount, 50 per cent. 

" " fittings, discount 50 and 10 p.c. 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 60 
per cent. 

7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

SOLDER. Per lb 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 19 

Bar, half-and-half, commercial 18 

Refined 18 

WRENCHES. 

Acme, dit xmnt 35 to 374 per cent. 
Agricultural, discount 60 per cent. 
Coe's Genuine, discount 20 to 25 pe cent. 

Towers' Engineer each 2 00 7 00 

S per doz. 5 80 6 09 

G. &K.'sPipe " .... S 40 

Burrell's Pipe each 1 00 

Pocket per doz. 25 2 90 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



steel STRUCTURAL steel 

We tender, and most times win out. Mostly a matter of willingness and business. 

If any hardware dealer can tell us of a chance to make money, we shall make him a partner in the 
job- and share profits — we do all the work, too. 



THE HAMILTON BRIDGE WORKS CO., LIMITED 

Use Long Distance Phone, Hamilton 630. HAMILTON, CANADA. 



PAINTS AND OILS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 
1-lb. tins, pure. 

Venetian red, per lb 08 

Chrome yellow « '» 

O.olden ochre » °° 

French " £ ™ 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green J " 

French permanent green u " 

Signwriters' black 15 

COLORS DRY. 
Pure in bbls., per cwt. Less than this 
quantity }c extra. 

Common ochre, bbls f ?»i 

Yellow ochre nli 

Brussels ochre ••■• * <| 

Venetian red 150 2 25 

English oxides * uu J x> 

American oxides 1 &> * '•> 

Canadian red oxides I 50 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c 2 00 

B ^=:::::::::::::::: eoo \Z 

Raw umber 6 00 7 00 

Drop black 12 00 

Chrome yellow « « 

Chrome greens j™ 

French green "J" 

Golden ochre i-.vv nkk ,i Ln 

Ultramarine blue, in 28-lb.bxs 7 00 10 00 

Fire proof mineral J 00 

Genuine Eng. Litharge 4 50 

Mortar color 1 00 

Pure Indian red. lb m 

Whiting, bbl b5 

English vermilion in 30-lb.bgs. ... 85 
WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure * 75 

N- 1 * >° 

No 2 425 

No! 3 '.'.'. 387i 

No. 4 3 50 

Munros Select Flake White 4 75 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure .... 4 75 

Monarch 5 00 

Decorator's Pure 4 7a 

Essex Genuine 4 zo 

Sterling Pure 5 00 

Island City Pure .. 5 00 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 4 75 n 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 4 50 4 7o 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $4 25 $4 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " .... 4 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 00 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 25 

WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 0B 08 

FrenchV.M 06 06J 

Lehigh 006 OOfii 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 4 50 

Pure, kegs 4 75 

No. 1, casks 4 25 

No. 1, kegs 4 50 

PREPARED PAINTS. 
In i, i and 1-gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 1 20 

Second qualities, per gallon 1 00 

Barn (in bbls.) 60 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 1 30 1 40 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 125 

Toronto Lead & Color Cos pure 1 25 

Sanderson Pearcy's pure 1 20 

Standard Co.'s "New Era." 130 

" Globe " barn 60 70 

Francis-Frost Co.'s "Ark" B'd — 1 25 

" British Navy deck 1 50 

Henderson & Potts's "Anchor" 135 

Ramsay's paints, Pure, per gal ' 1 20 

Thistle, ,r .... 1 00 

Outside, bbls 55 65 

Island City House Paint 1 25 

Floor " 1 25 

Sterling House Paint. 120 

" Floor " 1 10 

National 1 05 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 45 

Bulk in less quantity 1 70 

Bladders in bbls 1 V0 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 1 85 

25-lb. tins 1 80 

124 lb. tins 2 05 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 1 85 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 150 160 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

No. 1 90 100 

Hard oil finish 1 35 1 50 

Lightoilfinish 160 170 

Damar 175 2 00 

3heUac, white 2 40 2 50 

orange 230 240 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

'' No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each . . 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels ; size 1, $1.20 ; 

size 2, 70c.; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal., $2.50. 

GLUE. 

Common 08 084 

French medal 10 14 

White.extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 



HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION. 

Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 and 25 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 40 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion. 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, add 5 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p.c, Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades,25 per cent. discount. 
Rival and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on 
list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.; American, $1.75 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

i-lb. bags *0 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Phin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 



ADZES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 103 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 091 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11} 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes ." 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 10 00 

AMERICAN AXE AND TOOL CO. 

Red Ridge, boys, handled 5 75 

" hunters 5 25 

AXLE GREASE 

Ordinary, per gross 600 700 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 

BELLS. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 63J per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 50 and 10 
per cent, off new list. 

Farm. 
American, each 1 25 3 00 

House. 
American, per lb 35 40 

BELLOWS. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent 

BELTING. 

Extra, 60 per cent. 

Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour's, diseourt 60 per cent. 
Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour s, 47} per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07$ 12 

BOLTS and nuts Per cent. 

Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) 

" 3-16 and} 60 

" 3-16 and J 55 and 5 

" " 7-16 and up 55 

" " full sq. ($2.40 list) 60 

" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, j and 

less 60 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

Bolt Ends 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, ail sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods per lb., 5$ to 6c. 
boot calks. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS. 

Discount fi2J per cent. 

59 



BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 9 00 

American " 12 00 18 00 

BUTCHER KNIVES. 

Bailey's per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 85 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll i 15 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 0C 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. &I. X. L.... " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized ' 400 "' 45 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 •' 100 

Oiled " " 400 " 70 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 1 10 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper, $2.00 for 2}-inch, and $1.9 or 2-incri. 

BUTTS. 
Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount. 60 per cent 

Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and 24 per cent. 
Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 2} per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70, 70 and 5 percent 
Gen. Bronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 100 150 

Bullard's " 6 50 

CASTORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 57} per cent. 
Plate, discount 52} to 57} per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS- 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 8 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 
Socket, Framing acd Firmer. 
Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

FOODS— STOCK. 

Colonial Stock Foods, 10c. packages, 

per doz $4 CO 

" " " 25c. pkgs., " 2 00 

" " 10c. " " 76 

" " " 25-lb. pail, each 1 30 

Poultry Foods, 25c. packages 1 25 

Cough Powders, per doz 1 2 i 

Worm ' " I 26 

Internation 1 Stock Foods, $1 packages, 

per doz , a 8 00 

International Stock Foods, perp il 2 75 

per bbl .... 10 50 

Poultry " Slpkgs ,ptrdz. 8 00 

" Worm Powders,50c.nkgs. " 4 00 

Pine Healing Oil. per doz . . . 8 00 

Pheno-Chloro,$lpkgs.,perdoz 8 00 

Hoof Ointment 8 00 

" Compound Absorbent 16 00 

Also 25c. pkgs. at $2 per doz. 50c. pkgs. at 
4 per doz. 

CLIPS 

Axle, discount 65 per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



Two Paper Mills and Three Factories Busy 

making Paterson's Wire -Edged Ready Roofing, Building Papers 
and Roofing Felts. 

Our success is due to the fact that we make the goods the people want, 
and our customers know their orders will be promptly and carefully filled. 

The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto and Montreal. 



COMPASSES, DIVIDERS, ETC. 

American, discount 62} to 65 per cent. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

Plain or Corrugated. 
2-inch per 100 feet 

3 " " " 

4 " 



3 00 

4 00 

5 25 

6 75 
9 00 



CRADLES, GRAIN. 
Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 



8. &D., No. 3... 
8. SD., " 5... 
S. &D., " 6... 
Boynton pattern . 



. per pa 



174 

22} 
15 
20 



DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey's Rod per doz 1 75 

Coil, 9 toll in " 95 1 65 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 
Coach and Wagon, discount 50 per cent. 

Carpenters' discount 60 and 10 per eent. 

DRILLS. 

Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 
Morse, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FAUCETS. 
Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUGHS. 

10-inch per 100 ft. 10 00 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 20 

7-inch " 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS 

Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 

Disstons 70 " 10 " 

American 70 " 10 

J. Barton Smith 70 " 10 

MoClellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jovritt's, English list, 23 to 274 per cent. 
Nicholson File Co 's " Simplicity " tile handle, 

per gross 85c. to SI. 50 



GAUGES. 
Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley s. discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 2 40 

OILLETTS POWDERED LYE. 

1-case, $3.60; 3-case, $3.50; 5-case and over, 
$3.40. 

HALTERS. 

Rope, i-inch per gross 

Rope, | " 

Rope, f to |-inch " 

Leather. 1-inch per doz. 

Leather, 1} " " 

Web " 

HAMMERS. 

Nail. 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 27} per cent 
Tack. 

Magnetic per doz. 

Sledge. 

Canadian per lb. 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian, per lb. 
HANDLES. 





GLASS. 






Window. 


Box Price 










Star 


D. Diamond 


Size United 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Per 


Inches. 


50 ft. 


100 ft. 50 ft. 


100 ft. 


*uder 26 




3 80 




5 06 


•J6 to 40 




4 00 




5 44 


41 to50 




4 .50 




6 56 


51 to 60 




4 75 




7 50 


61 to 70 




5 00 




8 62 


71 to 80 




5 30 




9 38 


81 to 85 








10 75 


86to<>o 








12 30 


91 to 95 








15 00 


96tO 100 ... 








18 00 



12 00 
9 00 
14 00 

4 00 

5 20 
2 45 



1 10 1 20 



07} 08} 



22 25 



Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 


3 00 
1 00 


4 00 
1 50 


Fork. 






C. & B., discount 40 per cent, 


revised list. 


Hoe. 






O. & B., discount 40 per cent., 


revised list. 


Saw. 






American per do» 


1 00 


1 25 


Plane 






American per gross 


3 15 


3 75 


Hammer and Hatchet. 




Canadian, discount 40 per cent 






HANGERS. 


do/.. 


pairs. 




800 


10 00 




4 50 
6 00 
9 00 


Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-foot run 

No. 11}, 10-foot run 

No. 12, 10-foot run 

No. 14, 15-foot run 

•' track, 1 x 3-16 indOO ft) 
" ljx3-16in(100ft) 


4 00 


8 40 

10 80 
12 60 
21 00 

11 00 

3 75 

4 75 


HARVEST TOOLS 






Discount 60 per cent. 






HATCHETS. 






Canadian, discount 40 to 42} per cent 





it Id per cent. 



HAT ENAMEL. 

Henderson & Potts' "Anchor Brand 



Blind, Parker's, discount 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06} 

5-in., " 06} 

6-in., ' 06 

8-in., " 05| 

10-in., " 05} 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per cent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in. up " ... 3 25 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs 10 50 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 

Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW ware. 

Tinned cast, 35 per cent. 

HOOKS. 

Cast Iron. 

Bird oage per doz. 50 1 10 



Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat . . per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 60 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 60 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 60 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand, 40, 10 and 7} percent, off list f Oval 
"M" brand, 55, per cent. I head 

Countersunk, 57} per cent. 
"Monarch," 50 and 7} per cent. 
"Peerless ' 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 

J ight, medium and heavy 3 65 3 90 

Snow shoes 3 90 4 15 

Steel Shoes. 

XL, sizes 1 to 5 5 35 

Light, No. 2 and larger 3 80 

No. 1 and smaller 4 05 

Featherweight, all sizes to 4 5 35 

Toeweight, all sizes 1 to 4 6 60 

JAPANNED WARE. 

Discount 50 percent. 

ICE PICKS. 
Star per doz. 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 

Brass spun 7} per cent, discount off new list. 

Copper per lb. 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 per cent. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet, trunk and padlock, 
American per gross 60 

KNOBS. 

Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine ... . " 600 900 
Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw per gross 1 30 00 

White door knobs per doz 00 

HAY KNIVES. 

Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS. 

Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast perdoz. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. - 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined perdoz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 1 87 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LINEj. 

Fish per gross 1 05 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LAWN MOWERS. 

Woodyatt, 10}-in. wheel. 14-in. cut . . 8 50 
Star, 9 -in. " " . . 7 00 

Daisy. 8 -in. " " (net) 2 87} 

Philadelphia.7}-in. " " ..700 

Ontario, 7} in. . . 15 80 

King Edw'd, 12-in. " " ..950 

Discount, 50 per cent., with freight conces- 
sions in quantity shipments. 

Maxwell & Sons : 

10'/ 2 -in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 4 90 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, 50 to 50 and 10 per cent- 
Russell & Er win ...perdoz. 



Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 6 00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' per doz. 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per doz. 5 50 ( 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

American, discoun 3j per cent. 

German, 15 per ceu 

Gem each 1 15 

MILK CAN TRIMMlNGd. 

Discount 25 per cent. 

nails. Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d 3 30 3 45 

3d 2 95 3 12 

4and5d 2 70 2 95 

6 and 7d 2 60 2 80 

8 and 9d 2 45 2 SO 

10 and 12d 2 40 2 55 

16and20d 2 35 2 50 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 30 2 45 

Cut nails in carlots 5c. less. 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.40. 

Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount ?5 per cent. 

Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent. 

nail pullers. 
German and American 1 75 2 50 

NAIL SETS. 

Square, round and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 

Diamond 1 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 per cent. 
2-in. Mesh, 16 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.o. 

OAKUM. 

U. S. Navy per 100 lb 6 75 

Plumbers " 3 00 

OILERS. 
McClary ? Model galvanized 

oil can, with nump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent, 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent. 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount 45 per cw* 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cent. 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. 

Per dozen 600 900 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 1 00 

PICTURE WIRE. 

Tin and gilt, discount 75 per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

} pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

1 " " " .... 9 60 

PLANES. 

Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cen'., 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 37} U 

40 per cent 



60 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Ae/?l//l€ >tO/? Double Hammer Guns 

V^ W ^^^S J ^^ m ^~ *~* ARE PREFERRED 



Because 
they retail 
at a 

moderate 
price. 




Because 

of their wearing 

and shooting 

qualities 



Because they have the reputation of "Standing the Racket." 

REMINGTON ARMS OO., ILION, IM.Y. 

Agency: 313 Broadway, New York. Depot: 86-88 First St., San Francisco, Cal. 



PLANE IRONS. 

English perdoz. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 
374 to 40 per cent. 

Button s imitation perdoz. 5 00 MOO 

German " "60 bO 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Discount 20 per ceut. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse per doz. 55 1 00 

Axle 22 33 

Screw 9 '«''. J 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 360 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers perdoz. 100 185 

Conductors 3 00 Id 00 

Tinners', solid perset .... 72 

" hollow per inch 100 

RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up 

razors. per doz. 



4 00 
4 00 
7 50 
12 50 
3 60 
7 00 



8 50 



18 00 
18 00 

11 00 
15 00 
10 00 

12 00 
15 00 
10 75 

13 00 
13 50 
13 50 
10 50 



Elliot's 

Geo. Butler's & Co. s 

Boker's 

" King Cutter 

Wade & Butcher's 

Theile & Quack's 

Carbo Magnetic 

Griffon Barber's Favorite . . . 

Griffon No. 65 

Griffon Safety Razors 

Griffon Stropping Machines. 
Lewis Bros ' " Klean Kutter' 

REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, Jc. 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in J-lb cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 45 

per cent, discount. Cartons, lc. per lb. 

extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 and 10 per i ent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, 4-lb. 

cartons, lc. per lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 374 Per cent. 

ROPE, ETC. 

Sisal 114 

Pure Manilla Hi 

"British" Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 

" 5-32 inch 25 

i inch 25 

Russia Deep Set 15 

Jute 08 

Lath Yam, single 104 

double 11 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 80 

" 72 feet " 95 

RULES. 

Boxwood, discount 55 per cent. 
Ivory, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 80 

No. 50, nickle-plated, " 90 

Common, plain 4 50 

plated 5 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. ' 

B. t A. sand, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
Bmery, discount 40 per cent. 
Oarnet (Rurton s) a to 10 per cent, advance 
co list 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

"Eureka" tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston's, discount 124 per cent 
S. & D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's per foot 35 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only each 50 125 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 28 30 

SAW SETS. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X-CutSets, " '. 7 50 

SCALES. 

Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 

Gurney Champion, 50 per ceDt. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cenc. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 

Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 
" Dominion, discount 55 per cent 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 per cent. 
" " Champion, discount 50 per cent. 

" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

-Sargent's per doz. 65 1 00 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 
stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 50 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, yellow and 
green stained, 4-in. style — perdoz. 6 75 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 
colors, oil finish per doz. 8 75 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 

Wood, F. H, bright and steel, discount 874 

per cent. 
Wo'od, R. EL, bright, dis. 824 pei cent. 
F H., brass, dis. 80 percent. 
" R. H, " dis. 75 per cent. 
' F. H, bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
' R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 874 per cent. 

Bench, wood perdoz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Perdoz.net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, discou 

and 24 ner cent. 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 674 

per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

Cast iron, 16 x 24 85 

18x30 100 

18x 36 1 40 

SNAPS. 

Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 

Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 14-lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over " .... 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493 perdoz. 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 to 60 and 5 per cent. 
Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 524 per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 124 per cent, off re 

vised list 
Returned, discount 75 per cent off -eviged list 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 par cent. 

STONE. 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " o9 09 

Labrador " • • • 13 

Axe " .... 11 

Turkey " .... 30 

Arkansas " 150 

Water-of-Ayr " • ■ ■ • 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind,2-in.,40to2001b.,perton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb„ " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4, 3 doz. in case, .net cash 4 80 

No. 6, 3 doz. in ase. . " ■ ■■• 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and i5 

tinned 80 and 20 

(in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

" J weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 124 and 124 

" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12J 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacKS . 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 524 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads *0 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

" solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers.. 90 and 10 

•• " " bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chestermau's each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

p er doz 3 00 15 00 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 and 10 
per cent. 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N., P. S. & W., 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 724, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, discount 10 per cent. 

Germau per doz. 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton. 3-ply 24 

"" " 4-ply 27 

Mattress per lb. 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 134 

Brook's 12J 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 350 

fr •• ' " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise * 50 9 00 

Columbia Hardware Co. 
Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

" uarallel (discount) 45 per cent. 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 

10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent, discount 

50, 10 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
" Star " decorated steel and decorated white, 

25 per cent. 



Smooth Steel Wire. 
No. 0-9 gauge $2 50 

10 " 6c. extra. 

11 " 12c. " 

12 " 20c. 

13 " 30c. 

14 " 40c. 

15 " 55c. 

16 " 70c 

Add 60c. for coppering and 82 for tinning. 
Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c., 
spring wire SI. 25, special hay baling wire 30c, 
best steel wire 75c, bright ioft drawn 15c, 
charcoal (extra quality) $1.25, packed in casks 
or cases 15 ., bagging and papering 10c, 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb. 
hanks, 50c, in 4-lb. hanks 75c, in i-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 
$5— No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, 86— No. 20, $6.65— 
No. 21, 97— No. 22, 87.30— No. 23, $7,65— No. 
24, SS-No. 25, $9— No. 26, $9.50-No. 27, 
810— No. 28, $11— No. 29, $12-No. 30, $13— 
No.31, $14— No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16— No. 34, 
$17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos. 17,-25, 
$2— Nos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered, 
5c— oiling, 10c — in 25-lb. bundles, 15c — in5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c— in lib. hanks, 25c. 
— in 4-lb. hanks, 38c. — in i-lb. hanks, 50c — 
packed in casks or cases, 15c — bagging or 
papering, 10c. 
Brass wire, discount 60 per cent, off the list. 
Copper wire, discount 60 per cent, net cash 

30 days, f.o.b factory. 
Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5, 
$3.70 to $3.70— Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 to S3. 15 
—No. 9, $2.55 - No. 10, $3.20 to §3.20 
—No. 11, $3.25 to $3 25 - No. 12, $2.6 C 
—No. 13, $2.75— No. 14. $3.75 to $3.75— No 
15, $4.30— No. 16. $4.30. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2,274 f.o.b. Cleveland. In carlots 
124c less. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18. J2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hollow 
6 strand. No. 17, $4.30; No. 18, $2.70; No. 
19, $2.35 ; No. 20, $2.30, f.o b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb 2 75 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 80 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 554 ' n 
less than carlots, and $2 45 in carlots. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9 $2 70 

No. 11 3 3o 

No. 12 2 95 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft. , net . . 1 50 
Terms, 2 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASHING MACHINES 

Round, re-acting, per doz 

Square " io no 

Eclipse, per doz • ■ • • 4 

Dowswell " 3b 0) 

New Century, per doz 7. UO 

WRINGERS. 

Leader perdoz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian •••• "™ 

Royal American ••■• j* "" 

Sampson ••■• JJ JJJ 

Lightning — *' w 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 da«rf. 

WROUGHT IRON WA9BERS. 

Canadian make. di«connt40 per cent 



61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



Abbey Improved Chilled Shot Co 9 

Accountants ft Auditors 57 

Adams Co 45 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 44 

American Steel and Wire Co 5 

Atkins, E. C, & Co 53 

Atlas Mfg. Co 53 

Auer Light Co 8 

Barnett. G. & H. Co outside back cover 

Bartlett, Wm., k Son 64 

Bat ton-Gillette Horse Clipping Co 51 

Barristers 57 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co 45 

Baynes, Charles 53 

Belleville Business College 57 

Bell Telephone Co 57 

Bird, J. A. & W., & Co 43 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co 2 

Bliss. R., .Mfg. Co 64 

Boker, H., & Co outside front cover 

Booth Copper Co 53 

Bowman, John, Hardware k Coal Co.. 6 

Bradstreet's 64 

Briggs Ledger System Co 56 

Butler, Geo., & Co 47 

Canada Corundum Co 19 

Canada Foundry Co 19 

Canada Hardware Co 43 

Canada lion Furnace Co 30 

Canada Linseed Oil Mills 39 

Canada Metal Co 19 

Canada Paint Co 42 

Canada Paper Co 9 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co . . . 7 

Canadian Corr. College 57 

Canadian Oil Co 39 

Canadian Oliver Typewiiter Co 54 

Canadian Rubber Co 1 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co. 53 

Cole, G. W., & Co 54 

Consumers' Cordage Co 4 

Contract Record 53 

Covert Mfg. Co 44 



Cullen, Orlan Clyde 64 

Cutts, C. M. & Co 49 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 45 

Deseron'o Iron Co 30 

Dods, P. D., & Co 41 

Dominion Belting Co 21 

Dominion Radiator Co. outside front cover 

Dominion Wire Mfg Co 8 

1 dindas Axe Works 9 

Enterprise Mfg. Co 62 

Erie Specialty Co 64 

Fairbanks Co 16 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co 44 

Gibb, Alexander 64 

Gillett, E. W., Co,, Ltd '... 43 

Globe Brass Works 21 

Grand River Metal Works 6 

Greening, B., Wire Co 8 

Grose, Walter 32 

Grove Chemical Co 41 

Gurney Foundry Co 47 

Gurney Scale Co 51 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside back cover 

Hallwood Cash Register Co 54 

Hamilton Bridge Works Co 59 

Hamilton Mica Roofing Co 52 

Hamilton Steel and Iron Co 16 

Hanover Portland Cement Co 53 

Harkins k Willis 44 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co 21 

Hart k Riddell 56 

Heinisch, R., Sons Co 21 

Henderson k Potts Co 40 

Howland, H. 8., Sons k Co 15 

Hvde, F. & Co 30 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 38 

Ironside, Son & Co 64 

Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle Works. . 14 

Ives, H. R. Co 43 



Jackson, C. F.. & Co. 
Jardine, A. B., k Co. 
Jenking, AC 



Kemp Mfg. Co 10 

Kerr Engine Co 19 

Leslie, A. C, k Co 31 

Lewis Bros. & Co 3 

Lewis, Rice, & Son inside front cover 

London Fence Machine Co . 31 

London Rolling Mill Co. .inside back cover 

Luf kin Rule Co inside back cover 

Luxfer PriBm Co 43 

Lysaght, John outside front cover 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co 9 

Maxwell, D., k Sons 5 

Merrick, Anderson k Co 37 

Metallic Roofing Co 33 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co 51 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co 32 

Morton, B. K., & Co 31 

McArthur, Alex., & Co 58 

McArthur, Corneille & Co 39 

McCaskill, Dougall & Co : 41 

McClary Mfg. Co 24 

McDougall, R., Co 31 

McGregor-Banwell Fence Co 9 

McNally, W„ k Co 57 

Newman, W., k Song 19 

Nobles k Hoare 41 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 31 

Oakey, John, k Sons 53 

Oil and Colourman's Journal 41 

Oneida Community 8 

Ontario Silver Co 9 

Ontario Tack Co 12 

Ormsby. A. B., Co 53 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 9 



Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co 45 

Parsons-Irons Co 9 

Paterson Mfg. Co 60 

Pedlar People 49 

Penberthy Injector Co 19 

Phillips, Chas. D 53 

Philip, David 32 

Pullman Mnfg. Co 19 

Ramsay, A., & Son 47 

Remington Arms Co 61 

Rogers, Henry, k Sons 49 

Russell k Erwin Mfg. Co 2 

Sadler k Haworth outside back cover 

Samuel, M. k L., Benjamin, k Co 2 

Sel's Commercial 57 

Seymour, Henry T. , Shear Co 21 

Sherwin-Williams Co 13 

Silberstein. A. L, k Co 1 

Slinysby, H. C 19 

Smith, Geo. J 54 

Smith, Hemenway & Co 32 

Solarine Metal Polish 41 

Spramotor Co 38 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works. .. 41 

Stephens, G. F., k Co 37 

St. George, H. E 38 

St. Margaret's College 57 

Syracuse Smelting Works 21 

Taylor-Forbes Co 10 

Taylor, J. & J 54 

Thompson.B. k S. H.,Co.outside back cover 

Thorne, R. E „ 41 

Wallace Barnes Co 9 

Walter, E. F., k Co 5 

Weese, G. A., k Son 54 

Western Business College 57 

Western Foundry Co inside back cover 

Western Wire Nail Co 9 

White Mountain Freezer Co 24 

Wilcox Mfg. Co 16 

Willis' Business College 57 

Wright, E. T., k Co 44 




STANDARD 
FOR QUALITY 



ICE SHREDDERS 

For Shaving Ice, Coarse or pine. 



LAWN SPRINKLER 




No. 33, Tinned, 
No. 34, Nickeled, 

FOOD CHOPPERS 




No. 1, 




Rapid Grinding and 

Pulverizing Mill./* 

45 Sizes and Styles for Hand, Steam and 
Electric Power. 



$3.50 

CHERRY STONERS 

5 Sizes and Styles, Tinned or Japanned 




No. 2, 
ORDER THROUGH YOUR JOBBER. 




$3.75 Nq j f _ $7.50 per Doz. 

CATALOGUE MAILED FREE. 



THE ENTERPRISE MFG. CO. OF PA., PHILADELPHIA, U. S. A. 



62 



May 21, 1904. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Accountants and Auditors. 

Barber, Henry & Co., Toronto. 
Fahey, Win., Toronto. 
Hoskins, David, Toronto. 
Jenkins k Hardy, Toronto. 
Kidd, F. H., Toronto. 
Merson, Geo. O., Toronto. 
Williamson, T. G., Toronto. 
Anvils. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Art Glass 

St. George, H. E., London, Ont. 

Axes. Hatchets, Scythes, etc, 

American A.xe and Tool Co., Montreal. 
Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

Babbitt Metal. 
Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co. , Montreal and Toronto. 
Langwell's, Montreal. 
Syracuse Smelting Works, Montreal. 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Atwater, Duclos k Chauvin, Montreal. 
Beatty, Blackstock, Fasken k Riddell, 

Toronto. 
Burritt, James H., K.C., Pembroke, Ont. 
Cameron, D. O., Toronto. 
Hamilton, J. C, Toronto. 
Tupper, Phippen k Tupper, Winnipeg. 
Vidal, I. L. O., Montmagny and Quebec. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Dominion Belting Co.. Hamilton. 
Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Toronto. 
Pullman Mfg. Co., Rochester, N.Y. 
Sadler k Haworth, Montreal k Toronto. 

Bicycles and Sundries. 

Canada Cycle and Motor Co., Toronto. 
Millen, John, k Son, Montreal. 

Bird Cages. 

Wright, E. T., k Co., Hamilton. 

Box Straps. 

Warminton, J. N., Montreal, Que. 

Brass Goods. 

Jones k Barclay, Birmingham. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Nicklin, J., & Co., Birmingham, Eng. 
Penberthy Injector Co.. Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Brushes and Brooms. 

United Factories, Toronto. 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies. 

Atkins, E. C, k Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Baynes, Chas., Blackburn, Eng. 
Bliss, R., Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, R.I. 
Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Howland, H. S. Sons k Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 
Ives, H. R. Co., Montreal. 
Lamplough, F. W. & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros, k Co. , Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
McNally, W., k Co., Montreal. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 
Metal Shingle k Siding Co.. Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Roofing Co. , Toronto. 
Newman k Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Ormsby, A. B., k Co., Toronto. 
Pedlar People, Oshawa, Ont. 
Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 
Stanley Rule k Level Co., New Britain. 

Conn. 
Taylor-Forbes Co. , Guelph, Ont. 
Wilcox Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Carpet Stretcher. 

Grand River Metal Works, Gait, Ont. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Warnock, James, k Co., Gait, Ont. 

Cash Registers. 
Hallwood Cash Register Co., Toronto. 

Churns. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co.,Nashua,N.H. 
Barton-Gillette Horse Clipping Co., Lon- 
don, Eng. 
Boker, Henry, Montreal. 
Burman k Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 

Cordage. 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Corundum. 

Canada Corundum Co., Toronto. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 
Birkett, Thos., k Son Co., Ottawa. 
Boker, Henry, Montreal. 
Butler, Geo., k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Lamplough, F. W., k Co., Montreal. 
Silberstein, A. L., New York. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 
Walter, E. F., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Wiebusch 4 Hilger, New York. 



Educational. 

Belleville Business College, Belleville. 
Canadian Corr. College, Toronto. 
St. Margaret's College, Toronto. 
Willis Business College, Ottawa, Ont. 
Western Business College, Toronto. 

Electric fixtures. 

Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh k Co., Montreal. 

Electro-Pla ting. 
Sutherland, D., Toronto. 

Engravers. 
Legg Bros. , Toronto. 
Smith, Geo. J., New York. 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co., G. k H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Financial Institutions. 

Bradstreet Co. 

British America Assurance Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto. 
Confederation Life Ass., Toronto. 
Liverpool k London k Globe Ins. Co., 

Toronto. 
London Guarantee and Accident Ins. 

Co., Toronto. 
Metropolitan Bank, Toronto. 
Western Assurance Co., Toronto. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Abbey Improved Chilled Shot Co., New- 
castle-on-Tyne, Eng. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 

Harrington k Richardson Arms Co., 
Worcester, Mass. 

Iver Johnson '8 Arms and Cycle Works, 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

Remington Arms Co., Iliou, N.Y. 

Savage Arms Co., Utica, N.Y. 

Union Metallic Cartridge Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Walter, E. F, k Co., Montreal. 

Flat Irons. 
Ives, H. R., Co., Montreal. 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lamplough, F. W, & Co., Montreal. 
Russell k Erwin Mfg. Co., New Britain, 

Conn. 
Smith k Hemenway Co. , New York. 

Gas Lamps and Sundries. 

Auer Light Co.. Montreal. 

Glue. 

Grove Chemical Co., Lancashire, Eng. 

Gold Enamel. 

Ridout, Geo., k Co., Toronto. 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Horseshoe Pads. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co. , Montreal. 
Peck Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Ice Cream Freezei s. 

White Mountain Freezer Co., Nashua, 
N. H. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bav Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Keys. 
Millen, John k Son, Montreal. 

Lanterns. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
vVright, E. T., k Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Ledgers and Office Stationery. 
Briggs Ledger System Co., Toronto. 
Hart k Riddell, Toronto. 
Weese.G. A. k Son, Toronto. 

Lumbermen' s Supplies. 

Birkett, Thos., k Son Co., Ottawa. 
Wamock, Jas., k Co., Gait. 

Lye. 

Gillett, E. W., Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Machinery. 

Canada Foundry Co. , Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Globe Brass Works, Detroit. 
Jardine, A. B., & Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerrille, Ont. 
Morrow MachineScrew Co., Ingersoll, Ont. 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., 

Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor. 



Mantels. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Gilib, Alexander, Montreal. 
Philip, David, Winnipeg. 

Metals. 

Booth Copper Co., Toronto. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto, Ont. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Ironside, Son k Co., London, Eng. 

Jackson, C. F., k Co., Vancouver, B.C. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Leslie, A. C. k Co., Montreal. 

London Rolling Mills Co., London, Ont. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Morton, B. K, k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Peck Rolling Mills, Montreal. 
Rogers, Henry, Sons k Co., Montreal. 
Samuel, Benjamin k Co., Toronto. 
Thompson, B. k S. H. k Co.. Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Pedlar People, Oshawa, Out 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Falkiner, H. F. Toronto. 

Oakey, John, k Sons, London, Eng. 

Metallic Window Screens. 

Cutts, C. M., k Co., Toronto Junction. 

Milk Cans and Trimmings. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
McClaryMfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Paints, Oils and Glass, 

Berry Bros., Detroit and Wallaceburg. 
Canada Linseed Oil Mills, Montreal. 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Oil Co. , Toronto. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co. , Toronto. 
Dods, P. D., k Co., Montreal. 
Francis-Frost Co. , Toronto. 
Henderson & Potts, Montreal and 

Halifax. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. C, k Co., Montreal. 
Lucas, John, &Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Corneille & Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill, Dougall & Co., Montreal. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 
Nobles & Hoare, London, Eng. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay & Son, Montreal. 
Ridout, Geo., k Co., Toronto. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works, 

Windsor, Ont. 
Stephens, G. F., &Co., Winnipeg. 
Thorne. R. E., Montreal. 

Patent Solicitor. 

Cullen, Orlan Clyde, Washington, D.C. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Supplies. 

Jardine, A. B., k Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Portland Cement. 

Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 
Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 
McNally, W., k Co., Montreal. 
Thompson, B. k S. H. k Co., Montreal. 

Radiators, Furnaces, Stoves, 
Tinware, etc. 

Adams Co., Dubuque, Iowa. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Dominion Radiator Co., Toronto, Ont. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co., Toronto. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 
Western Foundry Co., Wingham. 
Wright, E. T.,& Co., Hamilton. 

Refrigera tors. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 

Roofing Supplies. 

Bird. J. A & W., & Co., Boston. 
Hamilton Mica Roofing Co., Hamilton. 
Jenking, A. C, Montreal. 
Lockerby k McComb. Montreal. 
McArthur, Alex.. & Co., Montreal 
Metal Shingle k Siding Co. .Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto. 
Ormsby, A. B., k Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto k Montreal. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Sales. 

Taylor, J. k J., Toronto. 

Saws 

Atkins, E. C, &Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Scales. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Gumey Scale Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 



Screen Doors and Windows. 

United Factories, Toronto. 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co., 
Ingersoll, Ont. 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamilton 
Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 
McNally k Co., Montreal. 

ShelfBoxes. 

Bennett Mfg. Co., Pickering, Ont. 

Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Grand River Metal Works, Gait, Ont. 

Silver-Plated Ware. 

Ontario Silver Co., Niagara Falls. 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Toronto. 
Standard Silver Co., Toronto. 

Spramotors. 

Spramotor Co., London, Ont 

Sporting Goods. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. 

Springs. 

Wallace, Barnes Co.. Bristol, Conn. 

Stamps, Stencils, etc. 

Parsons-Irons Co., Toronto. 

Steel Castings. 

Hamilton Bridge Works, Hamilton. 
Hamilton Steel and Iron Co., Hamilton. 
Montreal Steel Works, Montreal. 

Steel Rails. 

Jackson, C. F., & Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Morton, B. K., & Co., Sheffield, Eng. 

Nova Scotia Steel k Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stock Food. 

Colonial Stock Food Co. , Toronto. 
International Stock Food Co., Toronto. 

Store Lighting. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Structural Iron and Steel Work. 

Hamilton Bridge Works Co., Hamilton. 

Tents, Awnings, etc. 

Bartlett, Win., & Son, Toronto. 

Toasters 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Harkins k Willis, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Traps. 

Mast, J. M.. Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. 

Vises. 

Lamplough, F. W., k Co., Montreal. 

Wall Paper. 

Staunton's Limited, Toronto. 
Warehouse Trucks. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Slingsby, H. C, Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., k Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Bowman, John, Hardware k Coal Co 

London, Ont. 
Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Caverhill, Learmont k Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. S., Sons k Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros, k Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

American Steel and Wire Co., New 

York, Montreal, Chicago. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., Loudon, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Ironside, Son k Co., London, Eng. 
London Fence Machine Co. .London, Ont. 
McGregor - Banwell Fence Co., Windsor, 

Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson i: Co.. Winnipeg. 
Oneida Community, Niagara Falls. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen Sound 
Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, OBt. 
Peck Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Walter. E. F. k Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire & Nail Works, London, Ont. 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 



Wrapping Papers. 



Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Alex . ,v Co., Montreal. 



63 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 21, 1904. 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishingto berepresentedin Canada. 



Oilan Clyde Cullen. G.E.L.L.M. 

Coun seller at Law U.S. Supreme Court. 
Registered Attorney U.S. Patent Office, 

U.S. and Foreign Patents, Caveats, Copy- 
rights and Trade Marks. Military and 
Naval Inventions a specialty. Address, 

Box 264, Station (i, Washington, D.C. 

CUN SHOP and MODEL SHOP 

Warren White Sulphur Springs, 

Totten P.O., Virginia. 



Do you use a 

Roller 
Awning ? 

If not, why not ? We make 
the best roller awning in 
Canada. We can operate 
a 60-foot awning on one 
roller from one end easily 
and safely. Write or call 
for particulars. The best 
is none too good for you. 



WM. BARTLETT & SON 

Tents, Awnings and Flags 
16 Adelaide St. West, TORONTO. 




IRONSIDE FOR IRON 

SS^Vh'^VoVi'iK iron, steel, metals, bars, plates, 

SHEETS. BOLTS and NUTS, TIN PLATES, Etc. 

Sole Licencees for PAGE'S PATENT WIRE STRETCHER, and we 

are willing to sell the right of manufacture in Canada on a Royalty basis. 

IRONSIDE'S PATENT WIRE CUTTERS, guaranteed to cut any wire 

We publish a "Canadian Metal Price List" monthly. Quotations in Dollars and Cents. 
(C.I.F.) We will send this, and our "Weekly Market Report" on receipt of address. 



IRONSIDE, SON & CO., 



16 Water Lane 

Gt. Tower St., 

E. C 



London, Eng. 




75 YEARS 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS 



Want Ads. 



In this paper cost 2 cents per word first 
insertion, 1 cent per word subsequent in- 
sertions. Contractions count as one word, 
but five figures (such as $1,000) may pass 
as one word. Cash remittance to cover 
cost must in all cases accompany orders, 
otherwise we cannot insert the advertise- 
ment. When replies come in our care 5 
cents additional must be included for for- 
warding same. Many large business deals 
have been brought about through adver- 
tisements of 20 or 30 words. Clerks can be 
secured, articles sold and exchanged, at 
small expenditure. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 
Montreal and Toronto. 



CHAS P. CLARK, President. 



CHAS. L. BECKWITH, Secretary. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New Tork City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeter o mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expt-nae considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
bee" steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the 
civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 

OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX. N 8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. LONDON, ONT. 

QUEBEC, QUE. ST. JOHN, N.B, 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

TH0S. C, IRVING, Gen. Man. Western Canada. Toronto. 



MONTREAL, QUK. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



®B8 






SEVERALOTHER STYLES ILLUSTRATED IN OUR NEW CATALOGUE 



MADE OF CRUCIBLE STEEL. OIL TEMPERED. ANTI-RUST. NICKEL PLATED. 
WILL NOT BEND. BREAK OR RUST. EACH ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. 



Co m pany. Erie. Pa 



t>4 



RON 



Bars in Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half=0vals, Half=Roundsand 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

QOOD QUALITY. PROnPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 



ISTEELI 



Qp'ir'pn 




LUFKIN 



MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc, 

ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 



New York City Branch— 280 Broadway. 



For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



"ttUALITY FIRST 
AND ALWAYS." 




New Century Huron 
Hot Blast 



—Steel body ; cast bottom and top ; front mica 
feed door ancFtop lift feed door ; hot blast draft through tube and 
around sides through front register ; draw centre shaking grate : 
large ash pit and ash pan ; check draft at smoke collar. 



No. 


Diameter 


145 


12-in. 


165 


14-in. 


185 


16-in. 


215 


19-in. 



Height. 

48 -in. 
50y 2 -in. 
51 -in. 
52V 2 -in. 



Code Word. 

Admire 
Affiliate 
Affinity 
Affirm 



Ship. Weight. 

105-lbs. 
113-lbs. 
160-lbs. 
190-lbs. 



List. 

$21.50 

25.00 

28.50 

34.00 



SEISD FOR NET PRICES. 

We belong to No Association or Trust, therefore control 
and regulate our own prices. 

The_-^ 

Western Foundry Co,, 
Wingham, Ont. 



Limited, 





Est. 1868 



t 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 



PHILADELPHIA 



Twelve ^ 



^ Medals 



t 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 
.><*• ^ w 



t 




■ '%^%^%^%^^V^W^'%^.'W5fc^k%^^%.'%^^%.^%.'%^%.- 1 



" Redstone " 
Sheet Packing. 

For use in highest pressures for 
Steam, hot or cold Water and 
Air. Packs equally well for all. 
No trouble with leaky joints 
when they are packed with 
" REDSTONE/ ' The most 
satisfactory packing on the 
market. Try a sample lot and 
be convinced of its merits. 

Manufactured solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA k RUBBER MFC CO. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Temporary Offices : 

15 East Wellington Street, Toronto. 

Brenches-MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



PORTLAND CEMENT 



For import orders we are now prepared 
to quote prices fbr^^^d^" 

Best English Cement, ''White's" 
Best German Cement 
Best Belgian Cement 
Natural Belgian Cement 

In Barrels or Sacks 



B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO. 

LIMITED 

53 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 



SADLER a 11/IWeRTII 



For the 



Hardware 
Dealer 

If you handle 

Leather Belting 

write us for our discounts and 
description of the different 
grades. 



Montreal, Toronto. 



Classified List ot Advertisements on page bj. 



STERLING VALUE 
LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL 



HARDWARE-METAL 

AND CANADIAN MACHINIST 

A. WeeKly Newspaper devoted to tKe Hard-ware, Metal, MacHinery, 
Heating and Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVI. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. MAY 28, 1904. 



NO. 22 




* CUTLERYs 



FOk SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARB HOUSES. 



IT'S "QUEEN'S HEAD" 



That's all you need to know 
about Galvanized Iron. 



JOHN LTSAOHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE ft CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, END Managers Canadian Braccl . 



ALL OVER THE WORLD. 




Most of Canada's, as well as the world's, biggest buildings are 



"SAFFORD" RADIATORS 

the radiators that are famous all over the world — the radiators 
that never leak, because they have no bolts, rods or packing. 

Dealers and Steamfitters who wish to handle the best 
radiators should correspond with us. 

THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO., Limited 

Head Office : TORONTO. Branches : Montreal, Quebec, St. John, H.B., Winnipeg, Vancouver. 



£ £ 



SPARKLE 



99 



SYPMON. 



ONE LARGE "SPARKLET" BULB (B SIZE) 
IS USED TO CHARGE THIS SYPHON. 



RETURN 
i 28 10 




^^-^Wo. 32 




RETU&N 

fill 

SET 

line. 




^TURNED 



28 131/ 



No. 25 



Unscrew at (A) and remove the Syphon head and tube (Fig. 2). 

Fill the bottle with cold water up to the strand H only. Mineral Salts, such as the Potash, Soda, Lithia, Carlsbad, etc., 
supplied in Tablets by the Manufacturers, are the only additions that should be made to the water in the Syphon. Wine, Milk, 
Syrup, or Flavoring Essences have a tendency to clog the Syphon Valve. 

The bottle must in no case be filled above the line at M, as otherwise the Syphon will be damaged and rendered useless. 

Replace the head (Fig. 2) (carrying the tube E) on the bottle (Fig. 1) and screw down tightly so as to make a tight joint 
between the head and the bottle neck. 

Having screwed down the head as explained, unscrew and remove the fly cap C. Insert a large "Sparklet " Bulb (B size) 
neck downwards (see Fig. 2S) in the rubber washer inside the bulb holder D. 

Screw the fly cap C on over the Bulb, turning it gradually and slowly so as to press the Bulb against the piercing pin at the 
bottom of the holder D. As soon as the pin pierces the Bulb the gas will escape down the Syphon tube E into the bottle. It is 
very desirable that the gas should be admitted as slowly as possible ; when, therefore, the bubbles escaping from the end of the 
glass tube show that the gas is first entering the liquid, the bottle should be well shaken before and whilst the remainder of the gas 
is admitted by further turning the cap. 

Shake briskly and very thoroughly during and for a few moments after the admission of the gas. 

The Aeration is more permanent if the liquid is allowed to stand for a few minutes before using. 

When all the liquid is used remove the fly cap C and extract the empty Bulb, as the rubber washer will rapidly perish if left 
long in contact with the neck of the Bulb. It is also advisable to loosen the Syphon head a little, as, by so doing, the washer K will 
be found to last much longer than if the head be always kept screwed down tight when the Syphon is not in use. On no account, 
however, must the Cap C be removed or the Syphon head be loosened while any liquid remains in the Syphon. 

Note. — The tube is only loosely attached to the head, being kept in position inside the stem W by means of a rubber washer 
round a small projection X on the top of the tube, and can be readily removed if desired. It is not, however, advisable to remove 
it except for the purpose of renewing either the glass tube or the flat washer K. When replacing the tube after removal, care must 
be taken to see that the flat washer K is in position round the metal collar P, close up under the flange R, and that the tube is 
pushed home into the head as far as it will go. For this purpose the washer round the projection X should be slightly moistened. 
If the fly cap C does not screw on readily, or if the Syphon head does not tighten readily on the bottle neck, apply a little 
vaseline or similar lubricant. 

Keep the bottle clean, and do not use it if starred or cracked. Unused "Sparklet" Bulbs must not be thrown into the fire. 
Examine the pin, the Bulb-neck washer and the tube washer K (the only parts which wear out with use) from time to time, 
and if either of them shows signs of wear, replace by new ones. 

During hot weather it is essential that the liquid to be aerated be kept cool. 



WRITE FOR TRADE PRICES. 

RICE LEWIS 




SON 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WIRE ROPE 




"ACME" Brand 

Extra tensile strength for heavy work 



Should only be used on special large 
wheels and drums. 



THE B. GREENING WIRE CO. 

LIMITED 

HAMILTON, ONT. MONTREAL, QUE. 



THE CANADIAN RUBBER CO. 

of Montreal. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



G 



Rubber Belting, 
Hose, Packing, 
Valves, Gaskets, 



ETC, ETC 



We make a specialty of 

HORSE SHOE PADS 

the best in the market. 



Write for Price* and Circular*. 



Head Office : : MONTREAL 

BRANCHES-TORONTO, WINNIPEG and VANCOUVER 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




"YANKEE" 
RATCHET SCREW DRIVER 
,_N9I5,_ 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them . Mailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30. "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points In Handle. 




Manufacturers also of 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 

Fluting Machines, 

Hand Flitters. 



No. 0. "Yankee" Reciprocating Drill for Iron, Steel, Brass, Wood, etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magazine 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

LIMITED 

Wholesale Hardware Merchants, 

OTTAWA, ONT. 

In introducing 

The 

Universal 
Bread 
Maker 

we do so with confidence, 
knowing it will do all that 
is said of it. 

To mix and knead 
bread in 3 minutes may 
seem extravagant, but it 
is a fact 

Here is a 

MIXER, KNEADER and RAISER 

ALL IN ONE. 

The old and disagreeable task of Bread-making is done away with. 
We shall be pleased to send booklets for your customers, and give prompt 
attention to your sample order. 





FOR SALE BY- 



The KENNEOY HARDWARE CO , Limited 

49 Colborne St., TORONTO. ONT. 



Black Sheets 



COMMON 



DEAD FLAT 



Prompt Shipment. Prices Right. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Co 



503 Temple Building 



TORONTO. 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Worth Knowing* 

" Disston sold his common saws for a profit of only seven cents on the dozen in order 
to underbid the English, who then controlled our market, Out of that manufacture 
the Disston boys have erected a whole town, and there is no man in Australia or the 
British Colonies that would not prefer the American saw to any other." — From A 
Cyclopedia of Things Worth Knowing. 



kA^WV\'W\AV».-» 



If this, to the public at large, is worth knowing, 
how much more valuable should it be to Hardware 
Dealers in general, and you, as a Canadian 
Hardware Dealer, in particular. 




RETURNED 



IWnf <0O I vVMo. 8— Pruning Saw. 14 inch. The wedge shape allows it to get into narrow places. 

^ (' ] ( RETURNED 



GA^A/tO 




Mi 28 190 if 




olz::.:^ „„.._,„„.„„ „„ * zzzzzzzm 

No. 7— Butcher Saw. Flat steel back, extra steel blade, 18 to 26 inches. 





|rjgjjp jfcnystousa m ' a a^ftt,^„a i i n M/.rt,M. 



W\UUlUUUlUiUV 



No. D8— Hand Saw. Skew back, finest steel blade, polished and etched. 




~7\ 



^////// 



;w;/n/)WiW ;;;]Jj 




ST. LAWRENCE— Cross-cut Saw. Special steel, perforated lance tooth and thin back. 



LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



QUOTE 
LOW 



SHIP 
QUICK 



IMPORTERS AND DISTRIBUTORS. 



Address all Correspondence to 



TORONTO, 
87 York St. 



OTTAWA, 

54 Queen St. 



VANCOUVER, 
141 Water St. 



MONTREA 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



. V ! - M »1» M " I " M " 1 " M " I " M " 1 " ^ 



Cordage 

Of every description. 

INet Mountings, 

Sand Line, 

Unoiled Cordage, 

Marline, 

Extra Long Lengths, 

Ratline, 

Shingle Yarn. 

Core Rope, 

Oil Well Cables, 

Russian Packing, 
J Deep Sea Lines, 
:|: Anchor Line, 
| Good Transmission Rope, 
t Engine Packing. 



Mail 

Orders 
Now 

To us and 

Receive 

Exceptional 

Attention. 

Low-priced goods are not always ^ 
the cheapest. 



:: Clothes Lines, 

:: Only Best Material Used. 

** Log Line 

:: "wine. 

•• Dangerous to use Inferior Cordage. 

** 
** 
** 

WWr iM MM M- M - M - H-I-I - M - M - M - H - H -I- - M -M-M- M -M-M-I-M ..MmH-H-M- H - M - I - M - !■ I ! ■ I M -- H. 4 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



RU 



BRAND CUTLERY 



POCKET CUTLERY 

GUARANTEED QUALITY. 



JZS& 




RAZORS 
SCISSORS 



BEST GOODS 



RIGHT PRICES 



E. F. WALTER & CO., 



166 and 168 
McGill St., 



Montreal 



►♦+♦♦♦♦ ♦+ ++++++++ f ++ +++++> ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 4+++-H 



WILCOX MFG. CO. OF ONTARIO, Limited 



x 



HEAD 
OFFICE 



LONDON, ONT. 



t 
t 



♦4 



Door Hangers of every description, Automatic Fire Door 
Equipments, Overhead Trolley Carrying Systems, Velox 
Bail-Bearing Grindstones, Velox Ball-Bearing Emery 
Grinders, Triumph Wire Stretchers, Sash Weights. 

WRITE FOR PRICES. 

♦+++++++ ♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦- 



FACTORIES 



AURORA, 111. 

ST. THOMAS, Ont. 

HAMILTON, Ont. 



DAVID MAXWELL & SONS 




ST. MARYS, ONT., CANADA. 

"Maxwell Favorite Churn" Lawn Mowers. 



PATENTED FEATURES: Improved Steel Stand, 
Roller Bearings, and Foot and Hand Lever 
Drive, and Detachable Driving Link. Improved 
for season of 1904. Steel or Wood Frame as 
desired. 



High and Low Wheels.from 
12 to 20 in. widths. Cold 
Rolled Steel Shafting, Cru- 



Wheelbarrows. 



In Four Different Sizes 



Steel Frame Churn 



cible Steel Knives and Cutting Plate. 

If your Wholesale House does not offer you these 
articles 

SEND DIRECT TO US. 



"THE MAXWELL" 

Lawn Mower 

High Wheel 10 inches 



MAXWELL MOWER 

8-inch Low Wheel. 




HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 




The only real value of money lies in 
making use of it. 

The money that lies there in your safe 
from day to day doesn't do you any good 
until you commence to use it. 

Then its value to you depends on how 
you use it. 

Now, if you would only invest some of it 
in advertising space in Hardware and 
Metal, and then use the space right, you'd 
have a valuable assistant, working to increase 
your trade with hardwaremen and to make 
yourself and your goods better known 
among them. 

Some folks would sooner save (?) the 
money— but they are "penny wise and 
pound foolish." 

But you're not. 
Are you ? 



Brass Chains 




For all 

\J ses 



Let us know your needs, and 
we will quote you. 

We supply brass chains in all sizes, Pic- 
ture, Chandelier, Brazed Oval Link, Ladder, 
etc., etc., and can make it to your advan- 
tage to buy from us. 

Cast and stamped brassware of every description, 

Jones & Barclay, Birmi.i K hf»m, eok. 



r 



A Class By Itself. 

We ilistinctly claim to offer in our Hamilton 22 " Take- 
down " Kifle No. 19, an article that alike for "looks" 
and "doings" oi necessity "flocks" quite alone. Weknow 
of nothing in metal with so much of absolute excellence 
for $2.50 as this beautiful and effective little 
rifle. Wherever it is shown it sells itself, and no 
merchant bent on keeping 'up with the times," 
can better spend any five minutes than the five re- 
quired to digest our highly enlightening little 
folder. 
Shall we mail it to you ? 






■n 



The HAMILTON RIFLE CO., 

BjX No. tk. PLYMOUTH, MICH. 




NUCLFAN PUBU5IUN& CO -DCPT. 0FA0VEHT15IN& 5£r\VlC£ 



»*5&£~ S wis 

— — M ;; 



BICYCLES and 

BICYCLE 

SUPPLIES 
AUTOMOBILE 
MATERIAL 

Send name and address for our Special Midsummer 
Job List — bargains in Bicycle Sundries, Tires, 
Automobile Lamps and Sporting Goods. Don't 
miss this— it will stimulate your trade. 

JOHN MILLEN & SONS 

MONTREAL and TORONTO. 




May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canadian Cordage 

& MFG. Co., Limited. 

BINDER TWINE. 






"ROYAL" MANILA, 650 ft. to the pound. 
" ROYAL " MANILA, 600 ft. to the pound. 
" ROYAL " MANILA, 550 ft. to the pound. 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 500 ft. to the pound. 
STANDARD, - 500 ft. to the pound. 
SISAL, - - 500 ft. to the pound. 

Our " ROYAL " Brand of Binder Twine is manufactured of the finest raw material 
that can be obtained, and with the utmost care. For length and strength we have no com- 
petitors. Our twine is manufactured with the latest machinery, and dealers desiring to have 
exclusive agencies should apply at once. 

Write, Wire or 'Phone. 



CANADIAN CORDAGE £» MPG. CO., Limited 

Peterborough, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY 

(Established 1848* Limited 

Largest manufacturers in the world of 

WELDLES8 CHAIN. 

As a halter chain they are 
without an equal, as they pos- 
sess the exclusive feature of a 
patented Lock Ring, which 
enables the animal to be in- 
stantly tied ' 'short" or ' 'long-. " 

The standard for Cow 
Ties, Dog Leads and 
Fancy Chains. 

In use by the leading rail- 
roads. 

Short lengths furnished 
without extra charge for manufac- 
turers of agricultural implements, 
makers of windmills, etc. A list of 
these users would include the best 
known firms of the country. 

Also well adapted to use for pad- 
locks and nearly every other purpose 
for which chains are wanted. 

Exported in large and increasing 
quantities. 

Address for catalogue, 

ONEIDA COMMUNITY LIMITED^ 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONTARIO. 



ONEIDA 
COMMUNITY 
LOCK RING. 



STEEL WIRE NAILS 

FOR ALL PURPOSES. 
A large quantity of 

STANDARD SIZES in Stock 

WOOD SCREWS, 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS, 

WIRE STAPLES. 



WIRE 



OF ALL KINDS 

AND 
FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



COPPER WIRE 

for 
TROLLEY - TELEGRAPH - TELEPHONE 
and 
TRANSMISSION LINES 

Manufactured by 

DOMINION WIRE MFG. CO. 



MONTREAL and TORONTO 



LIMITED 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



W 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 

every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 

purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 

Shafting. 

NOT IN THE COMBINE 

Ask for Prices of 

Shovels, Spades, Sooops, Etc. 

WE HAVE A LARGE STOCK. 

CANADA HARDWARE CO., Limited, Montreal 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



SHOT. 

In ordering, please specify The Abbey Im- 
proved Chilled Shot Co., Ltd., New- 
cast le-on-Tyne. 

N.B.— We also make Hard and Soft Shot but 
strongly recommend Improved Chilled Shot for 
penetration. 

N.B.— The only Company in Great Britain de 
voting its whole time to Shot making. 



ONTARIO SILVER GO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

u t . , FLATWARE. CUTLERY and 

manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



Dnlu Am Works 

Dundas, Canada. 

Write for Prices 
P. BERTRAM, - Managei. 




Steel Stamps 



For Manufacturers of 
MACHINERY and METALWARE 

All our work is guaranteed to be satisfactory. 



THE PARSONS-IRONS CO. 

58 Adelaide St. W., - TORONTO. 



Your Customers 

the farmers are looking for a fence, strong, 
serviceable and durable at a reasonable 
cost. You can supply it to them in the 

IDEAL 




It is strictly up-to-date and the best value 
to be had in wire fencing to-day. 

A GOOD SELLER 

We have a style for every purpose in either 
heavy or light fencing. Write for cata- 
logue showing fencing and gates. 

Coiled Spring Wire 

unexcelled in quality, shipped promptly 
THE 

McGregor=Banwell Fence Co. 



Limited 
Walkerville, Ont. 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO , Winnipeg 

Sole Agents for Manitoba andN. W. T. 




Manilla Paper Fibre Paper 



SnOlTH, TOUGH, BRIGHT. CLEAN 
ALL SIZES AND WBIQHTS 



Samples And 
prices gladly- 
sent. 



THE TOUGHEST OF THE TOUGH 
ALMOST WATERPROOF 

Canada Paper Co. 



TORONTO 



MONTREAL, 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK K£J » TE "'"« W00DEW "°« ET °" «"» * 

FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED andANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO , Limited. 



LONDON, ONT 




" Little Shaver 

Canadian Agents : 

E. H GRENFELL & CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



Cutest Thing in the Kitchen 

Shaves chocolate so thin that it dissolves without stirring. 
Slices Potatoes, Radishes, Cucumbers, Onions, Apples and 
all the smaller fruits and vegetables 
Made of black walnut. 
Knife is fine tempered steel. 

MADE ONLY BY 

J. M. MAST MFG. CO.. Lititz, Pa. 



SPECIAL 

DROP FORGED 

SPRINGS 

THE WALLACE BARNES CO., 

BRISTOL, CONN. 



DILLON FENCING 



THE HINGE IS COMPLETE, AND 
WORKS WITH THE UTMOST 
FREEDOM. 










ade only. 



CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO., Agents 

at Montreal and Winnipeg. 



Manufactured and sold by 

OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., Limited 

Owen Sound, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 




The "KING EDWARD." 



A cheap Lawn Mower 
may prove to be a 
very dear one 

— for the customer, and 
for the man who sold it. 

There is safety in 
Taylor-Forbes Mowers. 



IF Shipped promptly. 11 All Mowers liberally guaranteed. IF Repairs can be quickly obtained. 

1F Catalogue B will help you make up your order. 
IF Get through your jobber. 

THE TA YLOR-FORBES CO., Limited 



Montreal Branch : 

9 De Bresoles St 



GUELPH, CANADA. 

The largest manufacturers of Hardware in Canada. 



SEASONABLE GOODS 




Water Cooler*. 

Handsomely Japanned and 
decorated. 

Nickel Plated Faucets, 
5 Sizes. 



Water Pot*. 

Plain and Japanned, 

6 Sizes. 

Galvanized, 3 Sizes. 

All supplied with our patent Rose. 





Novelty Refrigerator* and 
Water Cooler* 

3 Sizes Made of Galvanized Iron. 

Decorated in Oak. Separate compartment for Ice, 
with Nickel-plated Faucet attached. 



WE WILL BE PLEASED TO QUOTE YOU. 



KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CAN. 



10 



May 28, 1904 



Hardware and Metal 



The Evolution of Electric Lighting 



s. n. 



i 



CHINESE legends dating back 
to remote antiquity tell of the 
early knowledge possessed by 
them of the north and south 
directive tendencies of the 
lode-stone. The ancients were also con- 
versant with the fact that by robbing 
amber with a dry cloth it could be made 
to attract feathers and small bodies. 
No progress was made, however, until 
the genius of the immortal Gilbert 
shone forth, about the close of the six- 
teenth century, and to him belongs the 
credit of being the founder of electrical 
science, to which he applied the term 
' ' Electrics . ' ' The next to advance in 
this direction was Otto Von Guereke, 
who produced the first machine ever 
built for generating electricity. This 
was two hundred and fifty years ago. 
His machine consisted of a sulphur 
globe, having an iron axis on which it 
was turned, while friction was applied 
by the hand. He noticed the machine 
gave forth crackling sparks and brushes 
of fire, which were plainly visible in a 
dark room. This is the earliest re- 
corded observation of an electric light. 
For the next hundred and fifty years 
nothing of paramount importance was 
deduced, although investigators had been 
at work from time to time, and several 
striking discoveries were made. It was 
during this period that electricity was 
first conducted, which was done by Gray 
in T730. He used a damp string for a 
conductor and wax for insulators. The 
idea of using wire was not thought of 
untl later on. Some time after Von 
Kliest tried to bottle up electricity, 
which resulted in the discovery of the 
Leyden jar, the discharges of which 
were likened to thunder and lightning. 
It remained for Franklin, in 1852, by 
his t anions kite experiment to demon- 
strate the absolute identity between 
these two phenomena; 

It was not until the last year of the 
eighteenth century that a new era in 
electrical development was instituted 
by Volta in his discovery, of the electric 
battery, and this comparatively power- 
ful source of electricity opened a wide 
path into fresh fields of discovery. In 
1810 Humphrey Davy, with a battery of 



2,0(10 paii's of copper and zinc, amazed 
the world with his firsl electric arc, 
which was produced between two char- 
coal points. The charcoal was suit, 
however, and with no controlling device 
the light was naturally of an uncertain 
nature. This remained only as a bril- 
liant laboratory experiment until 1S44, 
when Faucault, using Bunsen batteries 
and electrodes of hard gas carbon, suc- 
ceeded in getting a steady light, the 
value of which was at once recognized. 
Thirteen years previous to this Michael 
Faraday gave to the world the result of 
his classic discovery of electric induc- 
tion, without which the present high 




TURNED 
. ) 190^ 

/? 



A Modern Street Lamp, The R.E.T. Pringle & Co. 

state of development in electric light- 
ing would be entirely impossible. This 
discovery soon began to bear fruit, and 
different inventors set to work to pro- 
duce electro magnetic machines which 
were more or less successful. 

The first English patent on an arc 
lamp was issued to Stark in 1856, but 
it was not found practicable. A short 
time after Serrins patented a lamp that 
was more successful, and to which other 
inventors added further improvements. 
Some comparatively large electro mag- 
netic machines were built, and in con- 
junction with a Serrins arc lamp the 
lighthouse of Dunoeness was illumin- 
II 



ated, marking the first permanent and 
practicable application of the electric 
arc. In 1S70 Gramme invented the 
method of winding armatures which 
hears his name, and several large gener- 
ators were built for commercial pur- 
poses. The clock tower on the House 
of Parliament, in London, was illumin- 
ated for several months by arc lights 
supplied bv these machines. Some time 
after they were also employed for light- 
ing in the British and other navies, but 
the large first cost of these plants, to- 
gether with large operating expenses, 
prevented their being used to any great 
commercial extent. In the United States 
other svstems were being worked out. 
and one of them, invented by Brush, was 
so perfect and substantial in its details 
that it at once came to the front, and 
has maintained a leading position to the 
present day. 

Up to 1879 the incandescent lamp had 
received little thought outside of the 
laboratory. In this year, Swan in Eng- 
land made and exhibited an incandescent 
lamp having a carbon filament. How- 
ever, the credit for perfecting and put- 
ting upon a commercial basis the do- 
mestic use of the incandescent lamp be- 
longs to Edison, whose brilliant and 
masterly work in that line is well 
known. That same year he went to 
work with his characteristic ardor and 
perseverance to make the incandescent 
lam]) an industrial success, the result 
of which is felt to-day in every town and 
city in the land. At Menlo Park his 
laboratory was fitted up and ample 
funds were supplied him to carry on his 
investigations. Almost every conceiv- 
able material was tried to get a suit- 
able filament, and men were sent to 
many foreiffn countries to collect and 
forward all kinds of vegetable fibres 
that might possess the necessary charac- 
teristic. In describing the circum- 
stances. W. S. Andrews, one of Edi- 
son's assistants, says: 

"After many months ot careflul in- 
vestigation, during which filaments 
were made from a greal variety of ma- 
terials, such as woo : . cotton, papei', 
graphite, lamp black and various vege- 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



table fibres, it was found that the 
carbonized outer shell of the bamboo 
cane gave the best results, so this ma- 
terial was finally adopted and used for 
many years thereafter. 

"The discovery of a suitable sub- 
stance for the incandescent lamp fila- 
ment was obviously only a small part 
of the work to be accompished, for 
Edison had set himself the task of de- 
signing a comprehensive electric 
lighting system to be complete in its 
minutest details from the generators 
to the lamps. It was something abso- 
lutely new and untried, inasmuch as it 
was a low voltage multiple arc system 
in which each lamp was to be an inde- 
pendent unit which could be lighted or 
extinguished wthout affecting any other 
lamp on the circuit, whereas previous 
eelctric lighting with arc lamps had 
been operated on the series system, in- 
volving a certain voltage for each lamp 
and therefore a total voltage higher in 
direct proportion to the number of lamps 
included in a circuit. 

"Many eminent scientists pronounced 
Edison's plans chimerical and impos- 
sible to be put into practice, but no dis- 
couragement could dampen his ardor or 
weaken his faith in final success, so 
the work of development steadily pro- 
gressed. One hundred and ten volt 
shunt wound generators were designed 
and built. Crude switches, lamp sock- 
ets and safety appliances were devised 
and made up. Copper wire was la- 
boriously covered with hemp cord, 
painted over with coal tar and laid in 
the ground in wooden troughs. Wood- 
en lamp posts were erected and fitted 
with large round globes of clear glass 
to protect the lamps and sockets with- 
in, and at last in the early winter of 
1880-1881, the work of installation 
was completed and the snow covered 
woodlands for a quarter of a mile 
around the Menlo Park laboratory were 
illuminated night after night by glit- 
tering rows of 110 volt incandescent 
lamps, which presented much the same 
appearance as those which we see any 
night. The surrounding residences had 
also been wired and were brilliantly 
lighted' every night with the new incan- 
descent lamp. 

"People came from far and near to 
see this wonderful exhibition which 
marked the beginning of the industrial 
era of domestic electric lighting and 



the daily papers were full of the pos- 
sibilities and impossibilities of the new 
illuminant. " 

Lighting plants were soon established 
in New York and London, where some 
of Edison's "Jumbo" generators sup- 
plied light at 110 volts, but the cost of 
copper was enormous and the size of 
the machines out of all proportions to 
their output. The sphere of this low 
voltage direct current was naturally 
limited, and it was not until alternat- 
ing current machines were built and in- 
stalled that rapid strides in the art of 
incandescent li.°htinp were made. 

A history of recent development would 
be a history of the large electrical com- 
panies, where new apparatus is design- 



United States alone at the present time, 
and twenty-five years ago there was not 
a single plant in existence. 



AUTOMOBILE RACING STOPPED. 

Action was taken by the City Coun- 
cil of Montreal this week in connection 
with the regulation of speed of auto- 
mobiles. Thei'e was already an existing 
by-law prohibiting any vehicle being run 
on the streets at a greater rate than six 
miles an hour. It was claimed that 
nothing was done to prevent fast riding, 
and one alderman said it was not un- 
common to see automobiles running 
along the streets at twenty miles an 



"• 




A Modern Incandescent Lamp for Street Lighting. 



ed and improved upon from time to time. 
To describe the systems, machines and 
apparatus in use to-day for arc and in- 
candescent lighting would fill a volume. 
So rapid has progress been in recent 
years that standard apparatus is only 
now beginning to be a certainty. Quite 
recently Nernst lamps and mercury arcs 
have been introduced into the electric 
lighting Held, but what part they are des- 
tined to play is as yet not a possible 
prophesy. Some idea of the extent of 
the development of electric lighting may 
be had when it is known that there are 
five hundred million dollars invested in 
central station lighting plants in the 



hour. A motion was put and carried 
that the bv-law be fully enforced. 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE^*. 

Prompt Shlpmeatl 



The ONTARIO TACK CO 

Limited 



12 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETO. 

For the convenience of its readers Hardware and 
Metal has opened its columns for the review of catalogues, 
booklets or other such publications issued by manufacturers 
or wholesale dealers selling to the hardware, plumbing, 
machinery or metal trades. Retailers desiring such publica- 
tions may also have inserted a note to that effect. It is re- 
quested that when any of the trade write for any booklet 
mentioned in these columns that they credit Hardware 
and Metal as the source of their information. 

Automobile Supplies. 

JOHN MILLEN & SONS, Montreal 
and Toronto, are issuing to the 
trade an illustrated catalogue of 
automobile supplies. This is a line of 
goods which this firm have made one of 
their distinctive specialties, and no 
dealer who handles these supplies should 
fail to send for a copy. In presenting 
their 1904 line of solar, motor, cycle 
and launch lamps, John Millen & Sons 
wish particularly to impress upon dis- 
cerning purchasers that solar lamps are 
not experiments, but are, instead, a 
finished and scientifically constructed 
product of one of the oldest and largest 
makers of acetylene lamps in the world. 
Each and every lamp, both gas and oil, 
turned out of their factory, is fully 
guaranteed. 

The catalogue is well illustrated and 
shows an extensive line of Tonneau tail 
lamps, oil side lamps, solar dash gas 
lamps, carriage lamps, etc. The 1901 
model launch headlight is moderate in 
price and is selling well. Automobile 
horns and dry batteries, etc., are also 
illustrated and described. Write for a 
copy. 



Arc Lighting. 

Hardware and Metal has received 
from the R. E. T. Pringle Co., Limited, 
Montreal and Toronto, a few of the 
latest bulletins of the Adams-Bagnall 
Electric Co., Cleveland, Ohio, whose 
Canadian agents the R. E. T. Pringle 
Co., Limited, are. The latest is the 
1904 bulletin, No. 18, which contains 
valuable information regarding alternat- 
ing current, series arc lighting. Bulletin 
No. 26 contains directions for installing 
the Adams-Bagnall alternating constant 
current regulators. In bulletin No. 25 
is contained information for operating 
"A-B" constant current alternating en- 
closed arc lamps. To those interested 
in this subject a complete set of these 
bulletins would be of great value, and 
readers of Hardware and Metal may get 
them by applying directly to the Adams- 
Bagnall Electric Co., Cleveland, Ohi 
through the R. E. T. Pringle Co., Lim 
ited, Montreal. 



Crocker- Wheeler Co. 

The Crocker-Wheeler Co., manufac- 
turers and electrical engineers, Am- 
pere, N. J., are sending out a bulletin 




\M%m& 







Paint Profits. 

If you are selling paints to make 
money, you want to make the most 
money and to do the largest business. 

It takes the best paint and the most 
push to do the biggest business. The 
better the paint and the greater the push, 
the bigger the business. You want qual- 
ity — but you want more — you must have 
push — progress — advertising. 

If you want the best of these — the 
finest quality and the most effective 
advertising — the most helps — the biggest 
and most profitable paint business, write 
now for our 1904 Agency Proposition. 

WThe Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 

CANADIAN DIVISION, 

Headquarters— 21 St. Antoine St., Montreal. 

Depots -id York St., Toronto; 147 Bannatyne St., East, Winnipeg. 



% 



#'" 



containing the report of a series of 
articles which appeared in Electrical 
World and Engineer, on the electrical 
equipment of the largest printing office 
in the world, the Government printing 
office. 

Cleveland Twist Drill Co. 
Hardware & Metal has received from 
the Cleveland Twist Drill Co., Cleve- 
land, O., a copy of their booklet en- 
titled, "Twist Drills; their Uses and 
Abuses." In this booklet the company 
present a brief and comprehensive col- 
lection of ideas based on their own 
practice and observation regarding the 
use of twist drills in order to get the 
best cutting capacity, combined with 
the maximum durability. The ideas are 
acknowledged by the company not to be 
all new, and contain much that may 
already be familiar to machinists. How- 
ever, to a number of those whose ex- 
perience with twist drills is not very 



extensive, it will prove of considerable 
value. Readers of Hardware and Metal 
may secure a copy of the booklet upon 
application to the Cleveland Twist Drill 
Co., Cleveland, Ohio. 

An Error Corrected. 

In the notice last week of the Pitts- 
burg Steel Co.'s catalogue, a typo- 
graphical error occurred. The address 
of J. W. Taylor, the Canadian repre- 
sentative of this company, is 338 St. 
James street, Montreal, (not 388, as 
stated in last issue). Hardware and 
Metal readers writing for these cata- 
logues should note this correction. 

Calipers and Dividers. 

Hardware and Metal has received a 
booklet illustrating and describing a 
new line of calipers and dividers that 
have been placed upon the market by the 
makers. These tools show a departure 
from the well known lines of this class, 



13 



Hardware and Metal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



in that the legs are round and not Hat, 
which feature adds materially to the 
stiffness and gives a neatness and finish 
that could not otherwise be obtained. 
Readers of Hardware and Metal may 
secure a copy of this booklet, upon ap- 
plication to Brown & Sharpc Mfg. Co., 
Providence, H. I. 



Steam Heating. 

The Union Steam Pump Co., Battle 
Creek. Mich., have issued a very inter- 
esting tedder, entitled "Hints on Mod- 
ern Steam Heating," which contains 
some very useful information regarding 
the vacuum system of steam heating. 



Pumping Machinery. 

Fairbanks, Morse & Co., Chicago, are 
sending out their 1904 catalogue, No. 
48, describing and illustrating steam 
and power pumping machinery. Since the 
issuing of their last catalogue this firm 
have increased their facilities for manu- 
facturing steam pumps, and having dur- 
ing the past year equipped a new fac- 
tory. They claim that this catalogue 
illustrates marked advances in the de- 
sign of pumps, and so anyone interested 
in pumping machinery should secure one 
of these catalogues. 




ONTARIO. 

I. Moquin & Co., Crysler, general mer- 
chant, has assigned. 

B. Brooks, of the firm of B. Brooks & 
Sons, contractors, Windsor, is dead. 

J. Murphy & Bro., general merchants, 
Coldwater, have sold out to Garrett & 
Horrell. 

The assets of E. A. Gauthicr & Co., 
general merchants, Plantagenet Springs, 
have been sold. 

S. A. Gray cV: Co., Meaford, general 
merchants, have suffered loss by fire; 
loss covered by insurance. 

I. Moquin & Co., Crysler, general 
merchants, announced a meeting of 
creditors for the 26th inst. 

Chadwick Bros., metal and brass 
manufacturers, Hamilton, have sustain- 
ed loss by tire; insurance covers the 
loss. 

QUEBEC. 

The Canadian Electric Co., Montreal, 
have registered. 

Laurin & Leiteh, contractors, Mon- 
treal, have registered. 



IVER 

JOHNSON 3 
REVOLVERS 




Wherever you see the sign, it stands for 
revolver supremacy and suggests IVER 
JOHNSON PRODUCTS. Iver Johnson 
Revolvers have the largest sale of any in 
the world. 



Best Advertised— Best Known. 



Send for Catalogue. 



IVER JOHNSONS ARMS & CYCLE WORKS, 



New York Office, 99 Chambers Street. 



FITCHBURO. MASS. 



A. Messier, general merchant, Isle Aux 
Noix, has registered. 

A. Frenette & Cie., brickmakers, 
Beauport, have registered. 

Brunet & Brunet, brick contractors, 
Montreal, have registered. 

Champagne Freres, plumbers, etc., 
Montreal, have registered. 

P. Morin, general merchant, St. Thur- 
ibe, has offered to compromise.. 

(i rat ton & Rheaumc, contractors, 
Montreal, have dissolved partnership. 

The assets of J. W. Pouliot, varnish 
manufacturer, Quebec, have been sold. 

G. O. Tousignant, general merchant, 
Chicoutimi, is offering 35c on the dollar. 

The assets of F. Galipeau, general 
merchant, Weedon Station, have been 
sold. 

The assets of J. L. Sequin, general 
merchant, St. Simon, arc to be sold by 
lender. 

J. Perron, general merchant, St. 
Paul's Bay, had a meeting to appoint 
curator on 25th inst. 

J. Perron, general merchant, St. 
Paul's Bay, has assigned; V. E. Paradis 
provisional guardian. 

Wood & Son, general merchants, 
I'ense, have sold out to Stewart & 
Birt. 

E. Nicol & Son, general merchants, 



Boissevain, have sold out to Marston & 
Singleton. 

S. Mendlevich, general merchant, Gren- 
fel, has had his stock damaged by fire; 
no insurance. 

Wood, Home & Co., general merch- 
ants, Weyburn, have been succeeded by 
W__ Home & Co. 

The factory . of the Ledoux Carriage 
Co., Montreal, has been burnt; the loss 
is covered by insurance. 

NOVA SCOTIA. 

Mcintosh & Chisholm, general merch- 
ants, Port Hawkesbury, have dissolved 
partnership. 

Declaration of partnership for A. J. 
Brymer, North Sydney, only to do busi- 
ness under the firm name of the Mac- 
Neil Cycle Co., has been registered. 

MANITOBA AND N.W.T. 

Lawson & Dames, builders, Russel, 
have been succeeded by E. J. Lawson. 

II. Baker, carriage maker, Saskatoon, 
has admitted G. V. Tupper as partner. 

Sedore Bros., harness makers, Kil- 
larney, have opened a branch at Ros- 
thern. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Spillman & Todd, painters, Vancouver, 
have dissolved partnership. 



14 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY. 



TEMPORARY WAREHOUSE: 
212-218 Cowan Avenue. 



LIMITED 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE. 



Xr.W CITY OFFICE-21 Scott Street ; Telephone, Main 4056. wa^X ^, ..... 



Telephone, 
Office 



Weed Cutter or Thistle Spud 



ED 

MAY 28 19(W 



RETUR 

Mar 28 




ED RETUlNED RETU | 
MAY 21190 </■ 



O^AyO 



NED RETlJ|- 

19(W MAY M'' r < 




D. H. Bd. Point Shovel D. H. Spade 



Gi! more 
Old's 
Gray's . 
Burns' 
Jones' 



Old's 
Gray's 
Burns' 
Jones' 



D. H. Sq. P. Shovel 
Gilmore 
Old's 
Gray's 
Bums' 
Jones' 



RNED 



RETUR 
MAY 26 




L. H. Rd. P. Shovel 

Gilmore 

Old's 

Gray's 

Burns' 

Jones' 





L.H. Sq. P. Shovel 
Gilmore 
Old s 
Gray's 
Burns' 
Jones' 



Ditohing Spades. 




MAY 28 190 



Draining Spade 



Post-Hole Spade. 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., u*..™. Toronto. 



We Ship Promptly, 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. 

Factory: Dufferln Street, Toronto, Ont. 
15 



Our prices are right. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



New and Second-Hand Machinery, 

Engines, Boilers, Belting, Pulleys, 

Motors, Etc. 

Any readers of this paper wanting 
any of the abo*.e goods may have 
an advertisement inserted free in 
Hardware and Metal, the 
machinery weekly newspaper of 
Canada, by enclosing this notice. 
Address 

HARDWARE and METAL 

Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg. 



The 



Hamilton Steel & Iron Company 



LIMITED 



HAMILTON, - CANAOA. 

OPEN HEARTH 

STEEL CASTINGS 

OF ANY WEIGHT. 



ELECTRICIANS' INSULATED PLYERS 




Hard Rubber Handles 



RETURNED 

iUN .2 fo<j<f 



F. W. LAMPLOUGH & CO., - MONTREAL. 




Fairbanks 



"™"5 Renewable 

ASBESTOS DISC 

^Globe Valves 



Last longer and give better satisfaction 
than ANY OTHER Globe Valve on the 
market. 

Send for Catalogue. 



The Fairbanks Company 



Montreal 



Toronto 



Winnipeg 



Vancouver 



16 



May 28. 1904 



Hardware and Metal 




THE MACHINERY MARKETS. 



Quebec Markets. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, May 27, 1904. 

CONSIDERABLE business has 
been done during the past 
week in the machinery line, 
although some dealers report 
that it is hardly up to what il 
was a week ago. The impetus given 
to trade a few weeks since by the ad- 
veni of Spring and the opening up of 
navigation is still felt, although not to 
such a marked degree. However, a good 
ileal of work is being- undertaken that 
was prevented until quite recently, and 
the machinery market is a direct factor 
in the benefit derived therefrom. There 
are a large number of industrial con- 
tracts being fulfilled throughout the 
country, necessitating heavy machinery. 
The prospects are so bright in this line 
that contractors are equipping them- 
selves with new and up-to-date appar- 
atus more than ever before. More new 
machinery and less second-hand is re- 
quired than formerly. 

Wood-Working machinery seems to be 
in greatest demand, and more orders arc 
reported this week, a particularly large 
one from St. John's, Nrld. A brick 
yard equipment is also on the list of this 
week's orders. The trade in contrac- 
tors' and railway supplies has opened 
up so well and favorably that 1904 bids 
lair to equal, if not to surpass, 1903. 
The trade in electrical machinery is 
brisk, and a large number of motors 
have been installed. 



Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front street east. 

Toronto, May 28, 19)4 

THERE is not much change in the 
market condition this week. The 
general improvement noted in last 
week's issue continues, but there is no 
exceptional feature to be noted. The 
condition is bright, not a few orders 
having been closed by local dealers, one 
or two of which are very large ones 



However, the majority have been small, 
ordinary deals. 

Perhaps in the wood-working machin- 
ery line not so much has been done this 
week as last, but last week's business 
in that line was exceptionally large, 
especially with some (inns. 

The machine tool trade has been good 
(his week, the two largest orders that 
were placed with local firms being for 
that class of machinery. Both of these 
were placed with the Fairbanks Co., one 
being from the Petrie Mfg. Co., Brant- 
ford, and the other from the Canadian 
Westinghouse Co., Hamilton. The 

tools were from the Niles-Bement-Pond 
Co., New York. 

The market for engines and boilers 
continues steady, there being the usual 
amount of business done in these lines 
during the past week. 

For electrical machinery there has 
been the usual good demand, there be- 
ing, however, no very large orders 
placed with local dealers or manufac- 
turers. 



A Powerful Automobile Train. 

A RECENT issue of Railway Age 
contains a description of this 
train, which is constructed for 
hauling borax out of Death Valley, Cali- 
fornia, consisting of the tractor contain- 
ing the power plant and seven cars. 
The power is electrically transmitted to 
one pair of wheels under each ear. The 
power -'ant consists of a three-cylinder 
four cycle engine of 75 h.p., directly con- 
nected to G. E. generator. The cur- 
rent is delivered to motors on the driv- 
ing wheels of the tractor end of each 
car, the advantage being that the pay- 
ing load of the train is utilized for ad- 
hesive weight, and therefore it is not 
necessary that the tractor have adhesion 
enoueh to pull the whole train. Each 
car has a capacitv of .'{0,000 lbs., and 
weight, empty, 9,600 lbs. They are al- 
most entirely of Steel, the frames being 
structural shapes. The cars dump by 
mean* of swing side doors. The wheels 



are of flange boiler type, and connect ion 
is made with the motor by means of 
chains. The train is equipped with 
Westinghouse air brakes, supplied by a 
motor-driven compressor in the tractor. 
The tractor is steered in a similar man- 
ner to the ordinary automobile, and the 
trailer cars are constructed with a fifth 
wheel and tongue, the tongue ofl each 
car coupling to the rear of the car 
ahead, so that when the direction of the. 
tractor is altered each trail ear follows 
in practically the same arc of a circle. 

Hints on Erection of Planers. 

SOME valuable hints on the erection 
of planers are given by a large 
manufacturer of machine tools, as 
follows : 

It is not imperative that small plan- 
ers should have heavy foundations, al- 
though it is preferable that they should. 
However, it is necessary that large 
planers, namely, from the 36 inch up, 
should have a good, solid foundation. 
The foundations that give the best scr- 
\ ice are of concrete. 

The question of foundation being set- 
tled, the planer should be carefully 
levelled in every direction, the table 
having been removed. The countershaft 
should be placed one foot in the rear of 
planer for every ten feet in height, for 
the reason that the belts shift better 
when the countershaft is in that posi- 
tion. Belting should always be extra 
double belting of Hie full width of pul- 
leys on the machine. The inside large 
pulley, the driver, is always driven with 
a cross belt. 

Upon starting the machine for the 
first time every oil hole should lie well 
oiled, in particular the large journals 
and bearings. Then afterwards the ma- 
chine should be oiled regularly once a 
day, and the machine kept in a clean 
condition. 

It it be found necessary, the friction 
may be adjusted, by unloosening the two 
jam nuts on the rim of the friction and 
screwing down or up the set screws 
very slightly. Then lighten up the jam 
nuts again to hold the set screw 



i; 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



May 28, 1904 



THE CINCINNATI UPRIGHT DRILL. 




24-inch Upright Drill, Cincinnati Machine Tool Co. 

A MON(! the best drilling machines 
/ 1 made in t he United States the pro- 
duets of the Cincinnati Machine 
Tool Co., Cincinnati, 0., sold in Can- 
ada by II. W. Petrie, must always be 
included. The illustrations given here- 
with show one of the newest drills made 
by this house, also the improved patent 
geared tapping attachment, as applied 
to the heavy pattern, sliding head, up- 
right drills. 

This improved patent geared tapping 
attachment makes the drills the most 
efficient on the market for drilling and 
tapping, work such as is generally done 
on high priced machines, and these drills 
fitted with this attachment are but little 
higher in price than a machine with fric- 
tion clutch pulleys when the additonal 
belting and line shaft pulleys are taken 
into consideration. 

The operator of one of these drills is 
enabled to do drilling and tapping very 



much quicker than he has formerly been 
aide to do on drilling machines arranged 
with friction clutch pulleys or tight and 
loose pulleys, as by having full control 
he is able to stop, start or reverse the 
spindle instantly, thereby being in posi- 
tion to do more drilling, as the time con- 
sumed in making the changes of drills, 
chucks and sockets is greatly reduced. 

With this attachment he can tap right 
or left hand threads equally well, and 
a forward movement of the lever, shown 
at the left, starts the spindle, and when 
the tap has gone the required depth a 
movement of the lever in the opposite 
direction reverses the spindle and re- 
turns the tap twice as fast as it went 
forward in doing the work, the ratio of 
the attachment being two to one. 

When no tapping is to be done for 
several hours or days the attachment can 
be disengaged by the movement of a 
lever for this purpose, thus saving the 
parts from wear and leaving the machine 
a standard drilling machine, with the 
great advantage of being able to stop 
the spindle instantly for making 
changes of chucks, sockets and drills 
without necessitating the stopping of the 
machine at belt shifter, which would 
consume much greater time. 

On the Cincinnati upright drills, 
which are unusually heavy and rigid, 
with strong gearing and large driving 
pulleys, very heavy tapping can be done 




Patent Geared Tapping Attachment of Cincinnati Drill. 



May 28, 1904 

Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 



The Best Door Closer Is . . . 
NEWMAN'S INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRING | 

Will close a door silently against any pressure of wind. 
Has many working advantages over the ordinary 
spring and has twice the wear. In use through- 
out Great Britain and the Colonies Gives perfect 

satisfaction. Made only by 

W. NEWMAN & SONS, 

Hospital St., - - BIRMINGHAM 




BUY 

KERR 

VALVES. 



They give 
satisfaction 
every time, 

Catalogue 
on application. 



The Kerr Engine Co. 



Walkervllle, Ont. 



SPECIFY 




Penberthy Injector Co., 



LIMITED. 



BRASS MFRS 



Windsor, Ont 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers. 




MACHINERY 



"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

is YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

8end for Folder No.M. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO 

Rochester, N.Y., D.8.A. 



WORK AND 

PRICES 

RIGHT 



WIND 
ENGINE & PUMP CO, 

TORONTO, ONT. LIMITED. 



BABBIT 




N9o 

N2 1 

STAR 

SPECIAL l> 

HERCULES 

METALLIC 

IMPERIAL 



?p%^jZffi* (anada Metal (6. 



William St.JORONTO. telephone main 1729. 



BEAVER POST HOLE DIGGER 

will please your customers. 
No wood to rot or check. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO THE TRADE. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY, 

LIMITED 
Head Office and Works, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices — Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver, 
Victoria, Rossland. 





RCCI5TERE 



TflAOE. MARK 



TO POLISHERS 



If corundum be next in hardness to the 
diamond, and if emery be iron ore and 
corundum, (as stated by the United States 
Government Report), will it not pay you to 
use our pure Craig Mine Crystal Corundum ? 
It is not adulterated with emery. 



NA/rito for 



rices. 



lhe Canada Corundum Company, u«w 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



19 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



May 28, 1904 



with this attachment, and, as an ex- 
ample, the 24-inch drill with this attach- 
ment handles one and one-half-inch pipe 
taps, or two-inch standard taps, verv 
satisfactorily. Cast iron parts can be 
tapped with one-inoh. <»r smaller taps 
without the use of the back gears, and. 
since the taps can be started quickly 
and true, great reductions are made in 
the cost of- tapping 1 over the old meth- 
ods of doing this class of work. 

The attachment contains improved ex- 
pansion ring friction clutches, which 
work noiselessly and very satisfactorily, 
allowing the spindle to be revolved in 
either direction bv the moving of the 
conveniently placed band lever shown 
at the left. While doing light or heavy 
tapniii"-. these clutches will not stick, 
and will not require any undue pressure 
!o engage or disengage, an objectionable 
feature to many friction clutches. 

Bv using the Cincinnati upright drills 
with this attachment excellent 

results are obtained, and in nine out of 
every ten shops where any tanning is 
to be done the cost of the machine will 
easily be saved within a verv short 
time. This description applies to the 
24-inch drill and larger sizes. 

Machinery and Electrical Notes. 

The (ialt Blast Furnace Co., an in- 
dustry only just acquired by (ialt, is 
going to build a foundry. 

Machinery is being installed as quick- 
ly as possible in the C. P. R. shops in 
V\'innipeg. 

The ratepayers of St. Catharines have 
cariied the by-law granting the bonus 
to J. M. Ross & Go., Brantford, manu- 
facturers of traction engines, etc. 

The contract for the installation of 
electric lighting in the new Union Bank 
building in Winnipeg, has been awarded 
to the. K. S. Harrison Co., Ltd. 

The ratepayers of Preston, Ont. , are 
considering the project of purchasing 
the electric light plant at Blair and 
moving it to Preston. 

The John McDougall Co. is construct- 
ing at the Caledonia Iron Works two 
concentration plants, under license from 
the Canadian Ore Concentration Syndi- 
cate, who control the Canadian patent 
for the concentration of ores by the El- 
more oil process. 

The Notre Dame Hospital authorities 
are now erecting a .+200,0(10 hospital in 
Lafontaine Park, .Montreal, for con- 
tagious diseases. They are installing a 
complete electric plant, the contract for 
which is in the hands of the Standard 
Construction Co., Place d'Armes, Mont- 
real. Besides the service plant there will 
be special heating apparatus. The wir- 
ing of the building is to be in steel con- 
duit, and up-to-date in every particular. 



CONDENSED MACHINERY ADVERTISEMENTS. 



MACHINERY WANTED. 



Notices under this heading inserted free for subscribers to 
Hardware and Metal. 



BOILER WANTED— Good second-hand boiler 
— 54 x 12, or 6o x 12 ; quote lowest casli 
price. Box M. 8, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. 

LATHE, screw-cutting, about twelve-inch swing; 
must be in good order. Box M. 10, Hard- 
ware and Metal, Toronto. 

MINING tools wanted, steam pump or ejector, 
forge, hammers, sledge, i-in. steel, etc. Box 
15, Hardware and Metal, Toronto. 

CTEAM ENGINE WANTED— About 7 h.p., 
*J stationary. Address, with particulars and 
lowest price, Box M 12, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. 

WANTED — 18-in. turret lathe; second-hand, if 
in good condition. Box M 13, Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. 

WANTED — Second-hand gasoline engine — tn 
good repair ; 2 to 4 horsepower. Box 8, 
Markham. 

V\7 ANTED— Immediately— Portable sawmill— 
» * to cut from three to five million feet mixed 
timber, pri cipally birch ; would prefer party who 
would take timber from stump and deliver lumber 
at station. Hanna & Hutcheson Bros., Hunts- 
ville, Ont. 



w 



ANTED — Good second-hand jointer and 
rounder. E. McNabb, Arva P. O., Ont. 



WANTED — Hydraulic press ; capacity at least 
200 tons. Address, giving size and full par- 
ticulars, to Box M 11, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. 



MACHINERY FOR SALE. 



Special rates will be quoted for notices under this heading 
for periods of three months or longer. 



A GASOLINE ENGINE— That has stood the 
test and proven to be the most economical 
evero h erated in America. Made by Tuerk Iron 
Works, Berlin, Ont. 

BLACKSMITH'S tools, stock and woodwork- 
ing tools in first-class shape. Apply G. H. 
Morris, Hatchley P. O. 



ENGINES — Gas, gasoline, stationery and ma- 
rine. E. Housev, manufacturer; 815 Queen 
west, Toronto. 

FOUR double drum hoisting engines for imme- 
diate delivery ; with or without boilers. H. 
W. Petrie; Toronto. 



ELEVATORS for freight and passenger service. 
Write for particulars to Parkin Elevator 
Works, Hamilton, Ont. 



ESTIMATES given on forced and induced 
draft fans for steam plants. Sheldon & Shel- 
don, Gait. 



GAS and gasoline engines, stationary, marine, 
automobile ; also launches ; silver medal, 
highest award Dominion Exhibition, Toronto ; 
also Toronto Exhibition, 1902; write for catalogue. 
The Gasoline Engine Co. of Toronto Junction, 
Limited. 

20 



LI FAVY portable engines— 21 to 50 h, p.; on 

* ' wheels or skids; for sawmill work; prompt 
delivery; low prices; send for catalogue. The 
Robert Bell Engine and Thresher Co. , Limited, 
Seaforth, Ont. 

UOISTING ENGINES, derricks, continuous 

* ' concrete mixers, 250 yards capacity; dump 
cars, railway construction cars, track-laying tools, 
boilers, etc. Marsh & Henthorn, Belleville, Ont. 

MACHINE TOOLS— I have for immediate de- 
livery a large stock of lathes, planers, shap- 
ers, millers, radial and other drills, punches and 
shears, bolt cutters, hammers, presses, etc., etc ; 
send for stock list. H. W. Petrie, Toronto. 



NEW STATIONARY ENGINES — 20 x 24 
Waterous sawmill engine ; 14 x 18 Waterous 
sawmill engine ; 9 x 10 McEwen engine ; 13 x 14 
McEwen engine. Waterous, Brantford. 



MORTHERN IRON WORKS, Winnipeg— New 
»' Barnes lathe, 13-in. swing, 7 ft. bed; in per- 
fect condition, cheap; Porter lathe, 14-in. swing, 6 
ft. bed; almost new; bargain; new shaper, 16 x 20, 
and countershaft; best make; cheap. 



MORTHERN IRON WORKS, Winnipeg— 
1~ Steam plant, consisting of a famous Buckeye 
high speed automatic 50 n. p engine, Leonard re- 
turn tubular boiler 70 h. p., smokestack and steam 
pump; a bargain is offered for quick sale. This is 
a first-class outfit, and our price is away down low. 



DATENT, well introduced ; big money to live 
' man acquainted with machinery or mechanics. 
Fred. R. Cole, 138a St. [ames street. Montreal. 



ROCK DRILLS for waterworks excavating, 
quarries and mines; steam hoists for builders, 
mines and quarries; simple, compound and triple 
marine engines, for pleasure launches. The Do- 
minion Rock'Drill Co., Napanee, Ont. 



SIX horse-power engine and boiler, cheap ; three 
horse gas engine, seen working. 102 St. Law- 
rence street, Montreal. 



THE A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO., 
' Limited, Toronto, have for sale for prompt 
shipment the following; Two 10" four side mould- 
ers, new; 42" new sand papering machine; new 
40" Cowan resaw machine. Send for prices. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO. — Temporary ware- 
' house, 124 Bay — standard scales, valves, 
trucks, letter presses, shafting, hangers, pulleys 
belting, mill supplies, machine tools ; " Fair- 
banks " gas and gasoline engines ; write for price 
list. 



THE STUART MACHINERY CO., Winni- 
1 peg — One 50-light dynamo, direct connection 
with gasoline engine; 20 electric motors and dyna- 
mos, from Yi horse power to 1,000 lights; sole 
agents for McGregor-Gourlay's iron-working and 
wood. working machinery. 



AGENCY WANTED. 



WANTED— To secure agency in Manitoba 
town for modern gasoline engine ; state 
terms and commission. Box M 14, Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



...THE... 

Bennett Manufacturing Co. 

Bennett's Patent Shelf Box and Cabinets 

for Hardware, Grocery, Seed and 

Drug Trades, etc. 

Owing to 
the steady 
and rapid 
growth of 
ourbusiness 
new quar- 
ters were 
needed. 

Address all communications to our New Factory : 

Picl<©ring, Ontario 




The original and only Genuine 
Preparation for Cleaning Cut- 
lery. 6d. and Is. Canisters 



OAKEY'S 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Hills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORMAN, 644 Craig: Street 

MONTREAL. 

MADE IN CANADA 




Threshermen, Attention! 

The Threshing belt that gives the greatest 
satisfaction is the " Maple Leaf " 

Stitched Cotton 
Duck Belt 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 

Dominion Belting Company 



HAHILTON, ONTARIO. 



ited 



Ask your deajer for it and take no othtr. 
Beware of Imitations 

Our " Maple Leaf" Belt Dressing is the 
best on the market — made only by us. 



I will take off 
my hat to 




ASK YOUR DEALER 

OR 

WRITE DIRECT. 



Manganese 

Anti-Friction Metal 



said an engineer the other 
day. 

Because it is the best 
Babbitt made. 
Every pound guaranteed. 



Syracuse Smelting Works, 



Montreal, 
New York, 
Seattle. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
"Take Down ' 
Gun Made 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO, 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers. 
Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass., U.S.A. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 



Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 

ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. 




NEW YORK OFFICE, 155 Chambers St 
NEWARK, N.J., U.S.A. 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



TRADE MARK 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"quality unquestioned." 

Each pair of our shears bears the above trade mark 



Complete Line TRIMMERS , BANKERS', BARBERS' and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 




Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIEBUSCH & HILGER, Limited, NEW YORK, Sole Agents. 



Latest Cata- 
logue will be 

sent in 

exchange for 

your business 

card. 



21 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



May 28, 1904 



A QUESTION OF LATHE QUALITY. 



IN last week's issue "Machinist" 
raised the question as to what is 
the best iron-working lathe on the 
Canadian market, also asking how the 
Canadian-built lathe would compare 
with American or other foreign lathes. 

To discuss the question fairly many 
considerations must he taken into ac- 
count. On the one hand American 
lathes, on entry into this market, have 
to pay a duty of 25 per cent., which 
gives a material advantage to the Can- 
adian machine tool builder. On the 
other hand, the Canadian manufacturer 
has a market including about 6,0(Kl,'»i!ii 
people, as compared with nearly 80,000,- 
000 supplied by his American competi- 
tor. This, by enabling the latter to 
make a greater variety of designs and 
to adapt his product to the needs of a 
greatly diversied field, gives him a dis- 
tinct advantage over the Canadian. 

Which advantage is the greater ? And 
has the Canadian manufacturer made 
use of the protection afforded him by the 
duty to bring his quality to a par or 
superior to the American lathe offering 
at the same price here ? 

To give a satisfactory answer to this 
question Hardware and Metal has sought 
Hie opinion of some of the Canadian 
authorities. It will be seen from the 
interviews below that there is consider- 
able diversity of opinion. 

THE FAIRBANKS CO. 

In response to Hardware and Metal's 
query A. F. Brown, machinery expert of 
the Fairbanks Co., said, "I consider the 
Bertram and the Crosby lathes the best 
manufactured in Canada, while the Am- 
erican Machine Tool Co., and the Lodge 
tV Shipley Co., Cincinnati, build the 
best American lathes." 

"How does the best American engine 
lathe compare in price and quality with 
the Canadian ?" 

"Well, in the States the American 
lathe has about the same value that the 
Canadian tool has in Canada and, there- 
fore, the American lathe on the Cana- 
dian market is more expensive than the 
Canadian lathe by the amount of duly. 
As regards quality, 1 must acknowledge 
that the best American lathe is from 30 
to Hi per cent, more efficient than the 
best Canadian. The American lathe is 
mure efficient in that it is more up-to- 
date, better workmanship being put on 
it, because the average Canadian is no1 
quite as able as the average American. 
The best American lathe is built to 
suit the new high speed steel, and is 
provided with gearing for the varying of 
speed, while all Canadian-built lathes 
still have the speed cone, pulley and 
belting, and arc not suited for the most 



economical use of high speed steel. As 
yet the American lathe is, without 
doubt, the best on the Canadian market. 
In time the Canadian builder will be 
able to compete with the American 
builder in every particular, but such is 
not the case at the present time." 

"Have you a larger sale of American 
machine tools than for Canadian ?" 

"Decidedly so ! We have just received 
a large order from Petric, Guelph, Out., 
and there is not a Canadian tool in the 
lot asked- for. The same was true of 
orders received from the Canadian West- 
inghouse Co., Hamilton." 

"Does the average small machinist or 
foundryman purchase Canadian or Am- 
erican lathes ?" 

"In such cases the price often decides 
the buyer, and for that reason there are 
more Canadian than American lathes in 
operation in the small or the avcrage- 
si/.cd machine shops and foundries in 
Canada." 

THE LEVY, WESTON & M'LEAN MACHINERY CO. 

Weston, of the Levy, Weston & Mc- 
Lean Machinery Co., Toronto, was of 
the opinion that the engine lathe marie 
by some Canadian tool builders was 
equal in worth to any imported lathe. 
There is no lathe more efficient for the 
price than those built by the MacGrcg- 
or-Gourlay Co., Limited, Gait, or by 
John Bertram & Sons Co., Limited, 
Dundas," said Mr. Weston, "Then the 
London Machine Tool Co., London, Ont., 
R. MacDougall Co., Limited, Gall, Out., 
and G. A. Crosby & Co., of Sarnia, 
Ontario, all manufacture good engine 
lathes. 

"Of course, the American builder 
specializes and, therefore, he can turn 
out special lathes for special work, and 
there he has the advantage over the 
Canadian builder, since in Canada it 
would not pay builders to install speci- 
al machinery for the manufacture of 
lathes only, for there is not Ihe demand 
in this market to warrant such an out- 
lay. 

"Yet in ordinary machine shop and 
foundry practice the Canadian-built 
lathe finds preference, and the majority 
of lathes now installed are Canadian. 

"Yes," concluded Mr. Weston, "I cer- 
tainly think that Canadian-built lathes 
are giving as good satisfaction as Am- 
erican." 

A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO. 

A. II. Williams, of the A. R. Williams 
Machinery Co., Toronto, was satisfied 
that the best Canadian-built engine 
lathe was quite as good as the best Am- 
erican product. "Of course," he said in 

22 



reply to Hardware and Metal's enquiry, 
"since the American manufacturers' 
field is so much larger than the' Can- 
adian makers, there are a great many 
more good American lathes than there 
are good Canadian ones. But, on the 
other hand, there are also more second- 
class American than Canadian lathes 
American tool builders have both the 
American and Canadian markets, while 
Canadian tool builders have only the 
Canadian market, which is, compared 
with the American market, quite small, 
and therefore American tool builders 
have a better chance than Canadian 
tool builders, in that the largeness of 
their market gives them room to special- 
ize. It is, too, quite evident that a 
firm who build only lathes should be 
able to turn out a better tool than a 
firm who manufacture three or four 
different tools as Canadian firms do." 

In reply to a question regarding the 
monetary value of Canadian and Ameri- 
can lathes, Mr. Williams said that the 
price ranged according to make of tool, 
the best American engine lathe being 
more expensive that the best Canadian 
engine lathe by the amount of duty. 

"Then," suggested Hardware and Met- 
al, "it would pay Canadian machinists 
and foundrymen to put in Canadian 
lathes." 

"Yes !" said Mr. Williams, "and by 
far the greater number of engine lathes 
in use in Canadian machine shops and 
foundries are of Canadian build." 

GEO. B. FRANK. 

Editor Hardware and Metal : Re- 
garding the relative merits of Canadian 
and American made lathes, I regret to 
state that the machine tools manufac- 
tured in Canada to-day are of an in- 
ferior class to those made in the United 
States. 

I myself am deeply interested in fur- 
thering the manufacturing industries of 
Canada, and nowhere in the world is 
there a better field, a market which 
shows signs of a continual growth, than 
in the Dominion to-day. 

In the first place I cannot find that 
there is one original design in the line 
of a machine tool made here. The 
method is to import a tool as a pattern, 
providing the demand will warrant the 
outlay for the particular class of tool 
imported. 

I know of engine lathes made here Ihe 
centres of which would be from | to j 
of an inch out of true. I saw a 72 inch 
Universal drilling machine the gears of 
which did not mesh properly, with the 
result that when the machine was in 
operation it made a noise not unlike a 
threshing outfit. 

I can cite two cases (not a thousand 
miles from Toronto either) in two ciif- 



May 28, 1904 



MACHINERY 



Hardware and Metal 



Cerent cities, where milling machines METALS, THEIR ORIGIN AND NATURE. 

copied after American millers, and made ^tCTvJ „ „ r ^ , 

, , , , , . iONV<it By Geo. B. Frank. 

by a reputable firm here, were replaced ^^rup* VtVS 

by the very tools they were patternec^pA. - ^ Qfr3. 2— Cjpp^ER. In 1898 Butte and her suburb Ana- 
after, because of some trifling defects, ^JOV V^^^A*"' .U-l Pas sine COnJa P roduced 250,000,000 lbs. of cop- 
which could easily have been remedied WjJM 1^. throueh the per ' which - valued at P^sem P r 'ces 
before the machine left the factory. CV^jP^T^ ^. , n M ",;„ with its gold and silver, would be some 
()l course I have found some cases / j»P,^ IB ^ h *- ,. ,„„, ,„,,. ,. 

. . / Bk Ul. fl „ i rl c n f $50,000,000, the number of men em- 

vvjierc Canadian made tools are Riving / ^■k^ 1 m n c i u s o i 

.... . , . ■ / M M; nnps . nt , ployed to dig out this great wealth being 

satisfaction, but they are few and lar / WM I Minnesota ' 6 

between, awa\ in the minority. ^HbP jfl I andtheprai- 

i . ,, • i r i \ Wk ^1 r .. i I here are al present 38 mines in Mon- 

In talking to a tool manufacturer re- \ A /^> ■ ne of the . v . J . «™ " 

T , , u - . i \ MK *U W , tana varying m depth trom 500 to 2.200 

centlj 1 ventured to ask him whj he \ ^M i^H V Dakotas, r eet 

could not turn out goods with the snap \^ |k\ ^ the traveler The following statistics will give an idea 

and finish and general get up of ^^ ^Jr finds him- to what extent copper is used the world 

his American competitor. Ills answer ^^^^^^^^ self nearing over - 

was that "the people over here would that part of the country so appropriately England, imported from the United T ° nS ' 

not pay the price. called " the Land of Sunset." Out in r States and elsewhere 113,003 

It seems rather queer that with a , Germany 63,572 

tariff of 25 per cent, and freight in their that great expanse of territory known as France 36,988 

favor that the Canadian manufacturer the Northwest lies the State of Montana, The estimated consumption of copper 
is not able to meet competition. I do which has become renowned the world m the Lrnted States per annum is 240,000 
not intend to enter into a discussion of over for its vast deposits of mineral to f ns - The total production by all nations 
1101 intend to enter into a discussion 01 1 of the wor i c j w h er e ore is found, for the 
the tariff here, suffice to say that I re- wealth. year ]902 was 542470 tons Qf ^ 
gret very much to write as I do in fav- The metropolis of Montana is Butte amount Canada and Newfoundland pro- 
of of anything foreign. I feel like every without doubt j i iannesb urg is the only J uc ° d 19 >* 85 tons - T he dividends paid 
Canadian, that I have met in every . .. . , , c . . '/ by the various companies operating these 
walk of life, that it is a duty owing to other Clt y on tlle globe of equal interest to mines are enormous . The four corpora . 
Canada, and Canadians as individuals, the financial world. The life blood of the tions I am about to mention paid the fol- 
to foster and promote the growth- of world's financial operations being gold, to lowing dividends from January 1, 1903, to 
home production. The above facts are T . , . , ., . ... . , December 1 1903 • 
as I find them Johannesburg must be given the credit of ' a ° 

GEO. B. FRANK. supplying the most abundant golden aS^^V.V:.V.V.\\\\\\\\\\\\V. SaSJffi 

an iron-worker's OPINION. stream that has ever flowed from dear old Boston and Montana W. l'.aOo'.OOO 

., .. ,. • . . . . ... Calumet and Hecla 2,500,000 

wah - tj -a,„ -„ „ i M . , . t ,, mother earth. It is stated on good author- 

Editor Hardware and Metal In the . . « The total production of the Calumet 

last issue of Hardware and Metal there .ty that the Rand will long continue to ^ ^^ ^ m the Lake » g 

appeared in the machinery department a nroduce over $100 000 000 a vear in e-old i c .t, c .. .. , 

communication from "Machinist," ask- P . f . ° V fV M c year ■ ,n goid, country alone for the first ten months of 

ing "What is the best iron-working and that under favorab l e conditions as 1903 was 66,800,000 pounds of refined 

lathe offered on the Canadian market?" much of the precious metal will be found copper. This gave employment to 13,629 

in connection with this it might be said there as in America and Australia com- men - 

that there are many good makes of iron- , • , • As a metal used for commercial pur- 
working lathes on the Canadian market ine ' poses the world over, copper ranks next 
to-day, and to differentiate between yet with all this in favor of the South to iron. Wherever brass is found there 
them, and to say decidedly that one ' . _ copper plays the prominent part. It ranks 
make or one kind of lathe is better than Afr 'can city, it seems that Butte, which ^^^ (he meta , s em J, d m ,,*/_ 
the other, would in all probability be has enriched the American nation with trica , work; is very ductile and can easily 
misleading. Ihe varieties of lathes of- hoards of go i d and silver, dug out of its be drawn into wire. 

lered to machinists possess distinctive °. . , ™., . „ • r .. . . . . 

and different features that render them hills, ,s of far m ore importance to the The tempering of this metal is one of 

more or less valuable to the user inas- commercial world, because of its wonder- the ] ? s t l arts - Known to the ancients it 

much as the ideas embodied in the ful deoosits f copper certainly was, as implements and weapons 

make-up of the machine agree or not found in the mounds of the western coun- 

with his ideas as to what constitutes Similar to our own Copper Cliff in On- try, made thousands of years ago, proved 

good practice. If a machinist likes a tario, Butte has no visible agricultural to be as har d as tempered steel. Many 

lathe with which he is working he will . . ' ™. , e .. .... . . , have been the men who have racked their 

in all nrohihilitv <av it i« c <rnr.H in!i,„ land. The slopes of the hills look barren. , . . , ,. a ,, llleir 

in an pionaniniy say it is a good lacne, ' brain in an endeavor to discover this art 

provided of course that the workman- There is not a shrub, or tree, or flower but none have Deen successful 

ship and material are in keeping Let within a radius ot m ;i es . This is caused Of course a time will come when the 

him object, however, to some part and . . , . , , . c .1 • x . i ... . 

there is no doubt he will say it is not by the roasting process to which the ore is output of these mines ot to-day will be 

a good machine. In brief, the goodness subjected before it is consigned to the exhausted. Even the mountains and hills 

or DOOrness of a machine is vprv nftpn c .. t-u- .• • • i surrounding these great hives of industrv 

- i""' 1 ""* oi a iiiaciiiiit is \ery oiten a smelter. This roasting process is a simple ... • , °. , , , ,. V 

personal matter with the people direct- . r .. , , will in a century or two crumble and dis- 

ly interested, although it cannot be one ' A layer of wood is placed upon the appear, and the quartz lodes and mineral 

fpiestioned that there are grades both ground, then a layer of ore, and vice will take less time, and when the last 

high and low in the lathe output as well versa until the pile has reached a desired ounce of mineral has been taken out, and 

aS Comparecl'wit r h Mner.ean lathes v, 1„, height. The entire mass is set on fire and th , e hu ™ a " d «hirr of the smelter has been 

compared wp American lathes, value , , , ... „. r , silenced, these grand monuments ot iron 

for value our Canadian machines are the sulphur eliminated. The powerful and steel reared M the hand of man, will 

Rr^r,,!!!^?^ fumes arising and permeating the atmos- become as desolate as the plain. The 

ever, it is a fact that there is a more phere destroy every vestige of vegetation. glory and wealth of these mines will be- 

expensive line of American lathe in the Such is one of the sacrifices made to the come a tradition and the greatness of the 

Canadian market to-day, than is actu- surface of the earth that the secrets gar- Copper Kings will be no more, for, after 

ally made in this country. . all, We are such stud as dreams are 

IRON WORKER. nere d m her bosom may be the more made of, and our little life is rounded with 

Montreal, May 25, 1904. eagerly sought for. asleep." 

23 



Hardware and Metal 



May 28, 1904 




Artistic Lighting. 

IT is a far cry from the meagre indoor 
illumination of a generation ago to 
the brilliant and highly developed 
state of the art as it exists to-day. The 
coal oil lamp was the great illuminant 
at that time, and then no one dreamed 




RETURNED 




of the possibility of electric lighting, 
with the multiplcitv of uses to which it 
is put. For several years particular 
attention has been paid by manufactur- 
ers on all sides to the development of 
the artistic side of lighting, to add lo 



the appearance of indoor decorations. A 
special study has been made of the re- 
quirements for most effective lighting, 
as well as the proper grouping ofi 
lamps. The needs and demands of lov- 
ers of the beautiful have been consid- 
ered. The result has been that there is 
on the market at the present time a 
line of goods in electrical .fixtures that 
far surpasses anything before attempt- 
ed, and which can hardly fail to be a 
source of admiration. The illustration 
herewith shown represents one of the 
many handsome fixtures manufactured 
by M underl oh & Co.. of Montreal. 

Gas and Electric Plant in College. 

The Mount St. Louis Institute, Mont- 
real is about to have a complete gas and 
electric generating plant for lighting and 
ventilating the entire institution. The 
gas generators have already been in- 
stalled, the product of which is to be 
used to supply a gas engine. This is 
lo lie the motive power for the 25 k.w. 
Westinghouse generator that is being put 
in. Additional wings are being added 
to. the already large building and the 
whole renovated throughout. 

An additional novel feature in con- 
nection with their recent improvements 
is a specally lilted ur> academic hall, 
which is being lavishK decorated and 
profusely illuminated. It is being sup- 
plied with a complete theatre switch- 
board, with dimmers, rheostats, etc., to 
produce any desired scenic effect. This 
is said to be the first time that such a 
feature has been adopted by an educa- 
tional institution in Canada. 

The wiring of the building is to be in 
an enclosed steel conduit, and the fix- 
tures and accessories are to be of the 
at est pattern, and thoroughly up-to- 
date When completed the interior elec- 
tric decoration of the college will pre- 
sent a beautiful and attractive appear- 
ance. 

The authorities claim that they can 
generate the gas to run a gas engine for 
the electric lighting plant and deliver 
the current to the lamps at a very much 
cheaper rate than it is supplied by the 
local companies, and hence the novel in- 
stallal ton . 



Will the Apparatus be Replaced? 
Fire at the home of Dr. Thos. R. 
Eldridge, Philadelphia, destroyed elec- 
trical apparatus which was being de- 
voted to an unusual purpose. Dr. Eld- 
ridge had for some months been making 
a series of experiments, the aim of 
which has been the transforming of 
negroes into whites. Dr. Eldridge was 
doing the bleaching by throwing an X- 
ray light through radium, thus destroy- 
ing the coloring pigment of the skin. 
Several negroes who had undergone 
treatment are now partly white, says 
the Electrical World. With the destruc- 
tion of the electrical appliances the 
work of completing the transformation 
is halted. The patients are, therefore, 
left in a state of what might be termed 
dermatological suspense. It will be 
several months before duplicate appara- 
tus can be built. Meantime, Dr. Eld- 
ridge does not know what will become 
of the blacks. He does not think that 
the whitened parts of the skin will he- 
come black. All he knows just now is 
that there are a half dozen unhappy 
negroes in Philadelphia. 

Marconi Stations. 

THE Canadian Marconi Co. have 
signed a contract to build seven 
stations in the Gulf of St. Law- 
rence and on the Atlantic seaboard. 
The first stations to be constructed are 
lour in number, and are to be located as 
follows: Fame Point, Heath Point, 
Point Amour and Belle Isle. The first 
is on the Gaspe coast. Heath Point is 
on Antieosti Island, Point Amour is on 
the Labrador coast, and the Belle T sle 
station will be located on Belle Isle 
island. The stations mentioned will 
control the northern passage, being all 
within easy distance of any vessel tak- 
ing the route north of Newfoundland 
either in or out of the gulf. These four 
stations are to be erected during 
June, July and August of this year, and 
it is expected that they will all be com- 
plete and in working order by t'.e 'line 
mentioned, if not sooner. Much of the 
material is already manufactured, but 
there are houses to erect for the oper- 
ators, poles for the carrying of the cur- 
rents to be placed in position, etc. 



24 



May 28, 1904 



ELECTRICAL GOODS AND SUPPLIES 



Hardware and Metal 



LET THE PUBLIC KNOW 



ELECTRICAL fixtures and electrical 
floods should sell easily in a hard- 
ware store for it is the natural 
place in which to look for such goods. 
Only by an accident and by lack of ag- 
gressive action has this trade been de- 
nied most hardware stores. Bui al- 
though electrical goods should sell 
easily they will not seil themselves. It 
is indeed doubtful whether any line of 
goods can be sold successfully and pro- 
litably without the intelligent and sys- 
tematic pushing of the salesmen and 
store management. 

Hence the hardware merchant who de- 
cides to stock electrical goods must de- 
vote to the development of his new de- 
partment all the energy and push at bis 
command. He must start right by 
taking the public into his confidence and 
letting them know what he is doing. 
The fact remains that, whereas there is 
no reason why the hardware store 
should not get this trade, in many 
towns the public are not accustomed to 
look to it for these goods. They must 
be educated to do so, and hence at the 
outset it is necessary to advertise 
widely the fact that a new department 
has been added to the store. Let every 
probable customer know that he can buy 
his electrical fixtures from John Blank, 
the hardware man. 

The man whose whole attention is 
centred upon his own store, to the de- 
velopment of which he is giving his 
best thought, is too apt to imagine that 
the public know without being told of 
all his new departments. But the pub- 
lic are not mind readers,, and they have 
other interests. Moreover, their mem- 
ories are short and they require to be 
reminded constantly of what is being 
done in the hardware store. They will 
not know that an additional department 
has been added to John Blank's hard- 
ware store unless they are told of it, 
and they will soon forget about it unless 
John Blank persistently directs their 



attention to it. The new department 
must be advertised. 

It has been remarked by some one that 
trying to do business without advertis- 
ing, without taking the public into your 
confidence and letting them see and hear 
what you are doing, is like winking at 
a girl in the dark. You know what you 
are doing, but no person else does. 

Therefore, let in the light of publicity 
on the electrical department of the 
store. Make a big announcement in the 
local papers and follow it up by regular 
advertising. Carry as large an assort- 
ment as possible, and display it to the 
best advantage. Let electrical goods 
have the right of way in the window 
displays for a few weeks, and do every- 
thing possible to impress the buying 
public with the importance of the new 
department. Persistent effort is .bound 
to bring good results, for there is a big 
field to be developed. 



Electrical Novelties. 

John Forman, Montreal, is now hand- 
ling "Ever Ready Electric Lights." 
manufactured by the American Electri- 
cal Novelty and Mfg. Co. A neat cata- 
logue describing these novelties is to 
hand. It is full of illustrations, describ- 
ing the many uses to which these minia- 
ture lamps are put . 



GAVE A WRONG ADDRESS. 

An article published in a recent issue 
stated that Ross & Matthews, of Dun- 
das, Out., were adding tinsmithing to 
their business. The address given was 
a wrong one, as Ross & Matthews eon- 
duet a general hardware, paint, seed and 
tinsmithing business in Cannington, 
Out. 



AUTOMATIC SPRING WINDER. 

THE Smith & Eemenway Co. of X". 
206 Broadway, New York, have 
undertaken the entire marketing 
of the automatic spring winder made h\ 
the Best Tool Co. of, Boston, .Mass. 
The method of using it is shown in the 
accompanying illustration, also its adap- 
tability for hand and power work, with 
mandrel in vise < r lathe. This spring 




winder is made in two sizes, No. 633 
."> inches long, and No. 634 9 1-2 inches 
long. The former is being made to 
manipulate wire in Brown and Sharp 
gauges, Nos. 36 to 12 inclusive, and 
the latter No. 634 wires in gauge 24 
to 3 inclusive. The tension and spac- 




ing plates are of Coe bronze, with mal- 
leable iron handles. Special springs can 
he easily improvised by the automatic 
spring winder if wires and proper mand- 
rels are at hand. Applications for 
catalogues and price lists relative to the 
winder will have the prompt attention 
of the Smith & Hemenway Co. 



\A/e make Electric Fixtures, Sockets and Cut-Outs 




lectrical Supplies of" all kinds. 



MONTREAL. 



25 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 




Ice Cream Freezers 



are well-known, sell quickly 
and giv e good s atisfaction. 



Model Refrigerators, returne 

JUL •« 190^ 

Leonard Refrigerators. 6 ^^ 



Model Oil Stoves an" Ovens. 
Boss Gasoline Stoves. 

We can ship these seasonable goods 
promptly. Write for printed matter. 




The Model. 



London, 



IVIoClary Manufacturing 

Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, Vancouver, 



St. John, N.B. 



Ivory-thing -for -the Tinshop." 



26 



May 28, 1904 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN. 
Montreal. 

,hc HacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



OFFICES, 



Montreal 



Toronto 



- 232 McGill Street. 

Telephone Main 1255. 

10 Front Street East. 

Telephone Main 2701. 

Winnipeg, Man. - Room 308, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

L. P. Luxton. 

London, Eng. - - 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim. 

Manchester, Eng. - 92 Market Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 

ST. JOHN, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

NEW York - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg. 

W. T. Robson. 
Vancouver, B.C. - Geo. S. B. Perry. 



Subscription, Canada and United States, $2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere • ■ 12s 



Published every Saturday. 
^Address J Adscript. London. 



AN ACTIVE FALL TRADE. 

BUSINESS men, not only in hard- 
ware and metal lines, but in prac- 
tically all lines, are looking forward to 
Fall business with keen anticipations of 
an activity which will in large measure 
make up for the comparatively poor 
Spring trade. 

It is a fact that at the moment busi- 
ness is in particularly good condition, 
at least so far as manufacturers and 
wholesale houses are concerned. Yet 
the backward Spring, which retarded 
building operations and kept farmers 
away from the stores, so reduced the 
volume of trade in February, March and 
April that it is hardly probable that the 
activity of May and June will make up 
for what was then lost. 

To the Fall, then, merchants and 
manufacturers look forward with great 
interest. It is, consequently, decidedly 
gratifying to note the widespread feel- 
ing of confidence regarding the prospec- 
tive Fall trade. 

Possibly the most promising feature 
of the situation is the briskness of 



building operations. In British Colum- 
bia mining activity and the development 
of farming districts of the Fraser Val- 
ley have combined with the increase of 
population in the cities to create a need 
lor buildings of all kinds in dial pro- 
vince. The continuance of the heavy 
how of immigration into the Northwest 
and Manitoba, and the rapid develop- 
ment of Winnipeg as a commercial cen- 
tre have resulted in building operations 
from "the great lakes to the Rockies" 
at an unprecedented rate. In Ontario 
and Quebec the extension of manufac- 
turing plants and the increase of their 
staffs has caused a general shortage of 
houses, felt most keenly in the larger 
cities, yet manifest even in the towns 
and villages. In Western Ontario every 
town seems to be boasting of a building 
boom. 

In consequence of this there is every 
reason to expect a continuance of the 
heavy lumbering trade that has con- 
tributed so largely to the prosperity of 
the northern counties of Ontario and 
Quebec, while contractors, builders, sup- 
ply men of all kinds, are bound to share 
in the prosperity caused by much build- 
ing. The hardware trade is particu- 
larly influenced by such extensive opera- 
tions. 

In the Maritime Provinces the out- 
look, while not so roseate as in the 
western section of the Dominion, is by 
no means unsatisfactory. ' p - u e, busi- 
ness has been curtailed by iu c unfavor- 
able weather, yet there is general pros- 
perity in these provinces, and the indi- 
cations point to a steady improvement. 

Another factor which must be taken 
into consideration as likely to add ma- 
terially to the business of the country 
during the Fall is railway construction. 
The passage of the Grand Trunk Pacific 
Bill by the Dominion Parliament is now 
assured. The early commencement of 
operations along this great line, not to 
mention the lines to be built by the C. 
P. R., by Mackenzie & Mann, by the 
Temiskatning Commission, and the score 
or more smaller lines in every province, 
will provide work for thousands and 
will otherwise create needs which must 
be supplied, generally speaking, by Can- 
adian products. 

Everything considered, there is reason 
for confidence in the Fall trade of 1904. 



MONTREAL CITY CHARTER. 
\\l HEN Rudyard Kipling wrote his 

* now famous poem, " Daughter 
am J in my mother's house, but 
mistress in my own," the reference was 
to the connection between Canada and 
the Old Country. The principle expound- 
ed in these words may be applied with 
equal force to the connection which 
should, but does not, exist between 
Montreal and the Province of Quebec. 
There are many little matters, such as 
the abolition of trading stamps, which 
Montreal should have full authority to 
deal with herself, without being com- 
pelled to go to Quebec. 

At present Montreal is constantly in 
the position of having to apply to the 
Local Legislature for amendments to the 
city charter. As many private interests 
stand behind these proposed amend- 
ments, frequently measures antagonistic 
to the general welfare of the city have 
been hurried through. At last year's 
session of Parliament much legislation 
inimical to Montreal business men was 
passed, and the same thing is being re- 
peated this year. A long string of 
amendments have been before the 
House, some of which aim at setting 
aside some important features of the 
revised city charter, which was created 
by the Reform element of the Citv 
Council. The intention of the new char- 
ter was to give Montreal power to con- 
trol its own affairs, and it certainly rests 
with the Parent Government to reject 
any measure that is brought in with a 
view to tying the hands of the city. 

LOWER PIG IRON PRICES. 

One depressing note is heard in the 
market reports this week. The con- 
sumption of pig iron in the United 
States has been seriously curtailed with 
a consequent overproduction. The re- 
sult has been that for the last two bi 
three weeks prices have been unsteady, 
culminating this week in a reduction at 
Pittsburg of 50c per ton, with the 
probability of still lower quotations. 

The Canadian market is so sensitive 
to fluctuations in the United States that 
this reduction in pig iron is bound to 
have a somewhat depressing effect on 
the situation here. At the moment 
prices are nominally unchanged, but it 
is not unlikely thai further concessions 
will be made. 



27 



Hardware and Metal 



EDITORIAL 



May 28, 1904 



CANADA'S UNDERPAID JUDICIARY. 



THE many readers of this paper who 
have followed the articles in 
Hardware and Metal advocating higher 
salaries for the Supreme Court judges, 
will find sound logic ' in the following 
from the Ottawa Citizen : 

"The article which we reprint in an- 
other place in this issue from Hardware 
and Metal on the subject of judicial sal- 
aries in Canada, has our hearty endors- 
ation. It shows a healthy state of na- 
tional sentiment when the rights of one 
class in the community are fearlessly 
advocated by the press of another class 
in the interest of all. It is advocacy of 
the most telling kind. That the salaries 
of judges in this country are so inade- 
quate as to be on the mean side is obvi- 
ous to any one who takes the slightest 
trouble to look into the matter, in the 
past we have been able to secure able 
and upright men to fill our judicial of 
fices notwithstanding the meagre 
remuneration attached to them, but in 
view of the rapidly increasing cost of 
living throughout the Dominion have we 
any right to expect a continuation of 
our good fortune in this respect ? In 
the senate, in September, 1891, the late 
Senator Dickie called the attention of 
the Government of the day to the ques- 
tion in hand. In the course of his jc- 
marks he said : 

" 'I have no personal interest in the 
matter beyond that which attaches to 
any member of this House who is in- 
terested in having an efficient adminis- 
tration of justice. This end will not 
be attained unless by an adequate and 
independent judiciary. The scale of 
salaries attached to these high offices 
was arranged shortly after confedera- 
tion. During that period, which has 
been the life of the nation to which we 
belong, we have seen throughout very 
large increases, beginning with the in- 
demnity of members of parliament, and 
increases in salaries of ministers, tuid 
increases in the salaries of almost 
every public officer down to the oottom 
and yet the salaries of the judges have 
remained stationary.' 

"What Senator Dickie said then with 
so much force gains additional strength 
when quoted after thirteen years of in- 



action in the matter. It is not becom- 
ing to the dignity of Canada that it 
should be said of her that her judici- 
ary is the poorest paid of any in the 
chief British possessions. It is the 
smallest sort of cant for us to laud the 
probity of our judges on the one hand, 
and to deny them salaries commensur- 
ate with their work and dignity on the 
other. It is an old saying that a well- 
paid bench makes justice cheap. An 
unsound judge is dear at any price; 
and it is no answer to say that he can 
be put right on appeal. That means as- 
ditional expense and delay to the well- 
to-do suitor; to the poor man it means 
in the majority of instances enforced ac- 
quiescence in a denial of justice. The 
better the judges the fewer the ap- 
peals. By all means, then, let us make 
it possible for our best lawyers to go 
on the bench without facing one of the 
hardest of all trials, — poverty in high 
position." 

The Citizen touches the vital point of 
the whole case. Canadians are proud 
of their judicial system, we never cease 
praising the probity and strength of our 
judges, yet though the wages of every 
class in the community have been advanc- 
ed we continue our Supreme Court 
judges at salaries which were too small 
at confederation, but are now absolute- 
ly niggardly. It is our boast that only 
safe, strong, conservative men are 
sought for judicial honors, yet the sal- 
ary attached to the highest judicial po- 
sition a Canadian lawyer can be invited 
to take is such that to take it a first- 
class lawyer must make a financial sac- 
rifice which none should be expected to 
make, and which few can afford to. 



M 



A SERIOUS IMPERFECTION. 
AYOBS and city councils are 
time and again accused of laxity 
in the discharge of their duties 
and indifference to the interests of their 
respective municipalities. These charges 
are usually so well founded that the 
public has come to look on muni- 
cipal councils as pretty poor business 
concerns. Oftentimes they advise their 
councils to imitate the boards of trad': 
28 



and follow the footsteps of such pr - 
gressive institutions as the Manufactur- 
ers' Association. 

Mayor Urquhart of Toronto has re- 
versed all this. He has given an ex- 
ample of progressiveness that is truly 
welcome in this age of degenerate muni- 
cipal officials, and he has not only 
shown his own value, but has brought 
both the Toronto Board of Trade and 
the Toronto branch of the Canadian 
Manufacturers' Association into an un- 
enviable light. 

A short time ago Mayor Urquhart in- 
formed the secretary of the Toronto 
branch of the Manufacturers' Associa- 
tion and Mr. J. F. Ellis, president of 
the Toronto Board of Trade, that a 
Mexican trade commissioner would 
shortly be in Ottawa to negotiate with 
the Dominion Government for Atlantic 
and Pacific steamship services between 
Mexico and Canada. Mayor Urquhart 
suggested that the commissioner be in- 
vited to Toronto. Receiving no response, 
he offered to extend the city's hospital- 
ity to the commissioner. Then he was 
calmly informed that the manufacturers 
were too busy to consider the ques- 
tion. 

This incident certainly reflects on the 
manufacturers. Doubtless they are 
busy, but it does not follow that their 
organization should thereby be incapa- 
citated from dealing with such a propo- 
sition. The same thing is true of the 
Board of Trade. 

We do not wish to minimize the worth 
of either organization or the ability of 
their respective secretaries, but it seems 
to us that the day has come when the 
work of both bodies should be placed on 
a higher plane. The day of the cleri- 
cal secretary is over. Modern condi- 
tions demand an experienced executive 
head, who shall be unhampered by tech- 
nicalities and shall have a close grasp 
of the great trade questions of the 
day. 

Surely the time has come when such 
an organization as the Manufacturers' 
Association and the leading boards of 
trade, representing tens of million* of 
capital, should have their interests 
placed in the hands of as highly paid 
officials as the manager of any great 
banking institution with only a tithe 
of the capital. A $20,000 a year aggres- 
sive secretary or manager for the Mont- 
real, Toronto or Winnipeg Boards of 
Trade could inaugurate broad plans for 
the development of local and Canadian 
trade that would make him worth his 
salary many times over. 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



THE HERITAGE OF CANADIAN CITIES. 



IN the address delivered by G. B. 
Ryan, the new president of the 
Guelph Board of Trade, some 
thoughts are given expression that 
should be seriously considered by the 
business men in many Canadian towns. 
II is the fact that in many towns the 
residents, to use Mr. Ryan's phrase, 
"let the moss grow on their feet." This 
lack of energy and aggressiveness is 
detrimental to the interests of every 
class in the community, but to none in 
equal degeree as to the merchants. 
Their business is ever the first to re- 
spond to life and activity, or to dull- 
ness and inactivity. Even the farmers 
prefer to trade in a town which has the 
air of industry and progress than in one 
where there is the "quiet ease of men 
content with what they have." Mr. 
Ryan's address was in part as follows : 

"I look upon the Board of Trade of 
any city in point of importance as a 
very close second to the City Council; 
it is generally composed of the cream of 
the business men, a body of men who 
are responsible to a great extent for the 
success or failure of the place. 

"The City of Cfuelph possibly never 
displayed more real life than at the 
present time. Evidences of prosperity 
are to be seen everywhere, but the place 
we will hold among the cities of Canada 
ten years hence will very much depend 
upon the class of business men who will 
handle her business affairs between now 
and then. If they are live, up-to-date, 
progressive, and at the same time cau- 
tious, we will hold a very important 
place among the Canadian cities. 

"I have great faith in this country of 
ours; there is without doubt a great 
future before her. Canada is now on 
the up-grade as never before; she is go- 
ing ahead with leaps and bounds, at a 
pace little dreamed of by the most 
sanguine of us a few years ago. We 
have only within the last few years be- 
come conscious of our strength. People 
from different parts of the world are 
just finding out our rich resources, and 
are fast pouring into our country. I 
think I am sate in saying that no other 
country in the world is prospering in 
proportion to her population as we are 
to-day. Only a few years ago, as you 
know, thousands of our young men were 
leaving Canada every year for the Unit- 
ed States. Five years ago we succeeded 
in inducing 712 of our American cousins 
to make their homes in Canada; last 



year no less than 49,000 cast in their 
lot with us, mostly going to our north- 
west. Three years ago only 42,500 
from all parts of the world located in 
the Dominion; last year 128,900 came to 
Canada, and it is estimated that in the 
last five years from the United States 
alone settlers' effects to the value of 
$19,000,000 and $25,000,000 in cash 
came into this country, and from pres- 
ent indications this year will far out- 
strip the last. I hardly think the most 
optimistic of us realize what the growth 
of this country will be in the next few 
years. When you remember that in the 
last eight years our railway earnings, 
the total amount in our banks, and the 
revenue of the Government have dou- 
bled, may we not ask ourselves what 
this development may be in the next ten 



zi 




G. B\ Ryan, President of the Guelph 
Board of Trade. 

years ? Has it dawned on us what this 
great prosperity may mean to Guelph ? 
This part of Canada, for at least many 
years to some, will be the great machine 
shop for the northwest. As hundrec's of 
thousands of people locate there, our 
present factories will have to be en- 
larged and re-enlarged and many more 
built, and one of the great questions for 
Guelph to settle is : Are we going to 
get our share of this great prosperity, 
or will we stand idly by, with our anus 
comfortablv folded, ■ while the trade 
drifts to other places? This certainly is 
one of the questions the Board of 
Trade should keep well to the front. 

"There are two ways this city can he 
made grow, first, by the enlarging of 



our present factories and establishing 
others, and every reasonable inducement 
should be offered manufacturers to lo- 
cate here, such as free sites, fixed rate 
of assessment for a time, and possibly 
we might go as far as to make loans 
where well secured, but I am almost 
persuaded that the day for bonus giving 
has gone by. Second, by making it 
very easy for people to come from a 
greater distance than they do now to 
do their business in Guelph. This can 
be done by tapping the outlying dis- 
tricts with electric roads. Fifteen years 
from to-day electric roads will be run- 
ning in many places little thought of by 
us now. Will they come our way, will 
they be bringing business into Guelph, 
or will we find ourselves sidetracked, 
and the territory that naturally belongs 
to Guelph cut off by roads carrying 
trade to other places ? This certainly 
will very much depend upon whether thp 
men that are handling the business af- 
fairs of Guelph are to be broad gauge or 
narrow gauge men. If they are to he 
the latter, men who cannot see past 
'the now,' men who never make a move 

itj.1 they see a dead sure thing, men 

lay no plans for the future, men 

•^w-bb are prepared to mount every pro- 

ssive train that may leave 1 the city 

screw on the brakes for all they are 

,Qrth, then we may expect, when peo- 
ple of other cities are walking on 'their 
paved streets, to find the mud still 
sticking to our shoes. I would much 
prefer taking my chances in a poorly 
situated town or city in the hands of 
good live business men, than in a well 
situated place controlled by men who 
allowed the moss to grow on their 
boots; to a very large extent it's the 
men that make the place. If we expect 
strangers to come to our city we must 
let them know we have something speci- 
al to offer, we must make our front 
door swing open easily, we must be 
prepared to offer all that any other city 
of our size can offer for at least the 
same money, or, if possible, more for 
the same. Our city must be well spoken 
of, it must be known as a clean, healthy 
and pretty place, our educational sys- 
tem must be the very best, and at the 
same time our taxes must be in pro- 
portion to what we have to offer." 

In conclusion, Mr. Ryan said it was 
a great pleasure to be able to report 
that Guelph manufacturers were in such 
a flourishing condition at the present 
time that many of them had found it 
necessary to enlarge their present build- 
ings in order to keep pace with the in- 
creased business offering, and as we!! 
that other factories arc being built 



!l 



Hardware and Metal 



May 28, 1904 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, May 27, 1904. 

DURING the present week, Vic- 
toria Day coming in, with a 
suspension of business for 
the day, has meant a slight 
difference in the hardware 
line, as i( is bound to do in all trades. 
The result is that with an active busi- 
ness doing, dealers are greatly rushed to 
keep up with orders, that they may have 
goods shipped promptly. Business is 
still brisk in nearly all lines, and the 
wholesale men are getting a good share 
of the general increase in trade, and 
which they are in good position to meet. 
Import orders have been arriving stead- 
ily by the incoming boats, so that stocks 
are being' well kept up. Tramp schoon- 
ers are now running, thus facilitating 
shipping and opening up another avenue 
for the distribution of goods. A large 
quantity of hardware is being shipped 
by rail and this week one firm sent out 
twelve carloads at one time, to oo to 
different points. 

Prices continue steady, and but one 
change is noted this week, namelv, a 
reduction of 10c a cwt. on rooting pitch. 
While there is no actual shortage in barb 
wire, which is in biff demand, it is hard 
to get in large Quantities. Large ship- 
ments of cement and firebrick have ar- 
rived, so that there is a good supply on 
hand. No shortage is reported in wire 
nails this week. Collections are very 
fair and a large number of, enquiries are 
coming' in. 

Washing Machines— Demand still 
keeps up. We quote as fol- 
lows: Hound (three legs), $35.00 per 
dozen; round (four legs), $39.00 per 
dozen; square (regular size), $42.00 per 
dozen; square (smaller size), $36.00 per 
dozen; round rotary, $56.00 per dozen; 
souare rotary, $50.00 per dozen; "New 
Century," $72.00 per dozen. 

Lawn Mowers— A further big busi- 
ness is reported this week, as might well 
be expected this weather. We quote 
as follows: With 8-inch wheel, 
sizes 12, 14 and 16 inch, $2.65 each; 
with 9-inch wheel, size 12, $3; size 14, 
$3,121-2; size 16, $3.25 each; Philadel- 
phia pattern, size 12, $3.25, size 14, 
$3.50; size 16, $3.75 each; High Wheel, 
size 12, $4; 14, $4.25; 16. $4.50; 18 
$4.75; 20, $5.25 each. 

Garden Hose— The warm spell has had 
its effect on this line, and a big demand is 
the result. Discounts continue: Trade 
75 per cent.; Western, 65 and 10 per 
cent.; White, 40 and 10 per cent.; 
Maroon, 40 and 10 pev cent.; cotton, 
60 per cent. 



Hose Reels— A lively market is re- 
ported, keeping pace with the demand 
for garden hose. Prices 15 to 25 per 
cent, higher than last year. 

Lawn Sprinklers— These are in great 
demand. Prices as before, $2.50 to $18 
a dozen. 

Ice Cream Freezers— The approaching 
Summer has created a big demand, and 
a big business is being done. We 
quote the following range of prices for 
the leading brands : One quart, $1.50 
to $1.60 each; 2 quart, $1.70 to $1.80 
each; 3 quart, $1.95 to $2.25 each; 4 
quart, $2.35 to $2.60 each; 6 quart, 
$2.95 to $3.25 each; 8 quart, $3.70 to 
$4.10 each; 10 quart, $4.75 to $5.50 
each; 12 quart, $5.75 to $6.50 each; 14 
quart, $6.75 to $7.50 each. 

Agricultural Wrenches— There is not 
much change in the demand, which con- 
tinues steady. Discount as before, 25 
per cent. 

Harvest Tools— Trade continues the 
same. Discount as before, 60 per cent. 

Spring Hinges— A good business is be- 
ing done. We quote as follows: No. 5, 
$17.25 per gross; No. 10, $18 per gross; 
-No. 20. $10,50; No. 120, $20; No. 51. 
$9.25; No. 50, $27.50. 

Heavy Screw Hooks and Hinges- 
There is an active' demand in this 
line. Sizes 12 inches and upwards 
are selling at $3.25 per 100 lbs; the 
price of -the 6, 8 and 10-inch sizes is 
$4.25. 

Wire Hat and Coat Hooks— A steady 
trade, with price as before, for 3-inch 
hooks 75c a gross. 

Churns— A sluggish market is report- 
ed. Discounts as before, 40 and 15 
per cent. f. o. b. Montreal and 30 and 
30 per cent. f. o. b. factory. 

Green Wire Cloth— A brisk demand 
for wire cloth this week and a big 
trade is being done. The price is $1.50 
per 100 square feet. 

Poultry Netting— Trade continues ac- 
tive and many orders are reported. Dis- 
counts for 2-inch 19-gauge standard ex- 
tras are 60 and 5; for 2-inch 16-gauge, 
the discounts are 55 and 5 per cent. 

Galvanized Poultry Netting Staples— 
There is a steady business beins' done. 
Prices are: Sizes' 5-8, 3-4, 1 1-8, 10-lb. 
boxes, $12.50 list; 25 an J 50-lb 
boxes, $12.25 list; 100-lb boxes, $12 
list. Less 571-2 per cent. 

Bed Staples — Prices continue as be- 
fore. The discount on the Mont- 
real Rolling Mills Company's and 
the B. Greening Wire Company's lists 
is 57 1-2 per cent. The discounts on the 
Dominion Wire Company's list are 25 
and 2 1-2 per cent. 

Blind Staples— No change is noted. 
Discount as before, 40 oer cent. 

30 



Galvanized Coil Spring Wire— There 
is a fair business being done. 
Our "notations are as follows: 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8, $3.20; No. 9, $2.70; 
No 10, $3.30; No. 11, $3.35; No. 12, 
$2.95; No. 13, $3.10. Carlots 5 cents 
less. Freight prepaid is less than car- 
lots to extent of 25 cents and in car- 
lots to the extent of 20c. 

Galvanized Wire — Trade continues 
fairly active. We quote as fol- 
lows': No. 5, $3.65; Nos. 6, 
7 and 8. $3.10; No. 9, $2.45; No. 
10, $3.15; No. 11, $3.20; No. 12, $2.60; 
No. 13, $2.70; No. 14, $3.70. In car- 
lots f.o.b. Cleveland, No. 5, $2.15; 
Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9, $2.10; No. 10, $2.15; 
No. 11 $2.20; No. 12, $2.25; No. 13, 
$2.35; No. 14, $2.45. In less than car- 
lots 121-2c extra per 100 lbs will be 
charged. 

Barb Wire— There is an unusuallv big 
demand in barb wire at the present 
time, and although there is no actual 
shortage, large shipments are hard 
to get. We quote: $2.75 per 100 
lbs. f. o. b. Montreal, and $2.50 f. o. 
b. Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons $2.40 
f. o. b. Cleveland. 

Smooth Steel Wire— No new feature 
in the market this week. We quote: 
Bright and annealed, $2.50 per 100 
lb. f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, 
London, Hamilton and St. John. Net ex- 
tras per 100 lb are now as follows: 
Coppered wire, 60c; tinned wire. $2; 
oiling, 10c; spring wire, $1.25; best 
steel wire, 75c; bright soft-drawn, 15c; 
hay-baling wire, 20 to 25c. 

Annealed Hay Wire— There is not 
much doing in this line. No change in 
price. Same list, with usual discounts. 

Fine Steel Wire— Small trade is re- 
ported. Discounts 25 per cent., with 
net extras as follows: 1 and 2-lb. banks, 
25c per 100-lbs. ; 1-2-lb. .hanks, 37 l-2c; 
1-4-lb. hanks, 50c. 

Brass Wire— Demand is not very 
great. Discount as before, 60 ner cent. 

Copper Wire— A fair trade is report- 
ed. Discount 60 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— There is an ac- 
tive market and fairly good de- 
mand. Discounts are : Best iron rivets, 
section carriage and wagon box, 
black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets 
and tinned swede rivets, 60 and 10 per 
cent. ; swedes iron burrs are quoted at 
55 per cent, off; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 45 per cent, 
off and coppered iron rivets and burrs, 
in 5-lb carton boxes are quoted at 60 
and 10 per cent, off list. 

Tinned Roofing Caps— This line is 
moving well. Price is 6c a lb. 

Screws— There is still a shortage in 
screws, as the manufacturers have been 
unable to catch up with the demand. An 



May 28, 1904 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



active trade is being done. We quote 
discounts as follows: Round head, 
bright, 82 1-2 per cent.; flat head, bright, 
87 1-2 per cent.; brass, round head, 75 
per cent.; brass, flat head, «S0 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — There is a good busi- 
ness being done. We qnote discounts 
as follows: Carriage bolts common, ($1) 
list 3-16 and 1-4 diameter, 60 per- 
cent. ; carriage bolts, common ($1) list, 
5-16 and 3-8 diameter, 55 and 5 per 
cent. ; carriage bolts, common ($1) list, 
7-16 diameter and up, 55 per cent. ; car- 
riage bolts, full square ($2.40) list, 60 
per cent.; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3) list, 60 per cent.; machine bolts, 
3-8 diameter and under, 60 per cent. ; 
machine bolts, 7-16 diameter and larger, 
55 and 5 per cent. ; plow bolts, 55 and 
5 per cent. ; blank bolts, 55 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 55 and 5 per cent.; 
sleigh shoe bolts, 70 per cent. ; coach 
screws, cone point, 70 per cent. ; nuts, 
square, all sizes 4c per lb off; nuts, 
hexagon, all sizes, 41-4c per lb off. 

Washers, 45 per cent. off. 

Cut Nails— A good demand this week, 
with no change in prices. We quote as 
before, $2.30 per keg, f. o. b. Mont- 
real, Hamilton, Toronto and St. John. 

Wire Nails— There is a big trade be- 
ing done and the manufacturers have 
caught up with the demand. We 
quote the following prices: $2.40 per 
keg carlots and $2.45 per keg 
in small lots f.o.b. Gananoque, 
Montreal, London, Hamilton, Toronto, 
Brantford and St. John. 

Boxwood Rules— There is no change. 
Discounts as before, 52 1-2 to 50 per 
cent, off list. 

Shot Guns— Shot guns are in fair de- 
mand . There is still a shortage in some 
numbers of single barreled. 

Cordage— The demand in this line 
is very good. We quote as follows: 
Pure manila, 15c; British pure manila, 
12 l-2c ; sisal, 12c ; double lathyarn, lie ; 
single lathyarn, 101-2c; Russian tarred 
spunyarn, 131-2c; jute rope, 3-8-in in 
diameter and upwards, 9c; cotton rope, 
21c; cotton twine, 24c for 3 and 4 ply. 
Cotton bedcord, 90c to $1.70, according 
to length. Sash cord 30 to 311 -2c; cot- 
ton candle wick, 22 to 24c. 

Roofing Pitch— A brisk trade. There 
is a decrease of 10c per cwt. reported 
this week. The price is now $1 per 
cwt . 

Building Paper— The trade is very 
brisk. We quote as follows: Tarred 
felt, $1.85 per 100 lbs; 2-ply ready roof- 
ing, 90c per roll; 3-ply, $1.15 pei roll; 
carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb; dry sheath- 
ing, 40c per roll; tar sheathing, 50c per 
roll; dry fibre, 55c per roll; tarred fibre, 
65c per roll O.K. and I.X.L., 70c per 
roll; heavy straw and sheathing, $35 
per ton; slaters' felt, 65c per roll. 

Firebricks — Large consignments have 
recently arrived. English are selling at 
$16 to $22 per 1,000, Scotch $17 to 
$22. 

Cement — There is a big demand, but 
the supply is ample as incoming steam- 
ers have brought in large quantities , 



Prices remain unchanged at former 
quotations. which are: Canadian 
cement, $1.90 to $2.25; English, $2.15 
to $2.25; Belgian, $1.70 to $1.95 per 
barrel, ex store, and American, $2.20 
to $2.40 ex-cars. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

Trade continues active in all lines of 
plumbing goods, and the supply houses 
apparently have all that they can at- 
tend to. Nominally prices are unchang- 
ed. Iron pipe is selling freely, but 
for good orders prices quoted below are 
not always maintained. The discount 
of 70 per cent, on nipples (1-2 inch to 
6 inch) noted last week was announced 
by the manufacturers, but some of the 
supply houses state that their discount 
is, as before, 67 1-2 per cent. The city 
trade in plumbing supplies is active, in 
spite of the strike. 

Lead Pipe — Business continues active, 
some large shipments having been 
made this week by boat . The 
price is 8c for composition, waste and 
aqueduct and 7c for ordinary. The dis- 
count is 35 per cent., f. o. b., Montreal, 
Toronto, St. John, N.B., and Halifax; 
f. o. b. London, 15c per 100 lbs. extra; 
f. o. b. Hamilton, 10c per 100 lbs. extra. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— There is a 
steady trade in this line of plumbing 
supplies, and the market is stronger 
and in more healthy condition now than 
it was some weeks ago. We again quote 
discounts as follows: Liffht soil 
pipe, 3 to 6 in. 50 and 10 per 
cent. ; medium and extra heavy soil 
pipe, 2 to 6-in. 60 per cent. ; extra 
heavy soil pipe, 8-in, 45 per cent. Light 
fittings, 2 to 6-in, 50 and 10 per cent. ; 
medium and extra heavy fittings, 2 to 
6-in, 60 and 5 per cent. ; extra heavy 
fittings 8-in, 45 per cent. 

Iron Pipe and Fittings— Business con- 
tinues active in iron pipe. For desirable 
orders for large quantities the prices be- 
low mmted might be shaded a little. As 
noted above, the increased discount on 
the larger size of nipples, noted in last 
issue, was announced bv the manufac- 
turers. Some of the supply houses state 
that they are still allowing the former 
discount of 67 1-2 per cent. We quote: 
Standard pipe, per 100 feet, in length 
under 19 feet-black, 1-8-in, $2.30; 1-4- 
in, $2.30; 3-8-in, $2.55; 1-2-in, $2.85; 
3-4-in, $3.65; 1-in, $5.20; 1 1-4-in, 
$7.35; 1 1-2-in, $8.95; 2-in, $12.55. 
Galvanized— 1-4-in, $3.20; 3-8-in, $3.45; 
1-2-in, $3.90; 3-4-in, $5; 1-in. $7.20; 
ll-4in, $10.05; 1 1-2-in, $12.20; 2-in, 
$16.85. In the above the discount on 
1-8, 1-4 and 3-8 in black and 1-4 and 
3-8 in galvanized is 121-2 per cent.; 
and on 1-2 to 2, inclusive, in black and 
galvanized is 15 per cent. Extra heavy 
pipe, plain ends, are quoted per 100 feet 
as follows: Black. 1-2-in, $4.20; 3-4-in, 
$5.25; 1-in, $7.55; 1 1-4-in, $10.55; 
1 1-2-in, $12.75; 2-in, $17.60. Galvan- 
ized— 1-2-in, $5.25; 3-4-in, $6.65; 1-in, 
$9.55; 1 1-4-in. $13.25; 1 1-2-in, $16; 
2-in, $21.90. 'The discount on all sizes 
of extra heavy pipe is 12-12 per cent. 
Coupling, 1-2 in. to 2 in., 55 per cent. 

31 



discount; nipples, 1-4 and 3-8 in., 65 per 
cent discount and t-2 in, to (i in. 70 
per cent, discount. 

Solder— We quote 18c for bar and 
18 l-2c for wire solder. 

METALS. 

In the pig iron and steel markets busi- 
ness is verv quiet this week. The out- 
look for the Canadian market would he 
sufficiently bright if it were not for the 
fear of a decline in the United Slates 
market. Advices from the United States 
tell of an exceedingly dull market, and 
(he effect is not reassuring in Canada. 
Buyers are inclined to waif the course 
of the market. Price changes in general 
metals are not numerous this week. 
Sheet zinc is advancing because of the 
small supplies on the local market. For 
small quantities the price now ranges 
from $6.75 to $7. Tinplates, Canada 
plates, black sheets, etc., are very firm. 
Tin and copper are lirmlv held at pres- 
ent ouofations, no change having been 
made. Lead is slightly .easier, with local 
prices unchanged. 

Business this week in general lines 
has been active, but it is not expected 
that the increased activity this month 
will be sufficient to compensate for the 
dull trade earlier in the season. 

Pig Iron — As noted above, buying at 
present is strictly restricted to current 
requirements, as the foundries seem to 
expect lower prices and the furnace men 
and importers are not disposed to make 
concessions. The dull United States 
market is adversely affecting Canadian 
business by causing a distrust in the fu- 
ture stability of the market. The Do- 
minion Iron and Steel Company advised 
us last week from Sydney (too late for 
publication) as follows: "The market 
for the past week has been on the dull 
side. Some of the small eastern fur- 
naces appear to be very anxious for 
orders. However, on the whole, prices 
are being fairly well maintained. The 
volume of new orders received during 
the past week has been small; however, 
customers are still urging delivery id' 
contracts made." In their renort this 
week this company state: "The past 
week in pig iron business has been very 
dull. However. some of the largest 
customers have placed orders for fair 
sized quantities, they evidently believing 
that prices will not go lower." We 
quote : 

"Disc," No. i $1750 delivered Montreal. 

"Dora.," No. 1 1350 

Usual difference in price for lower grades. 

Ferrona No. i $18 oo delivered Montreal. 

No. 2 17.50 " 

No. 3 16 50 " 

No. 4 16.00 

Londonderry. gi8. 50 lo 819.00 delivered Montreal. 

Summerlee 18.50 

Glengarnock . . . . 20.00 " 

Gartsherrie 19.25 " 

Carnbroe 18.50 " " 

Carron No. 1 19.00 

(pecial) 1750 

Ayresome No. 1 1750 " 

" No. 3 16.90 " 

Clarence No. 1 16.25 

" No. 3 16.00 " 

Bar Iron — Local prices are steady; and 
in spite of the weakness in United States 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



May 28. 1904 



markets are not expected to decline as 
they have been abnormally low for this 
market. Moreover, supplies in some sizes 
are reported to be none too readily ob- 
tainable. We quote: Merchants' bar. 
$1.75; horse shoe iron. $2; forged iron. 
$1 . 95 . 

Merchant Steel— Locally business is 
quiet . Prices continue as before. We 
quote: Sleighshoe, $1.90; tire, $1.95 to 
$2.10: spring, $2.75 to $2.95; toe 
calk, $2.55; machinery (iron finish), 
$2.45; square harrow, $2.45. 

Tool Steel— Trade is quiet. We 
auote: Black Diamond, 8c to He; 
Sanderson's, 8 to 9c. according to 
the grade; Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & Col- 
ver's, 10 to 20c; "Air Hardening," 65c 
per lb. ; Conqueror, 7 l-4c. 

Steel Billets — The Dominion Iron and 
Steel Company advise us as follows: 
"No orders of any importance have been 
booked for billets; customers are speci- 
fying freely on account of existing con- 
tracts. Buyers and sellers seem to be 
far apart at present, and it is difficult 
to name a price on billets. 

Black Sheets— Prices are being well 
maintained in sympathy with the in- 
creasing strength of primary markets. 
We quote.: 28-gauge, $2. .'55; 26-gauge, 
$2.30; 22 to 24-gauge, $2.25; 19 to 20- 
gauge $2.20; 8 to 10-gauge, $2.35. 

Galvanized Iron— There is an active 
business this week in galvanized iron. 
We quote: 28-gauge, Queen's Head, 
$4.30: Gorbal's ~ "Best Best," 

$4:30; Apollo, 10 3-4 oz., $4.30; Fleur- 
de-Lis, $4; Comet, $4; Bell brand, $4. 
In less than case lots 25c extra. 

Canada Plates— Import business is 
opening up well. Prices quoted are 
well maintained. We quote: 52s $2.30; 
(ills. $2.35; 75s, $2.40; full polished. 
$3.60 and galvanized $4 to $4.10; gal- 
vanized 00s. $4.25 to $4.35. 

Sheet Zinc— Prices have been ad- 
vanced again. The average price for 
cask lots is about $6.50 and for smaller 
quantities the price ranges from $6.75 
to $7. Supplies arc short. 

Zinc Spelter— Quoted at 6c. 

Tinplates— Import prices are very 
firm. Cokes $3.75 and charcoals $4. 

Terne Plates— We quote $6.75. 

Ingot Tin— The market is firm and 
steady. Former quotations still obtain, 
viz.. 31 1-2 to 32c. 

Ingot Copper— The market continues 
to show considerable strength, but local 
a notations are unchanged. We again 
quote 14c per lb. for quantities. 

Pig Lead — Conditions are much the 
same as last week. The market is not 
very strong, but no changes have been 
made. We quote $3.35 to $3.45. 

Antimony— Cookson 's is quoted aj 
7 3-4c to 8c! 

Coil Chain— Quotations are: No. 
6c, 10c; No. 5, 9c: No. 4, 8 l-2c; 
No 3 7c; 1-4-in. $6.10; 5-16- 
in, $4.70; 3-8-in. $4; 7-16-in, $3.80; 
1-2-in. $3.70; 9-16-in, $3.55; 5-8-in. 
$3.35; 3-4-in, $3.30; 7-8-in, $3.25; and 



1-in, $3.20 with 10c allowance on car- 
lots. 

Scrap Metals and Old Materials— We 
quote: Heavy copper and wire, 11 to 
11 l-2c per. lb ; light copper, 10 l-2c ; 
heavy red brass, 10 to 101-4c; heavy 
yellow brass, 81-2c; light brass, 51-2c; 
lead, 2 3-4c ; zinc, 2 3-4 to 3c ; iron, No. 
1 wrought, $10 to $12; machinery scrap. 
$15 to $16: stove plate, $12; mixed 
country rags, 65 to 75c per 100 lbs; old 
rubbers, 51-2 to 6c per lb. 

HIDES. 

The demand has been good for hides, 
with no quotable change in prices. We 
quote : 

No. 1 beef hides 08 08i 

No. 2 " 07 07 

No. 3 " 06 06 

Lambskins 75 

No. 1 calfskins. . Oil 

ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street, East. 

Toronto, May 27, 1904. 

BUSINESS continues excellent in 
all seasonable lines. Retailers 
are doing an active trade, and 
while they are, generally speaking, only 
buying as their requirements demai d. 



large, a particularly good trade being 
done in such lines as hose, forks ami 
lakes, fence wire ami poultry nettin.v. 
screen doors and netting, wire nails, 
lawn mowers, garden hose, etc. Prices 
are steady throughout. In fact, such 
a stability is manifest in the market 
that in practically all lines retailers do 
not iiesitate to buy if they feel they can 
handle the goods. The demand, not 
the price, is the consideration at tin- 
moment . 

Washing Machines— There is a fan 
lv goted trade. Prices are stead'. 
The quotations now are : Round, react- 
ing washer, per doz., $56; square, re- 
acting washer, per doz., $59 ; Eclipse, 
$48; Dowswell. $36; New Century, $72. 

Oil Stove Wick — Prices are steady 
since the advance of about 10 vet cent. 
last week. 

Steel Track Door Hangers— We quote 
as follows: Steel track. 1x3-16 inches, 
$3.75; 1 1-4x3-10 inches, $4.75. At least 
one house is, however, quoting as low as 
$3.50 for 1-inch track hangers. 

Chain— Business of a sorting nature 
continues excellent. Prices are still as 
follows: 1-4-inch, $5.60; 5-16 iiu-h, $4.45; 
3-8-inch, $3.85; 7-16-inch, $3.70; 1-2-inch 
$3.55; 9-16-inch, $3.45; 5-8-inch, $3.35; 
3-4-inch, $3.25. 

Step Ladders— There is a good demand 
for pine ladders on this market at 10c 
per foot for 3 to 6 feet, and lie per foot 
for 7 to 10 feet ladders. 

Lawn Mowers — An excellent sorting. 
trade is reported. Prices are unchanged, 
as follows: Woodyatt, 10 1-2 inch 
wheel. $'8.60; Star. 9 inch, $7; 
Daisy. 8 inch. $5.75: t Philadelphia. 
71-2 inch, $7; Ontario' 71-2 inch, 
$15.80; King Edward. 12 inch. $9.50 
(14-inch cut in aboce). D. Maxwell & 

32 



Sons, 101-2 inch, $7.50 to $10; 9 inch, 
$5.50 to $6.25; 8 inch, $4.90 to $5.50. 
Discount 50 per cent. 

Screen Doors— A good trade is doing 
in this line. We quote as follows: Com- 
mon, two or three panel, walnut, 4 inch, 
$6.50; yellow and green stained, $6.75; 
in natural colors oil finish, $8.75, with 
20c less for 3-inch style. 

Screen Wire Cloth— Prices steady at 
$1.50 per 100 square feet. 

Spring Hinges— An improved trade is 
reported with prices steady as follows : 
No. 5, $17.25 per gross;' No. 10, $18 
per gross; No. 20, $10.50; No. 120. $20; 
No. 51, $9.25; No. 50, $27.50. 

Barb Wire— Activity continues. We 
quote as follows : $2.75 per 100 lbs, f .o.b. 
Toronto and $2.50 f.o.b. Cleveland. Car- 
lots of 15 tons, $2.40 f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Galvanized Wire— A sorting trade is 
doing, prices are firm as follows: No. 5, 
$3.65; Nos. 6. 7 and 8, $3.10; No. 

9, $2.45; No. 10, $3.15; No. 11, $3.20" 
No. 12, $2.60; No. 13, $2.70; No. 14. 
$3.70. In carlots f.o.b. Cleveland, No. 
5, $2.15; Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9, $2.10; No. 

10, $2.15; No. 11, $2.20; No. 12, $2.25; 
No. 13, $2.35; No. 14, $2.45. In less 
than carlots, 12 l-2c per 100 lbs extra 
charged . 

Coiled Spring Wire — Business con- 
tinues fairly good at steady prices. 
Our quotations are as follows: 
No. 9, $2.70 per 100 lbs, freights equal- 
ized with factory points at Montreal. 
Hamilton, London, Welland or Walker- 
ville and allowance to other points up 
to 25c; carlots, $2.65, freight allowance 
to 20c. 

Wire Nails— Business is active. Not- 
withstanding the lower quotations in 
the United States there is no change 
here at the moment. Quotations arc: 
$2.45 per ken f.o.b. Toronto, with carlots 
$2.40. 

Cut Nails— A moderate trade doing, 
with prices steady at $2.30 per keg f.o.b. 
Toronto and Hamilton. 

Horseshoes— There is not much activ- 
ity. Prices keep steady, how- 
ever, as follows : Tron shoes. 
light and medium pattern. No. 2 
and larger, $3.80; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.05 ; snow No. 2, and larger, $4.05 ; No. 
1 and smaller, $4.30; light steel shoes. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.95; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.20; featherweight, all sizes. 
to 4, $5.50; toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 
4, $6.75. If shipped from factory 15c 
less. 

Horsenails — Business is less active. 
Prices are unchanged. We still quote 
discounts as follows: "C" brand, 40, 
10 and 7 1-2 per cent.; other brands 55 
and 57 1-2 per cent. 

Screws — An active demand continues. 
Prices are unchanged . We quote : 
Flat head bright, 87 1-2 per cent, 
discount ; round head bright, 82 1-2 per 
cent. ; flat head brass, 80 per cent. ; 
round head brass, 75 per cent . ; round 
head bronze, 70 per cent. ; flat head 
bronze, 75 per cent. 



May 28, 1904 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers ol 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels, Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
isr quired : Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



a 



n 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land " will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writs for Pries to Sales Agents 

Orummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE 



or to 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 



MIDLAND. ONT 



Limited 



We invite inquiries for 

Steel Rails 



BAR IRON, PIG IRON GALVANIZED IRON, 
CANADA PLATES, TINPLATES, WIRE ROPE 
(W. B. BROWN & CO.), CEMENT, FIRE BRICKS 
ORE BAGS, GRAIN BAGS, ETC. 



C.F. JACKSON & CO., Limited 

Importers and Commission Merchants 

151 Hastings St. W.. VANCOUVER. B.C.. 
and LIVERPOOL. ENGLAND. 



Rivets and Burrs— Business keeps 
active in all sizes. Prices are firm. We 
quote as follows: Iron rivets, 60 and 10 
per cent, discounts; iron burrs, 55 per 
cent. ; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 45 per cent . 

Bolts and Nuts— A good trade con- 
tinues, manufacturers still reporting dif- 
ficulty in supplying lines. We still 
quote: Carriage bolts, common ($1 list), 
3-16 and 1-4-inch, 60 per cent. ; 
5-16 and 3-8-inch, 55 and 5 per cent. ; 
7-16 and up, 55 per cent . ; carriage bolts, 
full square ($2.40 list), 60 per cent.; 
carriage bolts, Norway iron ($3 list), 
60 per cent. ; machine bolts, 3-8 and less, 
60 per cent. ; 7-16 and up, 55 and 5 per 
cent.; coach screws, cone points, 66 2-3 
and 10 per cent. 

Cordage— There is a fairly good de- 
mand for binder twine. Deliveries of 
orders placed early in the season are 
active. The quotations on binder 
twine for the season of 1904 are as fol- 
lows: Sisal, 10 l-4c; standard, 10 l-4c; 
standard Manila (550 ft.), 11 l-4c; Man- 
ila (600 ft.), 12 l-4c; pure Manila (650 
ft.), 13 l-4e. Five-ton lots l-8c less. 
Carload lots l-4c less Prices on other 
lines are unchanged as follows: Pure 
manila, 15c; British pure manila, 
121-2c; sisal, 12c; double lathyarn, lie: 
single lathyarn, 10 l-2c ; double shingle- 
yarn, lie; single shingleyarn, 101-2c; 
sashcord 'Hercules.' 32 to 35c; 'Star,' 
36 to 38c; cotton rope, 3-16-inch and up, 
201-2 to 22c; 5 32-inch, 25 to 27c; 1-8- 
inch, 25 to 28c; cotton twine, 3-ply 25 
to 28c; 4-ply 32 to 34c; calking cotton, 
161-2 to 17c; cotton waste, colored. 
6 3-4c; white, 11 to 13c. 

Cement— Trade is moving sharply, 
and prices are firm. No changes are 
recorded on last week's prices. We 
quote : Canadian Portland, $1.90 to 
$2.25; American Portland, $2 to $2.10 
f.o.b. Toronto. 

Firebrick— Firebricks are in good de- 
mand at the following prices: English 
and Scotch at 28 to 35c. 

Building Paper— There is a good de- 
mand for building paper, with no 
change in prices. We quote: Tar- 
red felt, $1.85 per 100 lbs; 
2-ply ready roofing, 90c per roll; 3-ply. 
$1.15 per' roll; carpet felt, $2.25 per 
100 lb; dry seathing, 40c per roll; tar 
sheathing, 50c per roll; dry fibre, 55c 
per roll; tarred fibre, 65c per roll; O.K. 
and I.X.L., 70c per roll; heavy straw 
and sheathing, $35 per ton; slaters' felt, 
60c per roll. 

METALS. 

A reduction of 50c in the United 
States pig iron market, coming after 
several weeks of uneasiness, has caused 
a general expectation of lower prices 
on this market. While quotations are 
nominally unchanged, it is quite prob- 
able that a material reduction will be 
made in the Canadian market within a 
few days. In pig tin and ingot copper 
juices are slightly lower in Great Bri 
tain, but no changes have been made 
on this market . In sheet metals prices 
33 



IRON 
STEEL 

and 

METALS 

Close prices to wholesale buyers only. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Merchants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



A Good Iron Pump like the 

McDOUCALLSTANDlRD 

will outwear several wooden pumps. 
That's why we ask you to sell our Stan- 
dard. They satisfy your customer, and 
you know a satisfied customer can do 
your store an awful lot of good. 



McDougall Pumps 
—Made in Canada 

Send for Catalogue aid Prices 
The 

B. McDougallCo. 
Limited 

Gait, Ont. 




<( 



» 



ALPHA 

HIGH SPEED STEEL 

Crucible Cast Steel 

for Tools of all kinds. 

"B.C." Miners' Drill Steel 

B. K. MORTON & CO. 

SHEFFIELD, ENG. 

Agents for British Columbia : 

E. G. PRIOR &C0., Limited, Victoria. 

Canadian Rep. 

D.W.CLARK, P.O. Box 520, Toronto 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., u m i,.d 

NEW GLASGOW, N.S. 

Manufacturers of « ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



May 28, 1904 



are firm throughout. There is gen- 
eral activity. 

Pig Iron — Buyers are now buying 
only from hand to mouth, as theie is 
every indication of lower prices. Prices 
have been easy for some time, so that 
the reduction of 50c in U. S. iron re- 
ported this week makes lower prices on 
the Canadian market a probability. At 
the moment prices are still nominally 
as follows: 

Middlesboro, f.o.h., Toronto $19 25 

Hamilton, No. 1 " $18 50 to 19 00 

No 2 " 18 00 to 18 50 

Midland, No. 1 " 18 50 to 19 U0 

No. 2 " 18 00 to 18 50 

No. 1 f.o.h. Midland 17 00 to 17 50 

Radnor, f.o.b. furnaces 30 00 

Londonderry, f.o.h. furnaces 17 50 to 18 00 

Bar Iron— There is still a good busi- 
ness doing'. Prices are fairly steady, 
though competition for orders is 
keen. We quote $1.75 f. o. b. 
Toronto, with discount of 2 per cent. For 
extras as cut to length while rolling, 
polished, $2.60; and all-bright, $3.50. 

Tin — There is still a good trade do- 
ing. As stocks are light, prices arc 
firm hut unchanged at 30 to 30 1-2". 

Galvanized Sheets — There is a good 
demand at unchanged prices. Quotations 
are as follows: Queen's Head, $4.25 for 
28 gauee ; American, $4 for 28 gauge ; 
Bell brand, $4.25 for 28 gnage; Gordon 
Crown, $4.25 for 28 gauge. 

Tinplates— Considerable business has 
been done. Stocks are light. We quote : 
Coke plates, bright, 14x20, $3.10; 
charcoal plates, $4.25. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

Activity continues in practically all 
lines. In iron pipe and fittings the com- 
petition for business continues keen and 
prices are still being' cut bv some 
houses. There is an excellent trade in 
brass goods, prices of which are firm. 
In enameled ware lines there is consid 
erable competition by United States 
houses, but the sale of Canadian-mai.e 
baths and basins continues large. 

Lead Pipe— Prices are unchanged. 
We quote : Lead, 7c ; lead waste pipe, 8c ; 
discount 35 per cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Prices remain 
unchanged, while there is a good amount 
of trade being done. We quote : Medi- 
um and extra heavy pipe and fittings, 
60 per cent.; 7 and 8-inch pipe 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings- A brisk trade is 
being done, with considerable price- 
cutting. We quote nominally: Mnlleable 
fittings, 20 per cent. ; cast iron (stand- 
ard), 571-2 per cent.; headers, 521-2 
per cent. ; flanged unions, 60 per cent.; 
malleable bushings and plugs, 57 1-2 per 
cent.; nipples up to 6-inch inclusive, 
67 1-2 per cent. 

Copper Range Boilers— A fair, steady 
trade is being done since the new prices 
were issued. Discounts at 15 per cent. 
continue. 

Iron Pipe— Prices are being cut by 
dealers, and a considerable amount 
of business is being clone. We 
onote nominally f. o. b. Toronto: 
Black pipe, 1-8-inch, $3.05; 1-4-inch, 



IKE BANNER 

COLD BLAST 



LANTERN 



Always Leads. 
Great Light. 
Wind Proof. 



— NOTE IMPROVEMENTS FOR SEASON 1904, ■ 

We make twelve different Styles of Lanterns in Tin, Antique Copper and Solid Brass. 

STANDARD LIGHT PRODUCERS. 

FOR SALE BY ALL PROMINENT JOBBERS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. 



ONTARIO LANTERN & L_AIVIF> CO., limited 



WALTER GROSE, Selling* Agent, 



MONTREAL 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers ol 
Set and Cap Screws, Special Hilled Work, Engine Studs. 
Etc Cold Punched Nuti of every variety of finish 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



DOIT 

NOW 



MANUFACTURERS WISHING TO BE 
REPRESENTED IN 

MANITOBA 



COMMUNICATE WITH 



DAVID PHILIP, Manufacturers' Agent 



References Furnished. 



470 Main St., Baker Block, WINNIPEC, MAN. 



rnsassm 




Mechanically "Winds Any 
. . . Size Spring . . . 



The only hand spring winder made that will do so 
accurately. 

Can be used in vise or lathe and will wind any size 
spring any desired length. 

Write for Supplement " A " of the Green Book of Hardware Specialties for 

description and price. 

Smith, Hemenway & Co., Utlca Drop Forge & Tool Co. 

Mfrs. of Cutlery and Hardware Specialties. Mire, of Nippers and Flyers 

296 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, NEW YORK. 
Canadian Sample Room: 215 Coristine Bldg., Montreal, ALLEN C. JENKING, Canadian Manager. 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS Stamtt , & "*** F , , 

■ 43 and 44 Percival Street, • London, England 

Contractors to H. M. Government and the Principal English Sheet and Plate Glass Works. 
A]S0 Established 1815 

Lead Vices, 
Carbon Tools, 
Etc , Etc., 

Agents for Canada: ^ RaHlSay & SOIl, MOIltreal 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 




Our diamonds were first on the market and still r«main first with up-to-date improvements. We claim 
for them Superiority over All Others in Quality and Workmanship. 

Glaziers' Diamonds of every description, for all purposes, supplied. Established 1815 

CANADIAN AGENT ^. Shd YV & SOIl 

GODFREY S. PELTON «»..*■ „«!«».. C* P C I nn A« n 

33a st. Paul St., - Montreal 32 Habere St., E.C., London 

34 



May 28, 1904 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



$2.07; 3-8-inch, $2.25; 1-2-inch, 
$2.50; 3-4-inch, $3.22; 1-inch, $4.58; 
11-4-inch, $6.47; 11-2-inch, $7.85; 2- 
inch, $11.05; 21-2-inch, $19.25; 3-inch, 
$22.75; 31-2-inch, $28.75; 4-inch, 
$35.25. Galvanized pipe, 1-4-inch, 
$2.88; 3-8-inch, $3.11; 1-2-inch, $3.42; 
3-4-inch, $4.40; 1-inch, $6.35; 1 1-4-inch, 
$8.80; 11-2-inch, $10.75; 2-inch, $14.80. 

Enameled Ware— Competition is still 
keen and prices are still low, especially 
for "B" quality. We quote: "Stand- 
ard" 5 1-2 feet rolled rim, first quality, 
at $21.60; second quality, $15.50 to 
$16. . J«! 

Copper— A fair trade is reported in 
ingot, also an excellent movement in 
sheet copper. We quote: Ingot cop- 
per, $13.75, and sheet copper, $20 per 
100 lbs. 

Brass— There is a fair trade, with the 
discount steady at 15 per cent. 

Lead— There is a good demand at un- 
changed prices. We quote $3.30 per 100 
lbs. for pig lead and $3.65 for bar lead. 

Zinc Spelter— Stocks are light. Buy- 
ing is active at 6 to 6 l-2c per lb. 

Solder— There is a fair trade. Prices 
are l-2e lower. We quote : Guaranteed 
half-and-half at 17 1-2 to 18c, and wip- 
ing 16 1-2 to 17e. 

Antimony— 8c per lb. 

Old Material— The market still con- 
tinues to be quiet, with no change in 
prices . We quote : Heavy copper and 
wire, 10 l-4e per pound; light cop- 
per, 9 l-4c per pound ; heavy red 
brass, 9 l-4c per lb ; heavy yellow brass. 
8 to 9c per lb; light brass, 5 to 5 l-2c 
per lb ; lead, $2.50 per cwt ; scrap zinc, 
3c per lb; iron, No. 1 wrought, $10; No. 
2 wrought, $3 ; machinery cast scran, 
$13; stoveplate, $10; malleable and steel, 
$4; old rubbers, 5c per lb; country mix- 
ed rags, 65c per 100 lbs. 

PETROLEUM. 

The market is steady, with prices un- 
changed, as follows : Canadian prime 
white, 18 l-2c: Canadian water white, 
20c; American prime white, 19c; Ameri- 
can water white, 21 l-2c, ex-warehouse. 

COAL. 

There is an excellent trade doing. 
Prices are firm throughout . We quote : 
Anthracite, $5.25; bituminous for steam 
purposes, $2 to $4, according to qual- 
ity, f.o.b. Buffalo and bridges. 

Hides, Skins and Wool. 

Considerable activity is being exhib- 
ited in the market and prices are firm. 
A slight advance of l-2c per lb. in un- 
washed wool and another of l-4c per 
lb. pulled wools, super, are the only 
quotable changes this week. Prices are 
as follows: 

HIDES. 

No. 1 green, per lb 08 

" 2 " " 07 

" 1 " steers, per lb 084 

2 074 

Cured, per lb 08J 



CALFSKINS. 

Veal skins, Ho. 1, 6 to i» id. inclusive OH 

2 09 

1 15 to 20 lb " 10 

2 " " 08 

Deacons (dairies), each 65 

Sheepskins 1 00 1 25 

Lambskins ... 30 

WOOL. 

Unwashed wool, per lb 094 010J 

Fleece wool, new clip, per lb 16 

Pulled wools, super, per lb 18 20! 

" " extra " 20 22 



PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. A. H. Illsey, hardware and tin 
merchant, Picton, Out., is disposing of 
his business. 

Mrs. Jane Wood, wife of the late 
Hon. A. T. Wood, of Wood, Variance 
& Co., died at her home in Hamilton 
on Wednesday. 

Mr. Harry Ketf'er, clerk with the 
Manitoba Hardware and Lumber Co., 
Yirden, was drowed at Virden on Sat- 
urday. 

Mr. W. Thomson, editor of the Oil 
and Colorman's Journal, 19 Ludgate 
Hill, London, was a caller at the Mont- 
real office of Hardware and Metal this 
week. Mr. Thomson has made a tour 
of the United States and Canada, and 
speaks highly of Canada. 



SPRING CHICKEN WINDOW. 
DISPLAY. 

A suggestion for a unique show win- 
dow display of poultry netting and fenc- 
ing materials is made by H. A. Wood- 
ward, Franzen Bros., Riverside, Cal. 
The arrangement contemplates covering 
the floor of the window with clean sand. 
Rolls of wire netting and coils of smooth 
fence wire are arranged just inside and 
parallel with the glass, these extending 
from each end about one quarter of 
the length of the window. This leaves 
half of window front unincumbered. A 
keg of netting staples and one of fence 
staples, with the heads removed, are to 
be laid on their sides so that a portion 
of the contents will spill upon the sand. 
A fence is built across the length of the 
window, dividing' its depth into two 
equal parts. The fence is to be exceed- 
ingly primitive in its construction, com- 
posed of sundry and miscellaneous strips 
of boards and wood of various kinds 
and sizes, the object being to make the 
fence as crude and unattractive as pos- 
sible. On the fence are to be nailed 
signs of a character frequently seen 
along country roads, making them as 
pertinent and suggestive as possible. 
Some of these might read: "Buy your 

hardware at ," "Fair treat- 

35 




FIRE-PROOF 
GLASS WINDOWS. 

They give absolute security— resisting: 
intense fire heat, as well as the action of 
water. 

Arranged to open with this " fusible link" 
attachment, they close and lock automatic- 
ally if a fire occurs— 150° melts the link — 
thus giving complete and perfect protection. 

This "wired glass" admits the light as 
freely as plain glass— is rather ornamental 
in effect, and greatly lessens insurance 
rates. 

Full information if you write 

METALLIC ROOFING CO., 

Wholesale Mfrs. LIMITED, 

TORONTO, CANADA. 



ment at - -," "I trade at ," 

"Don't Swing on the gate," etc. Be- 
tween the fence and the back of the 
window are placed a hen and brood of 
little chickens, which are calculated to 
arrest the attention of passers-by. 



TRADE CONDITIONS IN BRITISH 
COLUMBIA. 

Special Correspondence of Hardware and Metal 

Vancouver, May 21, 1901. 

ON May 11 Japan's trade envoy 
arrived from the Orient on the 
C. P. R. steamer Empress of In- 
dia, lie is Mr. Issa Tanimura, Ph.D., 
LL.B., of Tokyo. Mr. Tanimura's 
especial mission in America at the pres- 
ent lime is to look into trade conditions 
in Canada, the United States, and 
Mexico. He has left for the latter re 
public and will make an extensive trip 
in pursuit of information. Later he 
will visit, the United States and Can- 
ada, and his findings will be reported on 
exhaustively to his government. 

Interviewed before he left the city, 
Mr. Tanimura said : "It has been the 
one great desire of Japan to open up 
trade with Canada. At present the 
greater part of our imports come from 
the United States. Of course, while the 
war is on we do not expect our trade to 
increase with any country, but I have 
strict orders to inquire into trade con- 
ditions in Canada and report on pros- 
pects when I return home." 

Mr. Tanimura will visit England and 
remain there several months after he 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



May 28, 1904 



has made a tour of this continent. He 
will come back via Montreal when he is 
returning to Japan, which will not be 
for a year or so. The Japanese trade 
commissioner is a highly educated gen- 
tleman, a graduate of Yale University. 
Though he has spent a good deal of time 
in the U. S., this is his first visit to 

Canada. 

» * • 

There arrived in the city a few days 
after the Japanese trade envoy reached 
here from Japan, the newly appointed 
trade commissioner from Canada to 
Japan, Mr. Alexander MacLean. He 
will be a passenger next Monday on the 
same steamer, the Empress of India, by 
which the Japanese commissioner ar- 
rived. Crossing each other as they do' 
in this rather coincident manner, the 
object of the two commissioners is al- 
most identical. Mr. MacLean is com- 
missioned to go to Japan and gather 
information on trade openings and op- 
portunities to extend our exports in 
the Mikado's domains. That object 
should be readily accomplished if, as 
Mr. Tanimura, the Japanese commis- 
sioner, says, the Japanese Government 
is sincere in its desire to build up a 
trade with Canada. 

Mr. MacLean is this week spendine his 
time to good advantage, meeting those 
business men of the citv who are anxi- 
ous to form connections in Japan, and 
also meetinc those who are posted on 
some of the conditions. He has an- 
nounced himself as. pleased to meet all 
who are interested in developing Can- 
adian trade in the Orient, and has been 
making the Board of Trade rooms his 
headquarters for certain hours to give 
the business public an opportunity to 
meet him. 

In this wav Mr. MacLean is gaining 
valuable insight into many matters per- 
taining to trade with Japan, and from 
the closer touch the merchants of Bri- 
tish Columbia are in with the trans- 
Pacific trade, he will be in a better 
position to advise after he has gained 
similar knowledge on the other side. 
The lumber industry has been very 
carefully explained to Mr. MacLean by a 
number of the manufacturers, and simi- 
larly the conditions of the salmon in- 
dustry have been laid before him in 
practical manner. The business public 
of British Columbia, more especially 
wholesale and manufacturing concerns, 
look with great expectation to a con- 
siderable advance in the trade which 
Canada has been doing with Japan. So 
far the war between Japan and Russia 
has had no apparent effect on what 
trade is being done. 



An indication of the keenness display- 
ed in getting hold of desirable land for 
farming or market gardening is found in 
the success which attended a sale of 
Government land in what is known as 
the Hastings Townsite, immediately 
adjoining the City of Vancouver on the 
eastern side. Yesterday the Provincial 
Government held an auction of the lands 
in this district, and nearly all was in 
acreage or "small holdings," as it is 
known. There were blocks of from 4 to 
20 acres in extent, and while some of it 
has heavy clearing to be done, nearly all 
can be said to be suitable for small 
ranches and market gardens, orchards, 
chicken ranches and the like. The bid- 



ding was very keen, and almost all the 
lots put up were disposed of, the buyers 
in most instances being actual settlers, 
men who intended making their homes 
on the lots they were buying. But few 
parcels were picked up by land specula- 
tors. The terms on which the land was 
sold was 25 per cent, cash and the bal- 
ance in three equal payments. 

The opening of this reserve to public 
purchase will have a good effect in pro- 
viding places for incoming settlers who 
may not wish or be equipped to make a 
living in a city. Hitherto many of the 
people who have come to British Colum- 
bia to locate have been handicapped by 
the fact that there was practically no 
choice for them in the way of occupa- 
tion. Many people have been getting on 
the land for the past two years, and the 
movement is very much more marked 
this year, but the strange part of the 
situation is that very few of the peo- 
ple really know how much land can be 
made fit for rural occupations. The 
area in the province, even in the lower 
mainland, which has always been looked 
to as a farming section, is much greater 
than most people imagine. Many of the 
sturdy pioneers who built up and clear- 
ed eastern Canada would find places 
here where their descendants do not 
dream of looking. When the residents 
of British Columbia realize how much 
land they have to offer for settlers de- 
siring rural occupation, and take hold of 
the matter in systematic fashion, the 
question of population to produce what 
the home market requires will be solved. 



The vicissitudes of steamboating on 
1he Yukon River were exemplified by the 
fate of the steamer Leah, which sank at 
Cliff Creek near Dawson, on May 17. 
She had successfully avoided the ice 
jam when the river broke up, and was 
riding on a big floe. When that broke 
up and she was sliding safely into the 
water, a big jack-screw fell from the 
upper deck of the river boat and, strik- 
ing the thin hull, dropped clear through 
the bottom. The vessel, of course, sank 
and an expensive job of raising her lies 
before her owners. Her value is $80,- 
000. 

• • • 

Oil in the Alaskan District has long 
been acknowledged by experts to exist. 
In fact considerable exploratory work- 
has been carried on at one time and an- 
other. The latest information is from 
White Horse, to the effect that Norman 
Macaulay, an old tinier of the Yukon 
District, is, with others, interested in 
a 900 acre tract of oil land on Chilkat 
Point, near Kayak Island. An English 
syndicate is located at one side of the 
Macaulay property, and Thos. Lippy, 
the Klondike millionaire, now resident 
in Seattle, has a large holding on the 
other side. The English syndicate has 
two drilling machines on its property 
and is driving holes. One hole has been 
sunk a depth of 600 feet, and is now 
yielding four barrels of oil per day. One 
hundred and fifty men are employed on 
the operations. 

* * * 

What are said to be the last two ships 
to load lumber at the Hastings mill, in 
this port, for some time, are soon ex- 
pected to arrive. They are the British 
ship County of Kinross, due any day, 
ha\ing sailed from San Francisco on 



the 6th inst., and the British barque 
Donna Francisca, 2,163 tons, which is 
now at San Francisco discharging car- 
go. The former loads for Calais and 
Havre, France, and the latter for Cal- 
lao, Peru. The cargo for these vessels 
is awaiting them, having been cut be- 
fore the mill closed down. 

* * * 

Mr. A. Haslam, whose large saw mill 
was burned at Nanaimo last week will 
immediately rebuild. As the dry-kilns 
and yards were saved from destruction 
and one of the big mill boilers is fit for 
use, it will not be long before the op- 
eration of the sash and door factory 
will begin. 

* ♦ * 

A notice in the Official Gazette re- 
serves certain lands belonging to the 
Crown, and hitherto unappropriated, for 
the purpose of enabling the Island Pow- 
er Co., Limited, to make a selection for 
the purpose of a pulp mill. This is in 
accordance with the Act to encourage 
the establishment of the pulp industry. 
The lands are reserved for two years 
under the Act. The company has had 
some of the reserves marked on the 
mainland and on smaller islands of the 
coast waters as well as on Vancouver 
Island. 

« * * 

A party of McGill University students, 
under the guidance of Dr. A. W. J. Wil- 
son, of the Geological Department of 
the university, and Dr. J. B. Porter, 
professor of mining, assisted by Mr. J. 
F. Robertson, instructor in mining, are 
taking a five weeks' course of practical 
work in the Rossland mines. The party 
consists of 18 students, and they will 
also take some practical instruction at 
Lethbridge, the, Gait coal mines being 
there, and in Northwestern Ontario, or 
the Rat Portage District. 



The Western Canadian Can Fac- 
tory, of Cliff & Sons, at New West- 
minster, has been greatly enlarged re- 
cently. An addition 75x50 feet is being 
completed. The plant is very fully 
equipped now, and the process of turn- 
ing out cans for various industries is 
done with a minimum of labor. The 
sheet of tin is put in the first machine 
and goes through a succession of pro- 
cesses until the complete can is turned 
out at the other end of the factory. 
* * * 

A big syndicate of eastern capitalists 
and lumbermen have become incorporated 
as the Kamloops Lumber Company, 
Limited, completing a deal which was 
made some weeks ago for the purchase 
of a saw mill at Kamloops and valuable 
timber limits in the district. The prin- 
cipal parties interested are : Geo. Mc- 
Cormick, M. P., Orillia, lumber manu- 
facturer; Geo. W. Fowler, M. P., Sus- 
sex, N. B., barrister; Lt.-Col. John 
Irvine Davidson, Toronto, wholesale 
merchant; John Alex. McGillivray, 
Cxbridge; Hon. Geo. E. Foster, and 
Hon. Elliot Grasette Stevenson, of De- 
troit. The chief place of business of the 
newly incorporated company is Toronto. 



The boards of trade of some of the 
leading cities are arranging to send 
delegates to Ottawa to make represen- 
tations on behalf of the request of the 
lumbermen that a duty be imposed on 
lumber from the U. S., equal to that 



36 



May 28, 1904 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



imposed on Canadian lumber going into 
the republic. The idea emanated from 
the Victoria Board of Trade, and Van- 
couver and other cities are adopting it. 
A special collection is being made to 
defray the cost. The delegation will be 
accompanied by members of the Lumber 
Manufacturers' Association. 
» • • 

The Hastings Shingle Mfg. Co., oper- 
ating the largest shingle mill on the 
coast, intends rebuilding on the site of 
the large mill destroyed last year. While 
this decision was reached at a meeting 
of the company some months ago, ac- 
tive operations have been delayed. The 
mill destroyed had a daily capacity of 
50,000 feet of lumber and 200,000 
shingles. Mr. Jas. A. McNair, president 
of the company, said recently: "This 
capacity would have been doubled, per- 
haps trebled, had conditions in the in- 
dustry improved, and a tariff been im- 
posed as requested by the lumbermen of 
the province. Now, however, it is more 
likely that we will curtail the capacity 
when we commence rebuilding. The 
large shingle mill still operated by the 
company in Vancouver, has a capacity 
of 1,000,000 shingles per day, the larg- 
est shingle mill in the world, but is 
only worked for 400,000 shingles per 
day. 

"Loyalist as I am," said Mr. McNair 
recently, "unless the Dominion Govern- 
ment does something very soon to am- 
eliorate conditions, the people of Can- 
ada may have a rude awakening by the 
demands British Columbia might make 
for a separation." 

PITTSBURG METAL MARKET. 

From The Iron Trade Review, May 26, 1904. 

C^URT AILMENT of pig iron produc- 
y tion is the next move of import- 
ance in the iron trade. With an 
output at the opening of the month at 
the rate of more than 19 1-4 million 
tons a year, and an evident dwindling 
of demand, with most buyers only rive 
weeks from the end of present contracts, 
blowing out seems to be the natural re- 
course of a good many merchant stacks. 
Prices have declined further in the past 
week, and furnaces to which the present 
level means only getting back cost, find 
no good ground for piling iron. There 
is undeniably a great difference between 
the current movement of iron and steel 
products and that which is indicated 
for the third quarter by the orders al- 
ready entered for that period . Mills find 
their week-to-week shipments not mark- 
edly less than at this time last year, 
and if this condition and the strong 
points in the general situation in the 
west and the south, together with the 
recently improved crop prospects, were 
allowed to determine, there would be a 
brighter story to write of iron and steel. 
But willingness to buy lias largely de- 
parted, ami lor the present the trade 
accepts that as the controlling factor. 
The general expectation of lower prices, 
however well or ill founded, is sufficient 
to account for a lar - ge part, of this hesi- 
tation; the balance, as has been done for 
months, is assigned to the railroads, 
which prefer to let their needs accumu- 
late while rolling; stock and tracks wear 



out under a traffic but little under Hie 
maximum of recent years. 

Pig Iron— The sale of 500 tons of. No. 
2 foundry at $13 Pittsburg, establishes 
the low point on that grade for this 
year. Inouiries in the market at ores- 
ent for about 4,(100 tons of foree and 
foundry iron will no doubt result in the 
fixing of a slightly lower level 
than has heretofore existed. On 

foro'e iron the best that has 

been dene is $12.85 Pittsburg, on 1,500 
tons for delivery to July 1. Lower 
prices will be made, however, to take 
the business now offered. On Southern 
iron $9.50 is still being quoted at Bir- 
mingham for delivery to the middle of 
the year, and for third quarter deliv- 
ery $0.25. It is probable, however, 
that the latter price would be ouoted on 
a desirable order for June delivery. On 
forge iron $12.60 Pittsburg is being of- 
fered . There is no demand for Bessemer 
and there is no telling what prices 
might be named on a good order. While 
the asking pi-ices are $12.50 at the fur- 
nace, it is believed $13 Pittsburg could 
be done. We quote as follows: 

Bessemer, Valley $12 40 to $12 50 

Bessemer, Pittsburg 13 25 to 13 35 

No. 1 Foundry 13 60 to 13 75 

No. 2 Foundry 13 00 to 13 35 

Gray torge, Pittsburg 12 75 to 12 85 

Chilled basic, Valley 12 15 to 12 25 

Chilled basic, Pittsburg 13 00 to 13 10 

Steel — While consumers are specify- 
ing freely on existing contracts, little 
new business is being 1 placed. Associa- 
tion mills are still holding to agreed quo- 
tations, but Bessemer and open-hearth 
billets are being freely offered at $22 
Pittsburg, and these prices could be 
shaded 011 a fair tonnage. 

Bars — Eastern bar iron manufactur- 
ers last week reaffirmed quotations on 
bars which are 1.35c Pittsburg and 
1.49 l-2c delivered New York. The 
new tonnage in both iron and steel bars 
continues light, and iron prices con- 
tinue to be shaded. We make the fol- 
lowing quotations: Bar iron, 1.35c to 
1.40c Pittsburg, for local delivery, while 
for western shipment quotations are 
based on 1.25c to 1.30c Pittsburg. 

Structural Material— The contract foi 
the structural material for the elevated 
tracks of the Wabash on the South Side 
has not yet been placed. Heyl & Pat- 
terson this week received a contract for 
the erection of a coal washery from the 
Dominion Iron & Steel Co., which will 
require 3,500 tons of steel. Quotations 
remain unehansred as follows: Beams and 
channels, 3 to 15 inches, 1.60c; IS to 
24 inches. 1.70c; tees, 1.65c; zees. 
1 .60c; angles, from 3 to 10 inches, 1.60c; 
universal mill plates, 1.60c. 

Pipes and Tubes— Demand for line 
pipe and oil country goods is better than 
ever before in the history of the pipe 
trade. The development of the Kan- 
sas and Texas fields and the heavy re- 
quirements of line pipe have thrown a 
tremendous tonnage to the pine mills 
The demand for boiler tubes, however, 
is only fair, while on merchant nine 
there is considerable cutting. Conces- 
sions of 10 per cent, from existing dis- 

37 



counts have been reported, although tin 
largest producer is adhering to former 
prices on this material . 

Wire and Wire Nails— Concessions of 
2 l-2c per 100 lbs. are being made on 
wire and wire nails to distant points. 
The largest producer is still adhering 
to list quotations, but practically all of 
the independents are making these con- 
cessions. No change has been made in 
the ruling prices on_cut nails. We make 
the following ([notations: Wire nails, 
carload lots to jobbers, f.o.b. cars 
Pittsburg, are quoted $1.90 base; plain 
wire, carload lots, $1.80 base; barb 
wire, carload lots, $2.20 base; staples, 
carload lots, $2.05 keg. Galvanized, 30c 
extra. Carload lots to retailers are held 
at 5c advance in all lines, and on less 
than carload lots a further advance of 
10c is charged. Steel and iron cut 
nails, carload lots, $1.75, and less than 
carload lots. $1.80 f.o.b. Pittsburg, 
plus freight to points of destination. 
Terms, 60 days, less 2 per cent, off in 10 
days. 

Coke — Lower nrices are being named 
bv some Connellsville producers of 
foundry poke, as low as $1.90 having 
been done to consumers this week. To 
dealers one large producer is quoting 
$1.85, and the prevailing prices to con- 
sumers range from $1.95 to $2. A few 
operators for special grades of coke, 
however, continue to secure somewha; 
higher prices. On furnace coke $1.50 
to $1.60 is being done. The output ot 
the Connellsville region still continues 
heavy, and not many ovens are shutting 
down, despite the low prices that are 
ruling. For the week ending Saturdav, 
May 14. the production of the up' ■" 
region reached 209,147 tons. 18,545 out 
of a total of 23,041 ovens being in opera- 
tion. The production of the lower re- 
gion was 55,898 tons and 4,684 out of a 
total of 5j645 ovens were in operation. 

LONDON METAL MARKET. 

From The Metal Market Report May 25. 

Pig Iron— Scotch warrants, Glasgow, 
closed at 51s 9d, a decline of 3d. Mid- 
dlesboro No. 3 foundry at 43s 7 l-2d, 
an advance of 1 l-2d. 

Tin— Spot tin opened easy a I £124 
5s, futures £123 15s, and after sales of 
270 tons of spot and 210 tons of futures 
closed easy at £124 2s 6d for spot an t 
£123 12s 6d for futures, making prices 
as compared with last week £1 9s fd 
lower on spot and £1 10s lower on fu- 
tures. 

Copper — Spot copper opened easy al 
£56 12s 6d, futures £56 13s 9d, and after 
sales of 25 tons of spot and .'15(1 tons 
of futures, closed easy at £56 7s lid for 
spot and £56 10s for futures, making 
price as compared with lasl week 7s 
lower on spot and £1 12s lower on fu- 
tures. 

Lead— The market closed al £11 13s 
9d, making price as compared with a 
week ago 2s Od lower. 

Spelter— The market closed at £22, 
makin? price as compared with last 
week 2s fid lower. 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKE'ls, 



May 28, 1904 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEnENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading. 2c. a word first 
insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no case can this rule be overlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. s 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



A GOOD HARDWARE STORE and tinware 
business, with tinshop, in a progressive town, 
about 1,000 population; stock between $4,000 and 
8=;, 000; good reason for selling. Address, Box 136, 
Hardware and Metal. (24) 



HARDWARE and tinware business for sale, in 
one of the best business towns in Ontario; 
stock about $1,200; rent low and dwelling in con- 
nection; business capable of expansion; good 
opening for a practical tinsmith and hardware- 
man. For full particulars address Box 133, 
Hardware and Metal. (22) 



HARDWARE BUSINESS— About $4,000. in 
largest mining town in New Ontario. For 
particulars address Home & Hardy, Copper 
Cliff. (24) 



HARDWARE STORE and tinsmithing business 
—About $2,000. in town of Frankford. For 
particulars address John Lewis & Co., Belleville, 
Ont. (22) 



MACHINE SHOP TO LET— In the centre of 
Ottawa; modern tools,; well equipped; good 
trade; established fifteen vears. Particulars, ad- 
dress 367 Besserer street, Ottawa. Ont. (f) 



TO SELL OR RENT— Cheap pump shop and 
tools; with or without engine; opposition 
twelve miles. J. R. Williams, Gorrie, Ont. (f) 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



CIRST-CLASS PLUMBER— Also first-class 
» tinsmith — at once; state experience and wages. 
T. J. Campbell; plumber, Midland. (f) 



GENERAL BLACKSMITH— First-cla<s shoer; 
steady job; state wages. Box 219, Thames- 
ville. (f) 



GAUGE LATHE HAND-At once; must be 
good man; state wages and experience. 
Coombe & Watson, Kincardine. (f) 



MARBLE CUTTER — Good letterer — On 
granite and marble; steady work and good 
wages to right man. ]. Perrott, Alliston Marble 
Works. (f) 



IV/l ECHANICS— Two first-class brass finishers, 
I *' Monitor lathe hand, and improvers to b ass 
finishing. Wilson and Cousins, 16 Sheppard 
treet, Toronto. (f) 



HARDWARE CONDITIONS IN MANITOBA. 



T 



HE trade si 1 nation throughout the 
country is much improved and 
business in now resuming a more 
normal condition. The general appear- 
ance of business in the city is quite sat- 
isfactory. The market practically re- 
mains the same with little or no 
chasge of any account. We quote : 



Barbed wire, 100 lb 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 

9 

Plain galvanized 10 

" 13 

••••> *3 



14 

15 

16 

Plain twist 

Staples 

Oiled annealed wire 10 



Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 
Horsenails, 40 per cent. discount. 
Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 . . . 



.13 

• 13 
.14 

• IS 



No. 3 and larger 
Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 . . 

No. 3 and larger . 
Steel, No. o to No. 1 

No. 3 and larger. 



Cut Nails— 

sd 1 in $4 10 

3d Fin. 1% in.. 4 10 

3d iK in 3 7S 

4d 1 H in 3 50 

Sd iK in 3 S° 

6d 3 in 3 40 

8d 2% in 3 35 

iod 3 in 3 so 

30d 4 in 3 15 

3od 4& in 3 10 

40d S in 3 10 

Sod 5% in , 3 10 

6od 6 in 3 10 



Wire Nails — 



1 in... 
i'A in. 
iK " 
iS " 
iK " 
3 " 
2% " 
3 " 
3* " 
4 
4* " 

5 " 
5* " 

6 " 



Bar iron (basis ) 

Swedish iron (basis) 

Sleigh shoe steel 

Spring steel 

Machinery steel 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, 100 lb . 
Jessop 



Sheet iron, black, 10 to 16 gauge, 100 lb. 

18 to ss gauge 

24 gauge 

26 gauge 

gauge 

Galvanized Iron, Apollo, 16 gauge .... 

18 and 20 gauge 

22 and 34 gauge 

36 gauge English or 28 American . . 

38 gauge 

30 gauge or 10 Ji oz 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 
of 2=; p.c. per 100 lb. 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 

26 gauge 

28 " 

Extra sheets, 36-in. wide, an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 



$3 IS 
3 39 
3 50 

3 5° 
3 10 

3 20 

3 

4 
4 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



U 75 



45 
60 

45 
45 
20 



15 
10 

70 
5° 
5° 
40 

25 
20 

15 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



3 SO 

4 75 
a 8S 
3 SS 
3 5° 
8 so 

13 00 

3 So 
3 75 

3 90 

4 00 
4 10 



4 25 
4 50 
4 75 



Genuine Russian , per lb 

Imitation " " 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 
36 gauge 



Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 

IX 

IXX 
Ingot tin 



11 

07 to 08 
8 00 

8 50 

9 50 
11 50 
13 50 

35 



Offlc* of Hardware and Metal 

Room 308 Mclntyre Block, 

Winnipeg, May 25, 1904. 

Canada plate, 18 x si, 18 x 34 and 20 x 28. 

Canada plate, full polished 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 

Broken lots 

Pig lead, 100 lb 

Black iron pipe, y% inch 

X " 

# " 

« " 



3 00 


3 IS 


7 00 


7 So 


S So 


3 30 


3 30 


3 40 


3 75 


4 30 


6 25 


« 75 


10 so 


14 50 


11 75 


15 25 


11 25 


30 



Black iron pipe, Ji inch 

" 1 " 

i* " 

1% " 

" 3 " 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 

Lath varn 

Solder 

Axes, chopping f 6 75 to 13 00 

" double bitts is 00 to 18 00 

Bluestone 5 25 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 80 p.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coach 70 p.c. 

Bolts, carriage, 3-16 and & 60 p.c. 

S-16 and yi 55 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and up 55 p.c. 

Bolts, machine, yi and under 50 and 5 p.c. 

" 7-i6andover ssandsp.c. 

Bolts, tire 60 and 5 p.c. 

Bolt ends 55 and S p.c. 

Sleigh shoetolts 70 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts 55 and 5 p.c. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

" " small lots 2%c. 

Hex " case lots 3c. 

" " smaller lots sXc 

Rivets, iron 50 and 10 p.c. 

Copper, No. 8 32 

" No. 13 36 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch 9H 

M, inch 7H 

" s-16 inch $yi 

H inch SH 

" 7-16 inch 4# 

" X inch 4H 

" >■ and % inch 4 

Spades and shovels 40 and 5 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 p.c. 



Axe handles, turned, s. g. hickory, doz. 

No. 1 

No. s 

Octagon extra 

No. 1. 



$3 « 

1 90 
1 60 
s 30 
1 60 

Files common 70 and 10 p.c. 

Diamond 60 p.c. 

Building paper : 

Anchor, plain 65c. 

" tarred 70c. 

Pure fibre, plain 67^0. 

" " tarred 80c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion, C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

" military.... 15 P-C- 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5P C - 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, is gauge black 

chilled, is gauge 

soft, 10 gauge 

chilled, 10 gauge 



15 00 
lb 00 

18 00 

19 00 

Shot , Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 00 

Chilled : 6 50 

Powder, F.F., keg 4 75 

F.F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

" " plain 75 and 2% p.c. 

" pieced 

Japanned ware 37# P- c - 

Enamelled ware, white 45 P-c 

" Famous 50 and 10 p.c. 

" Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

Green Wire Cloth 1 55 



38 



May 28, 1904 

PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 27 'Ac. 

Prime white American 25 &c. 

Water white Canadian ^s'Ac. 

Prime white Canadian 24^0. 

SCRAP. 

No. 1 cast iron $14 to J S 

No. 2 " 7 

Wrought iron scrap S 

Copper (heavy) 8Hc per lb. 

Yellow brass (heavy) 7J4c. 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 2c. to 2J4C ' 

Zinc scrap ic- 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

White lead £6 00 to $6 50 

Putty in bladder,2# lb., in keg of 100 lbs. o 02K 
Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ o 97 

Less than barrel lots 1 02 

Linseed oil, raw o 52 

Boiled o ss 

WINDOW GLASS. 

Single 1st break, up to 25 miled inches, $3.50; 26 
to 40, $3.75; 41 to 50, $4.25; 51 to 60, $4.75; 61 to 
70, 5S- 2 5, in 100-ft. boxes. 

Lubricating oils, heavy castor machine. ... o 29 

" extra engine 027 

" dynamo o 35 

" black o 22 

" cylinder $0 50 to o 75 

(as to quality) 

Harness oil o 50 to o 60 

Neatsfoot oil 1 00 

Vegetable oil, 1st pressure 1 00K 

" 2nd pressure 1 09 H 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



» 



A 



THE SHELLAC MARKETS. 

DVANCES in the shellac market 
since January 1 have broken all 
records. In some brands the ad- 
vance in lour months has been as great 
as in entire years previously, notably 
D. C, which was quoted at 70c in Janu- 
ary of this year and is now at 95c. 
'1 his is a clear advance of 25c per pound 
in four months. D. C. has been on the 
up grade for several years. In May, 
1901, it was quoted at 26c; in 1902, at 
37c; in 1903, at 48c, and now at 95c. 
Thus, while D. C. advanced lie from 
May, 1901, to May, 1902, and 
another lie from May, 1902, 

to May, 1903, it has during 
the past year advanced 47c, or just 
about doubled in price, and since last 
January its advance has been 25c per 
pound. Other grades of shellac have 
had a similar upward movement, but 
not so spectacular. These advances 
have been due to scarcity of supply, and 
the effect on the business is not alto- 
gether salutary. It has resulted in 
hand-to-mouth buying, for buyers will 
not stock heavily at what they fear is 
the top of the market. It has also re- 
sulted in a search for substitutes, the 
use of cheaper materials, and a renewed 
effort on the part of German chemists 
to produce a synthetic article which 
they hope will prove to be a successful 
substitute for shellac for ordinary uses. 
—Paint and Oil Review. 



"Matchless Treasure 

RANGE 

4=Hole Coal or 
Wood Range 




Sheet Steel Oven, Duplex Grate, 
Nickeled Steel Edges, "Never- Break" 
Steel Base. 

A splendid baker, moderate in 
price, and economical on the fuel. 



EVERY "MATCHLESS TREASURE" GUARANTEED. 

THE D. MOORE COMPANY, HAMILTON 

MANITOBA r>cp "' r , inn ■» 

MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., 

117 Bannatyne St. East, Winnipeg 




MANUFACTURED BY 

G. F. STEPHENS & CO., LIMITED 



WINNIPEG. CANADA. 



39 



Hardware and Metal 



May 28, 1904 




Substitutes for Turpentine 

ACCORDING to Utz, in the last 
issue of the "Chemische Revue 
uber die fett-und Harz-Indus- 
trie," there seems a possibility of a 
mixture of Russian and American tur- 
pentine being put on the market as pure- 
ly American, some recent shipments 
having exhibited a peculiar odor at- 
tributed to the presence of the former 
article— an assumption to which color is 
lent by the fact that considerable par- 
cels are being shipped from Russia to 
the States. 

Apart from this, Utz has recently ex- 
amined a number of samples of adulter- 
ated turpentine. One specimen of 
"white spirit" was found to be perfect- 
ly colorless, without the slightest trace 
of the characteristic violet-blue fluores- 
cence or levorotatory power, whilst the 
refractometer index marked 37.0 deg. of 
the Zeiss scale. Another turpentine 
substitute was also colorless, optically 



inactive, and, like the preceding one, had 
an odor of toluol, but a refractometer 
index of only 4.8 deg. A third sample 
differed in having a faint smell of tur- 
pentine, a slight dextro-rotation (0.20), 
sp. gr. 0.8,065 at 15 deg. C, and the 
refractometer index 33.0 deg. 

Various color-reaction tests were ap- 
plied, including that of Lyon (hydro- 
chloric and nitric acids), that of Cin- 
percesco for sesame oil and liver oil 
(nitric acid, sulphuric acid and water), 
bromine water, and iodine water, but 
though fairly definite results were ob- 
tained when working either with pure 
turpentine or the unmixed substitutes, 
it proved very difficult to detect the 
presence of petroleum distillates in ad- 
mixture with the turpentine, except per- 
haps in the case of iodine water. With 
this reagent the following results were 
obtained : With pure turpentine the two 
liquids take a long time to separate, 
the iodine water is colorless, and the 



turpentine orange colored. In the case 
of the turpentine substitutes, however, 
separation occurred very soon, and 
while the reagent remained colorless the 
oil turned raspberry red instead of red- 
dish yellow. With mixtures of turpen- 
tine and substitutes the colorations 
were intermediate between the two 
shades cited. By this test, performed 
in comparison with pure turpentine and 
the unmixed substitutes, the presence of 
adulterants can be detected; and should 
the refractometer index of the sample 
under examination fall below 1.4,680 at 
20 deg. C, it may be confidently as- 
sumed that the turpentine is adulterated 
with petroleum distillate. This con- 
firmatory test is the more reliable inas- 
much as, contrary to the previous hypo- 
thesis, the refractometer index of pure 
turpentine appears to undergo no change 
during storage — at least, within the first 
six months.— Oolorman's Journal. 



Memorial Windows 

UNEXCELLED 
DOMESTIC ART GLASS 

H. E. St, George, London, Ont. 




THE SPRAMOTOR 

is recognized by the users as the most durable and 
efficient apparatus yet invented, for the 

Prevention of blight and bugs on fruit and potatoes 

For the destruction of wild mustard in the grain 
crops without injury to the grain, and for 

The painting of buildings. 

Has been awarded First Place by the Canadian Gov 
erment in actual contest, and 

The Gold Medal at the Pan-Aniericau. 

The Trade fully protected. 

Write for particulars and discounts. Terms liberal. 

THE SPRAMOTOR CO., 



68-70 King St., 



LONDON, CA N 



"Ml** * 



*&*- 




You can get Paint at almost any 
price. This does not apply 
to Hollywood, as it is fixed 
in price as it is in quality. 

Being designed to give entire satisfaction to 
the most critical customer, it is as low in price as 
it is possible to get a thoroughly reliable article. 

Hollywood Paste, Ready=Mixed «* Floor Paints 

They wear on the job, not off it. 



The Imperial Varnish & Color Co, 



LIMITED, 



TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA. 



40 



May 28, 1904 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADBS 



Hardware and Metal 








Raw and Boiled 

"GUARANTEED PURE" 



MANUFACTURED BY 



Canada Linseed Oil Mills 



MONTREAL. 



LIMITED, 



sy BARRELS WANTED!! 

We are open to buy good, sound, oak 

Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Varnish, and 
Machine Oil Barrels. 



If You Buy 

Varnishes Paints 
Japans Colors 

Lacquers Glues 
Stains Bronzes 

Fillers Chamois 

Sponges 



WRITE TO 



LIMITED 



R.C.JAfllESON&CO. 
MONTREAL 

AGENTS FOR ASPINALL S ENAMEL. 



The Wisdom of 

Good Brushes 



'ai> 




IS WELL UNDERSTOOD BY 
THE PRACTICAL PAINTER 
AND EVERY DEALER. 



BOECKH'S 



STANDARD PAINT BRUSHES 



OPERATING: 

Boeckh's Toronto Factories 
Bryan's London Factories. 
Cane's Newmarket Factories. 



REQUISITE FOR HOUSE AND SIGN PAINTERS, VARNISHERS, 
KALSOMINERS, PAPER HANGERS, GRAINERS, ARTISTS, DEC- 
ORATORS, CARRIAGE AND COACH PAINTERS, are known from 
Halifax to Vancouver as the best money can buy. 

SOLD BY ALL RELIABLE DEALERS, THEREFORE YOU SHOULD SELL THEM. 
NONE GENUINE UNLESS BRANDED WITH THE NAME " BOECKH." 

UNITED FACTORIES, 

LiniTED. 



MONTREAL BRANCH : I and 3 DeBresoles St, 



Head Office: TORONTO, Ont. 

LONDON BRANCH: 71 Dundas St. 



41 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



May 28, 1904 



* 



Paint and Oil Markets 



t 



Quebec. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, May 28, 1904. 

ACTIVITY still characterizes the 
local paint and oil market, and 
although the holiday on Tuesday 
interfered somewhat with business, the 
volume of the week's sales is appar- 
ently quite up to the average. Linseed 
oil and turpentine are unchanged in 
prices, but the position of neither is 
regarded as particularly strong. The 
future seems uncertain. The English 
linseed oil market is weak, but prices 
here are so low now that they are 
scarcely likely to go lower. We quote: 

Ground White Lead— Best brands, 
Government standard, $4.50; No. 1 
$4.25 to $4.40; No. 2, $4 to $4.10; No. 
3, $3,671-2 to $3,771-2; No. 4, $3.30 
to $3.40, all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead— $4 in casks and in 
kegs $4.25. 

Dry White Zinc— Pure dry, in casks, 
6e; in 100-lb. kegs, 6 l-2c; No. 1 zinc, in 
casks, 5c; in 100-lb. kegs, 5 l-2c. 

White Zinc (ground in oil)— Pure, 25- 
lb. irons, 7 l-2c; No. 1, 6 l-2c; No. 2, 
5 l-2c. 

Putty— Bulk, in barrels, $1.40; in 
25-lb. tins and irons, $1.70; bladdered 
putty in barrels, $1.65. 

Orange Mineral— Casks, 7c; 100-lb 
kegs, 71-4c; smaller quantities, 81-4c. 

Red Lead — Genuine red lead in casks, 
$4; in 100-lb. kegs, $4.25; in less quan- 
tities, $5.25 per 100 lbs. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $2.75; kegs, $4, and smaller 
quantities $5. 

Litharge— Ground, casks, 5c; in less 
quantities, 5 l-2c ; flake litharge, casks, 
$5; smalls, $5.50 per 100 lb. 

Turpentine— Single barrels, 85c per 
gallon; 2 to 4 barrels, 84c per gallon. 
Smaller quantities than barrels, 90c per 
gallon. Standard gallon of 8.6 lbs. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 43e; 
5 to 9 barrels, 42c; boiled, 1 to 4 bar- 
rels, 46c; 5 to 9 barrels, 45c. Delivered 
in Ontario between Montreal and Osh- 
awa at 2c per gallon advance. 

Shellac Varnish— Pure white, $2. SO to 
$3; pure orange, $2.75 to $2.85; No. 1 
orange, $2.45 to $2.60. 

Mixed Paints— $1.20 to $1.40 per gal- 
lon. 

Castor Oil— 8 3-4 to 9 l-4c in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c additional for small 
lots. 



Canadian Paris Green — Barrels, 
14 l-4c ; arsenic kegs, 14 l-2c ; 50 and 
100 lb drums, 15c ; 25-lb drums, 15 l-4c ; 
1-lb packages, 16c; 1-2-lb packages, 
18c; 1-lb tins, 17c. Terms 2 per cent, 
discount for cash in 30 days or 90 days 
net. 

English Paris Green— Barrels, 141-4c; 
arsenic kegs, 14 l-2c ; 50 and 100 lb 
drums, 15c per lb ; 25 lb drums, 15 l-2c ; 
1-lb paper boxes, 16c; 1-lb tin boxes, 
17c. Terms, 2 per cent. 30 days; .90 
days net. 



Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front street east, 

Toronto, May 28, TO! 

ACTIVITY of exceptional degree is 
reported this week. Business in 
all lines, particularly white lead, 
mixed paints and varnishes, is larger 
in volume than was the case even last 
year. Prices are comparatively firm. 
White lead is steadier than for some 
weeks, while a strengthening tone is 
manifested in both turpentine and lin- 
seed oil. Other lines are unchanged. 
We quote : 

White Lead— Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, $4.65; No. 1, $4.20; No. 2, $3.90; 
No. 3, $3.50; No. 4, $3.25 in packages 



of 25 lb and upwards; l-2c per lb extra 
will be charged for 12 1-2-lb packages ; 
genuine dry white lead, in casks, $4.50. 

Red Lead — Genuine in casks of 560 
lb, $4.25; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb, 
$4.50; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb, $3.75 
to $4; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb, $4.25. 

White Zinc— Genuine, French V.M., 
in casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, 
$6 to $6.25. 

Shingle Stain— In 5-gallon lots, 60 to 
85e per gallon. 

Paris White— 90c to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting— 60 to 65c per 100 lb; Gild- 
ers' whiting, 75c. 

Shellac— Pure orange, in barrels, 
$2.50 to $3; white, $2.50 per gallon; 
No . 1, $2 . 37 1-2, including price of can . 

Linseed Oil— Our quotation is: Raw, 

1 to 4 bbls, 43c; boiled, 46c; 5 to 9 
bbls, raw, 42c ; boiled, 45c, ... Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, Elora and Guelph, 
net 30 days. Advance of 2c for deliv- 
ery to outside points. Another quota- 
tion is : Raw, 1 to 4 bbls, 43c ; boiled, 

46c; 5 to 9 bbls, 42c; boiled, 45c; 10 
barrels and over open, ex-Toronto, 2 
per cent, off 30 days. 

Turpentine— Single bbls, 81 to 83c; 

2 to 4 bbls, 80 to 82c; 5 bbls and over, 
open, Toronto, Hamilton, London, net 
30 days. Another quotation is: Single 
bbls, 84 1-2c; 2 to 4 bbls, S3 l-2c; 
5 bbls, and over, open ex-To- 
ronto with 2 per cent, off 30 days. 
For less quantities than barrels, 5c per 







w ,ANr 



Interior 



e«i" 



i 



Sand us a post oard 

and let us tall you 

all about them. 



ANCHOR and 

ENGLISH 

LIQUID PAINTS 

occupy a unique position among the different 
brands upon the Canadian market. They 
stand alone at the top, unrivalled for cover- 
ing power, permanency of color, and wear- 
ing qualities. The only white lead used in 
their manufacture is the best the world can 
produce — Brandram s B. B. Genuine. 



HENDERSON & POTTS, Limited, Halifax. 
HENDERSON & POTTS CO., Limited, Hontreal. 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




IT IS NEARLY 

MALP A CENTURY 

since we commenced to make Varnish. During this 
period we have acquired a knowledge not only of 
Varnish, but of the varied needs of varnish consum- 
ers that nothing but time can impart, and have also 
learned how to cater successfully to every varnish 
want. 

Our experience belongs to those who use and 
sell Berry Brothers' Varnishes. 

Safest goods to handle, surest and most re- 
liable goods to use. 

\AAFRITE FOR CATALOGUE. 

Berry Brothers 



LIMITED 



WALKERVILLE, ONT. 




43 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



May 28, 1904 



HOBBS MANUFACTURING CO. 



LONDON, 



CANADA. 



LIMIl ED 



importers sheet Window Glass, Muffled and Cathedral Tints, Ornamental Figured 
Glass, Polished British Plate, Rolled Plate Glass, Prismatic Sheet Glass. 



MANUFACTURERS 



Church and Cathedral Leaded Windows, Domestic Art Stained Glass. 

Bevelled Plate and Mirrors, Ceiling and Finger Plates, Memorial and Portrait Windows, 
Chipped, Obscured and Enamelled, Mitred and Sand Cut, Paper Weights and 
Advertising Signs, Electro Glazed Art Glass and Ornamental Prismatic Glass. 

f^ ^P" D ^^ ^^ I i#\ ^^ P* ^^ J\ D "TP ^^ I yV <^ <^ Not a cheap imitation of copper plate, not a dull flat finish, hut Electro Glazed 

1 ^"^ ■ ' *■ ^"^ ^^ ^™ ^^ ^^ ^™" *"^ ^^ ■ ^ ■ >^«™«^^«^»^ with a solid deposit of copper and a hright, clear, polished copper finish. 




RETURNE 
\Y 28 190 



No. 524 




Jr)fi ,- \ jjj^ggs^ai hw&mmi mmim^ \f/ 

We 1 HETU BNED| f0Z 



WBIIIII1IIII 



No. 526 



No. 527 







No. 525 

WE CARRY A LARGE STOCK OF WINDOW GLASS. QUALITY THE BEST. PRICES ARE RIGHT. WE MANUFACTURE 

AND IMPORT EVERYTHING IN GLASS REQUIRED FOR BUILDINGS. 
WRITE FOR CATALOGUE AND PRir.FS — 

44 



May 28, 1904 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



Rr> TUnDMr 768 Craig St, 
. C. inUrvHQ, MONTREAL 

Wholesale Agent and Importer 

Dry Colors, Ochres, Bronze Powders, 
Aluminum Powder, Schlag Metal, 
Bronze Liquids and Varnishes. 

Toronto Office— 29 Mellnda St. 



The QuicKesI 
Selling Metal PolisH 

is the usual remark of the trade 
when you ask them about 

SOLARINE 

It satisfies or your money hack. 
Write for sample order. 

SOLARINE DEPOT, TORONTO. 




New and Secondhand Machinery, 
Engines, Belting, Pulleys, Factory 
Equipment, Etc. 

Any readers of this paper wanting 
any of the above goods may have an 
advertisement inserted free in Hard- 
ware and Metal, the machinery 
weekly newspaper of Canada, by 
enclosing this notice. Address — 

HARDWARE AND METAL 

Montreal Toronto Winnipeg 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 

Manufacturers RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNISHES. 

•• HIGH GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES. 

MONTREAL 



GLUES AGAIN 



our IMITATION FRENCH MEDAL 
OLUES are of such high class 
and are so suitable for Export that we would like to quote you. Export trade 
in this line is growing rapidly, and we pack in casks or cases as preferred. 
Quality unrivalled. 

GROVE CHEMICAL CO LTD., Appley Bridge, Lancashire, Eug. 



We Have the Glass You Want 

— T HE PRICE IS RIGHT .— 

Our Distributing Centres keep down your freight charges and give a speedy delivery 



The Consolidated Plate Glass Co., of Canada, Limited 

TORONTO MONTREAL LONDON 

OTTAWA "WINNIPEG. 




Have you a 

Cranky Customer ? 



Of course you have. Perhaps you have several 
who are confirmed fault finders. Sell them 
ISLAND CITY paints and they will have to work 
overtime to find anything wrong. 

Toronto orders filled promptly from Montreal. 
We pay extra freight. 



TEMPORARY TORONTO PREMISES AT 23 SCOTT ST. 



P. D. DODS &t CO., Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver 



GROUND IN 
PURE REFINED 
LINSEED OIL. 



MONARCH 



PERFECT IN 
BODY, DURABILITY 
AND FINENESS. 



PURE WHITE LEAD 



SEND FOR QUOTATIONS 



MANUFACTURED BY 



STANDARD PAINT & VARNISH CO., Limited 



WINDSOR, ONTARIO. 



45 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



May 28, 1904 



Paint the 

Farm 

Buildings. 



1. There are many farmers who allow 

their dwellingsand farm buildings 
to go un pa in ted year after year 
under the delusion that they are 
saving money by so doing. 

2. How often one sees good, substan- 

tial buildings exposed to wind and 
weather for years without protec- 
tion. 

Such houses are sure to deterio- 
rate in value, to say nothing of 
the loss in appearance. 

3. An unpainted building on the farm 

gives it a run-down appearance 
no matter how well kept the 
grounds. 

Paint applied to all the buildings 
will increase the selling price, 
which is another way of saying 
will increase the value. 

4. A certain amount of pride exhibited 

in the farm buildings and grounds 
gives the would-be purchaser the 
impression that the entire farm is 
in good condition. 

5. Well-painted buildings lend an at- 

traction to the homestead that the 
young people of the family are 
sure to appreciate. 

They add an incentive to further 
beautify the home. 

6. The work of painting is not difficult. 

With the best of ready mixed 
paint, such as manufactured by 
THE CANADA PAINT COM- 
PANY, the farmer may, if he find 
the skilled labor too expensive, do 
the work himself. 

7. Time to paint. A dry, calm period 

is the best, and it should be 
neither too cold nor too hot. 
Avoid painting while the wind is 
blowing, as dust particles adhere 
to the fresh paint, causing it to 
present a most unsightly appear- 
ance. 



Dealers Should Address 

THE 

CANADA PAINT CO., 

MONTREAL or TORONTO. 



gallon extra will be added, and for 5- 
gallon packages, 50c and 10-gallon pack- 
ages 80c will be charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200-lb bbls, 
8 to 81-2c per lb; cabinet glue, in bbls, 
111-2 to 12c; emery glue, in bbls, 17c; 
bookbinders', ground, 101-2c; finest 
American, white, 19c; No. 1 American 
white, 15c per lb. 

Putty— Common, $1.65; pure (linseed 
oil) bladders in barrels, $1.70; bladders, 
in 100-lb kegs, $1.85; bulk in barrels, 
$1.4;"); bulk, less than barrels and up to 
100-lb., $1.70. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2 
per bbl. 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.40 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints— 55 to 70c per gallon. 

Bridge Paints— 75c to $1. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 7 1-2 to 
8c per pound, and 8 1-2 to 9c for single 
tins. 

English Paris Green — Petroleum 
bbls, 131-4c; arsenic kegs, 131-2c; 50 
to 100-lb drums, 14c; 1-lb packages, 
15c; 1-lb tins, 10c; 1-2-lb tins, 18c. 

Canadian Paris Green (present deliv- 
ery)— Petroleum bbls, 13 3-4c; arsenic 
kegs, 14c; 50 and 100-lb drums, 14 l-2e; 
1-2-lb tins, 18 l-2c. 

St. John, N.B. 

There is little out of which to make a 
market report. We have a new oil com- 
pany called the Canadian Oil Co., who 
have taken over the business of the Sun 
Oil Co., and the King Edward Oil Co. 
This last company was only here for a 
very short time. The Canadian Oil Co. 
is a Canadian concern, who have their 
own Canadian and American refineries. 
Besides handling burning, lubricating 
and paint oils, they are large handlers 
of paints. In prices no changes are re- 
ported. Linseeds are still low. 

Window Glass. 
Montreal. 
Window Glass — Business is active 
and prices are unchanged. We quote: 
First break, 50 feet, $1.70; second break, 
$1.80 for 50 feet. First break, 100 
feet, $3.25; second break. $.'5.4.'); third 
break, $3.95; fourth break, $4.20. 

TORONTO. 

Business continues to improve, and 
there is less tendency to cut prices. We 
quote nominally as follows: Star, first 
break at $3.30 ner 100 feet and Double 
Diamond, first break, at $5.10. Dis- 
count, 15 and 20 per cent. 
46 



Trade Enquiries 



Hardware and Metal will be pleased at any time to 
open its columns for trade enquiries relating to the hard- 
ware, metal, machinery or paint trades. Address enquiries 
to the Toronto Editor. 



CANADIAN AGENTS WANTED. 

An English firm, manufacturers of a 
brand of enamel, desire to appoint Can- 
adian agents in Canada. This line 
should have a good sale in Canada. 
Further information will be supplied on 
enquiry to Toronto Editor, Hardware 
and Metal. 



Government Enquiries. 

The names of the firms making these enquiries, together 
with their addresses, may 1 e obtained from the Department 
of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, by quoting office under 
which the enquiry appears and giving number. 

| CURATOR, CANADIAN SECTION IMPERIAL 

INSTITUTE. 

71. Inquiry has been received for the 
names of Canadian firms who supply the 
necessary materials for fitting up roll- 
top office desks. 

74. A Glasgow firm have asked to be 
placed in touch with parties in Canada 
"from whom they can get supplies of gra- 
phite; also for the names of a few good 
houses in the Dominion selling paints 
for ship requirements and engineers' 
use. 

42. Inquiry has been made for the ad- 
dresses of Canadian makers of elm bar- 
rel hoops. 

44. A correspondent desires the names 
of Canadian manufacturers of cultiva- 
tors suitable for fruit plantations, and 
also of apple and plum grading machin- 
ery. 

FROM COMMERCIAL AGENT, MANCHESTER. 

38. Manchester importers of calcium 
carbide at present buying in Sweden, 
are desirous of obtaining from Canadian 
manufacturers their prices for same c. i. 
[., Manchester. 

40. Request is made by a Manchester 
firm for prices of extension ladders from 
Canadian manufacturers of- same. 

41. The only manufacturers of adver- 
tising matches in Great Britain, already 
having a limited Canadian connection, 
are desirous of extending same, and 
wish to appoint a Canadian agent to 
effect this. 

42. A Manchester firm desires quota- 
tions of square and *-oval top wooden 
trunks from Canadian manufacturers of 
same. 






May 28, 1904 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



RIGHTS OF FOREIGN 



CREDITORS 
CASES. 



IN BANKRUPTCY 



^•pu 



FRANCE. 

HE laws of Fiance do not require 
that foreign creditors shall be 
represented before the courts by 
an attorney. This procedure is not 
alone superfluous, but also dangerous, 
for the attorney's fees are not regulated 
by law when dealing with foreign credit- 
ors and can be very much in excess of 
that prescribed by the French law. 

In France it is customary and advis- 
able, in a case of bankruptcy, to ap- 
point a local executor; most of these 
men belong to the commercial courts. 
These officials look after the interests of 
foreign creditors with a great deal of 
care, and, as a rule, obtain very good 
results. The usual method of procedure 
in such cases is for the foreign creditor 
to receive an official notification of the 
failure from an executor wherein he of- 
fers his services. If one has no regular 
representative at the place of failure, it 
is wise for him to accept the executor's 
offer and sign the power of attorney 
which he always incloses. 



(From United States Consul Monaghan, Chemnitz, Germany.) 

chant in Russia can be declared bank- 



The laws in 
bankruptcy are 



RUSSIA. 

Russia pertaining to 
very severe. A mer- 



rupt if his liabilities exceed 1,500 rubles 
($772.50) and he has not the ready cash 
to meet the same. He can be arrested 
and his retention depends on the good 
will of his creditors. It is claimed that 
this law has a very good effect on the 
business world, for it destroys the op- 
portunity of a certain class of business 
men to shirk the responsibilities which 
they have toward their creditors. 

A creditor who enters claim against a 
bankrupt must deposit 75 rubles ($38.63) 
for the cost of court. All foreign 
creditors must make claim within 
twelve months after date of failure, 
otherwise their claims are void. 

In Russia the court publishes the fact 
of the bankruptcy, but gives no official 
notification to the creditors; for this 
reason foreign creditors know nothing of 
the existing conditions until it is too 
late. 

For the above reasons it would be 
wise for exporters to keep a watchful 
eye on their outstanding debts in 
Russia. 

ITALY. 

In Italy creditors have the right to 
demand 6 per cent, interest on all debts 
not paid when due. Regularly accepted 
drafts which, are not honored at expira- 



tion can at once go to protest, but must 
pass through a notary's hands. The 
court executor can perform this duly, 
but the law demands several days' grace 
before the belongings of the debtor can 
be sold. 

All business men in Italy are com- 
pelled to keep two account books, and 
each and every transaction must be en- 
tered in each of these books. When a 
page is full a Government official comes 
and examines the same, and, if he finds 
it in order, stamps, numbers, and signs 
it. 

In case a merchant is pressed for pay- 
ment by a creditor and he can prove 
by his account book that his resources 
are greater than his liabilities, the court 
will grant the merchant six months' 
time to settle up with his creditors. 
During these six months his business is 
watched o^er by an official from the 
court and a representative of the credit- 
or or creditors. 

In the case of bankruptcy, creditors 
must send in their claims to the official 
who has charge of the case. All claims 
of foreign creditors must be attested to 
in order to show correctness of the 
creditor's demands. 

NORWAY AND SWEDEN. 

In these countries the only thing for a 
creditor to do is to send in his claims 
and make sure that the same are recog- 
nized. After this has been done he has 
the right to refuse to accept the propo- 
sitions offered by the bankrupt, and can 
insist upon court proceedings, in case he 
believes the bankruptcy was brought 
about with dishonest intentions. 



DON'T GO GROPING 
AROUND in the DARK 




BUT BRIGHTEN 

UP YOUR 

STORE 

AND 

FACTORY 
BY USING 



LUXfER 




LUXFER 


SIDEWALK 


and 


WINDOW 


PRISMS 




PRISMS 



Look Out! 



When you buy Green just examine 
the label and he sure that it reads and 
looks like this: 




LUXFER PRISM CO., 

LIMITED 

100 King St. W., TORONTO. 



That's your safe-guard. It means 
that the purest, most economical and 
durable paint in the world is 

LUCAS 

Imperial French Green 
JOHN LUCAS & CO. 



NEW YORK 



PHILADELPHIA 



CHICAGO 



McArthur, Corneille & Co., Montreal. 



47 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



STOVES AND TINWARE. 



Specifications for Tin Roofing. 

A WRITER in the Metal Worker 
gives the following practical ad- 
vice regarding tin roofing : 

Most of the leaky tin roofs I find to 
have given way at the seam. You may 
examine a leaky roof where good tin has 
been used originally, and you will find 
thai the sheet generally is in good con- 
dition, but all along the seam, on top, 
and on the edge you will find a number 
of little rusty spots, and in using a 
sharp point you can push it through in 
many places. Some will say the rosin 
was not properly scraped off after 
soldering. This is nonsense. The fact 
of the matter is, that most of the tin 
loots are practically ruined when the 
tinner gets off the job for the reason 
that he used "plenty of rosin, used a 
hot iron and soaked well." 

In soldering with rosin on top of the 
seam with a hot iron, it is true that by 
using plenty of rosin the seam is being 
soaked well, but on account of the great 
heat to which the rosin is subjected it 
will carry the solder and the original 
coating of the tin off the seam, leaving 
that part over which the iron was car- 
ried practically bare with a thin 
skimmed coat, having on it neither 
solder nor much of the original coating. 
Tiny specks of rosin will remain on that 
part which can hardly be scraped off be- 
cause they can hardly be seen. In course 
of time, however, these specks of rosin 
will crack off and take the tin with 
them. 

I have seen the very best of tin put on 
by the best workmen out of different 
shops in exactly the same manner as de- 
scribed above, and because of this ex- 
perience 1 have changed my way of 
putting on tin roofing, and the results 
have been very gratifying, and in men- 
tioning this to others who have had 
practical experience, I have found that 
their experience has been the same as 
mine. Of course, men who sit at the 
desk and let other men look after the 
work will never gain any real knowl- 
edge for themselves, but will always 
stick to the old theory of their fore- 
lathers. 

The way to put on a tin roof is to 
keep the rosin away as far as possible. 
Take muriatic acid, well dissolved with 
zinc; use 55 per cent, water and 45 per 
cent, acid; use this solution, solder well' 



and wipe off with a rag when done. In 
soldering with this solution, a little 
steam is created sufficient to chill the 
solder as the soldering iron moves along 
which prevents the solder from running 
off the seam. The movement of the 
soldering iron ought not to be too slow, 
especially when the iron is very hot. 

Since using this method 1 have yet to 
hear the first complaint of any tin giv- 
ing way in an unreasonably short time 
I would challenge any one to prove to 
me that I am wrong. 

Stoves and Fishins;. 

Peter B. Acker, the newly elected 
president of the National Association of 
Stove Manufacturers, is ' an ardent dis- 
ciple of Isaak Walton, and a firm believ- 
er in the benefits to a business man of 
going a-fishing occasionally. Therefore, 
it was only natural thai he should 
have found a neat comparison between 
angling and fishing for new members 
when accepting the presidency. He said: 

"I feel greatly surprised and greatly 
honored in your action in making me 
president of this splendid association. I 
shall do all I possibly can for the asso- 
ciation and for the increase of its mem- 
bership. 

"I shall endeavor to make some long 
casts during my term of office, and 
trust you will all stand ready with your 
landing nets. Again, 1 thank you for 
the great honor conferred upon me."— 
Metal Worker. 

The Canada Steel Range. 

The Moffat Stove Co., Limited, 
Weston, Ont., have issued a neat pam- 
phlet giving superb illustrations of their 
line, the Canada steel range. This 
booklet is one of the most attractive 
received by Hardware and Metal for 
some time, and will prove interesting to 
any hardware dealers who secure a copy 
of it. Copies will be furnished on ap- 
plication. 



WANTED HER MONEY BACK. 

An eastern hardware dealer, who 
handles sporting goods, tells of having 
sold a pair of dumbells which were re- 
turned some three years later, the lady 
in bringing them back stating that the 
boy for whom they were purchased had 
outgrown them. 



48 



Subscribe to the 

OIL AND COLOINU'S JOURNAL 

*or news of the Oil, Paint, Soap, Varnish, 
Chemical and Drysaltery Trades. 

Subscription, $2.00 per year from date. 
Sample for 10 cents. 

SCOTT, GREENWOOD & CO. 

19 LUDOATE HILL LONDON, ENO. 




COVERT MF6. CO. 

West Troy, N.Y. 

Auto Screw Jack 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 



FOR SALE BY JOBBERS AT MFRS. PRICE 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

I raiJ- „n *^-^^? Largest Variety, 

'* Toilet, Hand, Electric Power] 

. ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Ci rooming and 

Sheep-Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

SEND FOB CATALOGUE TO 
American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H..USA 

Wiebusch & Hilger, Limited, special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 






The FAIRGRIEVE GAS TOASTER 

Retails at 25c. The only Toaster guaranteed to toast on 
gas, gasoline or blue flame oil stoves without taste or smell. 
Write for prices. 

THE FAIRGRIEVE MANF6. CO., 

29S COLLEGE ST., TORONTO. 
U. S. Branch: 289 Jefferson Ave.. DETROIT 

Agents for Great Britain : Heine, Solly & Co., Sutton 
House, 2 Old Street, London, E.C. 



O. G. EAVETROUGH 

Conductor Pipe, Plain and Corrugated. 
Conductor Elbows, Plain and Corrugated . 
Hooks, Spikes and Solder. 

A FULL SUPPLY OF TINSniTHS' TOOLS. 




E. T. Writ & Co., Hamilton, Canada. 



May 28, 1904 

Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 




This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove & Hardware Co 

76 YORK ST.. TORONTO. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 

DIAMOND VISE AND DRILLING ATTACHMENT 

CJ. 8. Patent Jan. 15, '95. Canadian Patent July 22/95 




JAWS are faced with steel % inch wide, 4 inches long, 
firmly fastened to jaw, checked and hardened. 

VISE weighs 38 pounds. DRILL weighs 13 pounds. 

For Sale by Jobbers of Hardware. 

Made by— 

The Adams Company, Dubuque, Iowa, U.S.A. 

Made by Taylor-Forbes Co., Limited, Guelph, Ont. 




P-H 




SEE THAT MARK 

on Wrought Iron Pipe. When 
that mark is there you have 

The Highest Grade Hade 

in this country. Pipe that IS 
Pipe. The quality will be re- 
membered long after the price 
is forgotten. 

Send for Quotations. 




Page-Hersey Iron & Tube Co., Limited, Guelph, Can. 

Davidson's Milk Can Trimmings 

and Milk CanS with broad hoop patent bottoms 

give great satisfaction 
and are justly entitled to their 
popularity. 




IN COMPLETE 

SETS. 

"Broad Hoop" Pattern 
—Composed of the following: 
i Broad Hoop Bottom, i 
Cover, i Centre Hoop 6 in. 
wide, 20 gauge, i Broad Top 
Hoop, i pair Cover Handles, 
i pair Side Handles. 



Our BROAD-HOOP BOTTOM has all the 

advantages of a Seamless Bottom without the 
strain that spinning entails. 

BOTTOMS can be sweated in with very little 
solder. 

BOTTOMS are concave, draining to the 
centre, and are therefore easy to wash out and 
will not corrode. 

Top bands are shouldered and all bands have 
retinned edges. 

PATENT FLUSH SIDE HANDLES. 



WE CAN SUPPLY BEST QUALITY TINNED IRON 
AT LOWEST MARKET PRICES. 




Heavy Rolled Edges make our Patent Bottoms 
doubly durable and waggon and factory floor 
protectors. 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. Limited. . . .MONTREAL. 



Hardware and Metal 



May 28, 1904 




A Science Worthy of Respect. 

NOTHING to which the energy and 
ingenuity of man can be devoted 
is worthy of greater success than 
the work of modern practical plumbers, 
and yet how few, inside as well as out- 
side the ranks, stop to realize the benefi- 
cent character of their work and the 
practical blessing it confers upon human- 
ity, through protection from disease, 
when successfully and satisfactorily car- 
ried out. The layman's idea that any- 
( ne having a general knowledge of pipe 
and fittings is competent to instal a 
satisfactory job of plumbing is rapidly 
passing away, even in remote rural dis- 
tricts, and the "tinker" of old has been 
replaced by the educated, intelligent, up- 
to-date, practical plumber, whose better 
and more scientific methods are particu- 
larly noteworthy. 

Comparatively speaking, the science 
of plumoing is new ; that is, of! com- 
paratively recent growth, so that still 
further development of apparatus and 
methods may be looked for in the future. 
No one can deny, however, that progress 
has been and is still being made. No 
one need be ashamed because of lack of 
practically satisfactory results, yet what 
a grand field is here presented for im- 
pi< \ement end invention to utilize for 
the amelioration of mankind such 
knowledge as modern plumbers now pos- 
sess, supplemented by that which might 
be gained by the presentation of papers 
at local and national association con- 
ventions, giving the results of the ex- 
perimental researches of individual mem- 
bers, and by personal contact in social 
intercourse. What may yet be accomp- 
lished in an educational or purely busi- 
ness way through a freer interchange of 
experience by the plumbers' association 
as a body or by the members thereof in- 
dividually is, perhaps, but fairly con- 
ceived . 

Invention lias profoundly changed in- 
dustrial conditions, steadily falsifying 
all pessimistic predictions, and going 
hand in hand with a relative rise in 
wages and an improvement in the condi- 
tions of working people as a class. After 
having been much discussed in its relation 
In industry, mechanical invention has 
come to be recognized as beneficent, 
though its path to, recognition has been 



rough. The welfare and proper recogni- 
tion of the conscientious, practical, up- 
to-date plumber, as inventor as well as 
engineer, is largely in his own keeping. 
Every plumber should act well his part, 
and, having the interest of his calling at 
heart, shoud stand by those movements 
that tend toward possible improvement, 
in any and all directions. 

To be truly successful the plumber 
must be continually pushing and forging 
ahead, and the plumber who listens to 
the papers prepared by brother plumb- 
ers, or who reads them in a technical 
periodical and thereby learns what other 
men are doing, cannot help but be stimu- 
lated to improve his condition, both 
mentally and financially, ad as sure as 
he makes oe improvement he will want 
he makes one improvement he will want 
he has acquired every essential for the 
best and most successful operations, and 
his example will be of immeasurable 
value to fellow members of the craft, 
who will sooner or later be forced to 
adopt the advanced methods and prac- 
tices advocated and followed by the truly 
modern plumber.— Plumbers' Trade 
Journal. 



Plumbers Open Union Shop. 

A feature of the Montreal plumbers' 
strike this week is the opening up of a 
co-operative plumbing concern by the 
officials of the Journeymen Plumbers' 
Union, who have been on strike since 
May 3. They have rented a store at 
174 St. Dominique street, belonging to 
the Paquctte estate, and will conduct a 
business on a small scale at first, 
branching out in a more pretentious 
manner in the future. This is said to 
have been the design of the union for 
some time, and is now being put to a 
practical test. Two ex-members of the 
union have gone into business for them- 
selves, and are now employing union 
men. 

Otherwise the situation is unchanged, 
as far as the relations between the 
union and the master plumbers are con- 
cerned. However, there seems to be 
more of a desire on the part of both or- 
ganizations to do a little in the way of 
arbitration, but as yet nothing has been 
done. The masters are still determined 
that the present demands are beyond 
consideration altogether, and before a 

50 



settlement can take place there will 
have to be concessions on both sides. 



Building in Montreal. 

Building Inspector Chausse, of Mon- 
treal, in his annual report for 1903, 
states that 581 permits for new build- 
ings were registered during 1903, repre- 
senting $3,39,7,741 in value, and 429 per- 
mits for repairs to the amount of 
$550,992. The city erected several pub- 
lic buildings, among which may be 
mentioned fire stations, public baths, 
etc., the cost of which amounted to 
$145,863, so that a total of $1,094,569 
for building purposes was expended dur- 
ing the year, against $3,089,734 for the 
preceding year, thus giving an increase 
of $1,004,862 over last year. 



Building Notes. 

An Orange hall is to be erected in 
Marmora, Out. 

Additions are being made to the 
Guelph Collegiate Institute. 

The Gait Art Metal Co., Gait, Ont., 
are erecting a new factory. 

Mr. McEachern is erecting a brick- 
residence in Wellesley, Ont. 

The Gait Blast Furnace Co., Gall., 
are erecting a new foundry. 

Mr. McLaren, Winnipeg, will build a 
residence on Portage avenue. 

The Portland Methodist church, St. 
John, N. B., has been started. 

A new wing is to be added to the 
bonding warehouse in Toronto. 

A new collegiate institute is to be 
erected in Gait, Ont., at a cost of $35,- 
000. 

A large business block is to be erected 
on Main street, Winnipeg, to cost $50,- 
000. 

Ottawa is erecting a building at 
Lansdowne Park, for the fat stock 
show. 

Plans are being prepared for the new 
Normal school in Winnipeg, to cost 
$50,000. 

J. A. Thibodeau, Pembroke, Out., is 
going to erect a business block on Pem- 
broke street. 

Extensive additions are to be made to 
the Home for Incurables, Portage la 
Prairie, Man. 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW 

GLASS 



A. 



Large stocks are now arriv- 
ing and assortments are well 
maintained. Glass is in 
splendid condition. Send us 
your specification now, and 
have your order filled before 
assortments are depleted. The 
brand is good and the price 
is right. 



& 



MONTREAL. 



1 EST'D 

1842 



GLASS 
IMPORTERS 




GILLETT'S LYE 

—IS GOOD FOR— 

Brewers and Bottlers 

For Washing Barrels, Bottles, Etc. 

Sell Gillette Lye 



-TO- 



Brewers and Bottlers 



E. W. GILLETT COMPANY LIMITED 

TORONTO 




We want you to be agent for the 

Imperial Oxford Range 

in your district. You will find it 
a profitable proposition. The 
Imperial Oxford agent always 
does the range trade of his town. 
It is the stove that does it. The 
best cooker on the market, and 
so many people know it as such. 

WRITE FOR PARTICULARS 



The Gurney Foundry Co., Limited, 

TORONTO WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 

CORRESPONDENTS : 

THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO, LIMITED, 

MONTREAL, QUE. 

THE GURNEY STANDARD METAL CO., LIMITED 
CALGARY, ALTA. 



51 



Hardware and Metal 



HEATING AND PLUMB/NO 



May 28, 1904 




REMANIT 



M 



Saves more Heat 
by 20 to 30 per 
cent, than any 
Pipe Covering 
made. 



The next time you have a call for Pipe Covering be prepared and 
have on hand the best in the market — "REMANIT" — the Pipe 
Covering which fits both pipe and fitting, is moisture proof, does not 
deteriorate in use, and is the grestest non-conductor of heat of any 
pipe covering on the market. Dealers make money and satisfied 
users in handling this superior Pipe Covering. 



THE JAMES MORRISON BRASS MANUFACTURING CO., 

TORONTO, ONT. LIMITED 



There is to be erected at Craigmont, 
a new public school, 26x40 feet. 

A four-roomed schoolhouse is to be 
erected in Fort William, Ont., at a cost 
not to, exceed $10,000. 

Joseph Bedall, Winnipeg, will erect a 
three-storey business block near the 
Manitoba Club. 

D. McKillop is making large additions 
to his store on Saskatchewan avenue, 
Portage la Prairie. 

The Government are going to build a 
new drill hall in Hamilton, to cost in 
the vicinity of $50,000. 

C. Jeffries is the contractor for a new 
hall for the Oddfellows on Campbell 
street, Portage la Prairie. 

The building of the extension to St. 
John's church, Toronto Junction, will 
be proceeded with at once. 

W. Durance, Hamilton, will build 
three brick houses on Ferrie and Fergu- 
son avenue, to cost $3,000. 

The Canadian Bank of Commerce is 
erecting a large new building on Sas- 
katchewan avenue, Portage la Prairie. 

S. J. Simmons is the contractor for a 
large new block on Saskatchewan 
avenue, Portage la Prairie, for J. F. 
Ilobb. 

A dispatch from Gait, Ont., says that 
a Toronto corporation have undertaken 
the erection of from 40 to 60 dwellings 
in Gait. 

The Plow Co., of Paris, Ont., are 
about to add to their plant by the erec- 
tion of a warehouse at the north end of 
the building. 

McCullough & McPherson are erecting 
a new building for the Daily Graphic 
office on Saskatchewan avenue, Portage 
la Prairie. Sydney Bros, are the con- 
tractors. 

Building Permits. 

MONTREAL. 

E. D. Barrette, 265 Wolfe street, two 
houses, to cost $6,500. 

D. Pepin, 857 St. Dominique street, 
two houses, to cost $4,000. 



R. A. Ross, Crescent street, to erect 
one residence, to cost $10,000. 

Joseph Bernier, Fullerm street, to 
erect one house, to cost $4,500. 

Dr. F. Duller, 128 Stanley street, to 
erect one house, to cost $10,000. 

M. M. Chalup, to erect on Chambard 
street, one house, to cost $18,000. 

L. Mendel, 618 St. Lawrence street, 
to erect a building to cost $1,100. 

Max Usher, alteration on a dwelling 
on St. TJrbain street, to cost $1,500. 

Estate Masson, alterations at 2,254 St . 
Catherine street, on a dwelling to cost 
$3,000. 

Montreal Quilting Co., to erect on Guy 
street, near Notre Dame, one factory, to 
cost $15,000. 

Estate R. T. Godfrev. 2,278 St. Cath- 
erine street, alteration on one building, 
to cost $1,020. 

M. A. Weir, Cote de Neiges, one 
house to cost $4,000 and two houses, to 
cost each $3,000. 

Toilet Laundry Co., of Guy street, to 
erect at 411 Richmond street, one build- 
ing, to cost $5,500. 

Boston Shoe Store, corner St . Cath- 
erine and Mansfield streets, alteration 
on one store, to cost $2,500. 

Trustees of the Maternity Hospital, 
corner Prince Arthur and St. Urbain 
street, one hospital, to cost $65,000. 

LONDON. 

IT. Paisley, brick veneer cottage on 
Duchess avenue and Edward street. 

A. E. Tavlor, storey and half brick 
residence on north side of Pall Mall 
street. 

J. S. Moore, two-storey brick veneer 
dwelling on Oxford attid Wellington 
streets. 

OTTAWA. 

W. G. Charleson, solid brick store, 
south side of Rideau street, $2,000. 

St. Germain and Black, so"rid brick 
dwelling, west side of Cartier street, 
$2,600. 

52 



Evangeline Booth, solid brick Salva- 
tion Army citadel, south side of Slater 
street, $9,000. 

C. A. E. Harriss, brick veneered 
stable, south side of McKay street, prob- 
able cost $3,000. 

TORONTO. 

S. Crane, dwelling, Walmer road, 
$4,500. 

D. H. Reid, residence, Hampton ave- 
nue, $1,500. 

T . J . . Burns, residence on Brock ave- 
nue, $1,650. 

F. L. Hubbard, dwelling on Bathurst 
street, $1,000. 

Dr. Reeve, dwelling, Bloor and Park 
road, $13,000. 

Charles Mould & Co., Margueretta 
street, $7,200. 

E. Dalbv, two dwellings on Augusta 
avenue, $3,800. 

H. George, pair dwellings, West Lodge 
avenue, $3,000. 

St. Michael's Hospital, laundry in the 
hospital, $6,500. 

J. T. Hudson, dwelling, Palmerston 
boulevard, $4,000. 

Menzie Mfg. Co., brick factory on Pa- 
cific avenue, $9,000. 

W. B. Mitchell, dwelling, Roxborough 
street, east, $2,500. 

W. Burton, dwelling, Roxborough 
street, west, $4,800. 

James Hislop, dwelling, Roxborough 
street, east, $2,600. 

H. H. Dunning, dwelling, Roxborough 
street, west, $2,200. 

G. T. Clarkson, residence, 377 Bruns- 
wick avenue, $6,000. 

F. C. Keene, pair dwellings on Do- 
vercourt road, $4,000. 

J. A. Pinkerton, two dwellings, 99 
Victor avenue, $1,900. 

Dr. John Hoskin, a mission house on 
Buchanan street, $5,900. 

Mrs. Anxworthy, dwelling, Queen 
ptreet, near Jamieson avenue, $10,000. 

Consumers' Gas Co., machine shoo, 
on Front street, near ''Parliament street, 
$15,000. 

Wesley Bulmer, cement dwellino". 
Birtle avenue, $2,100; also pair dwell- 
ings on Dundas street, $3,000. 



May 28, 1904 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



Hardware and Metal 



CHARLES BAVNES, England. 

KNUZDEN BROOK, 
MAKER OF THE BLACKBURN, 

"CLICK-CLACK" 

HACK SAW BLADES. 



In Factory Solely 
Devoted to Making 
Hack Saw Blades. 



NONE 
BETTER. 



In All sizes 
of Best 
English Steel. 



The Hanover Portland Cement Co,, Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO. 

Manufacturers of '< C«* a > «***«%•. D»~ — «J" 
the Celebrated 5a U £8 6 II brand 

OF PORTLAND CEMENT. 

Prices on application. 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLES D. PHILLIPS, 

Cables— Emlyn Engineering Work* 

"Machinery," Newport. Newport, Mon., England 



Will Hold Up a Shelf ! 

That's what a sheirbracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothino Bet 
ter, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good proBt, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direct or through your jobber. 
ATLA8 MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.8.A. 




Manufacturers' 



Tp A Hardware and 

I " Metal has in- 

quiries from time 
to time from 
manufacturers 

Ajrcnts ? nd ° tnerswan t- 

S ing representat- 

ives in the leading business centres here 
and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their 
names and addresses placed on a special 
list kept for the information of inquirers 
in our various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 




It is a fact that one man with our PATENT 
PIPE DIE can easily do' the work of two 
men with any other. Send us your address 
and we will exphin HOW and WHY. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

Mfrs. TAPS and DIES. 
HESPELER, ONT. 



PIG IRON 



FOR 
IMPORT. 



Carnbroe, Summerles, Gartsherrie and Middlssboro', Glengarnock. 



Henry Rogers, Sons & Co., Montreal, P.Q. 




Canadian Patent, March 17, 1903. 



U. S. Patent, January 2C, 1904. 



They cost 

No More 
Than Wood 

Then why use the poor, 
defective, troublesome wood 
screen ? 

A practical man sees the 
difference in a moment. 

Send for description. 

I G. M. Cutis 4 Co,, Makers 

Toronto Junction. 




53 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



May 28, 1904 




factory on the Leak property, north 
of (lie Durrdas bridges, and the Board 
of Control have adopted the recommen- 
dation of the City Engineer that the re- 1 
quest he granted. 



Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source industrial news of any sort, the 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, etc. All such correspondence will be treated as confidential when desired. 



THE Oshawa manufacturing business 
of the Frost & Wood Co, will be 
removed to Smith's Falls; Lack 
of room in the Smith's Falls nlant has 
prevented (his being done before, hut 
wow since the enlarging of the mould- 
ing shop and the providing of oilier ac- 
commodations, the Oshawa business can 
he carried on in Smith's Falls. 

* * * 

The seven storev brick building of B. 
Leddux & Co., carriage builders, Mont- 
real, has been destroyed by fire, besides 
the contents. The loss is estimated al 
$300,000. The machinery was of the 
most modern type, and hundreds of 
valuable vehicles of Teat value were 
stored in the building. 

* * * 

The Canadian Iron Foundry Co. (for- 
merly the St. Thomas Car Wheel Co.), 
St. Thomas, Ont., have promised that 
if they were granted exemption of taxa- 
ton and water at manufacturers' rates 
by the city, they would commence the 
erection of new buildings at once. The 
buildings they propose to erect would 
cost $25,000 ,and they propose to turn 
out ten cars per day, employing from 
250 to :100 hands. 

*- * * 

The final location of the James Bay 
Railway will be very shortly decided, 
and within a month or so it is expected 
that grading will be started at several 
points along the line. Mr. Wm. Mac- 
kenzie, of Mackenzie & Mann, who are 
backing the James Bay project, says 
that the road will be built, whatever the 
action of the C. P. R. may be. 

* • • 

The Western Manufacturing Co., at 
present located at Indian Head, who 
manufacture various agricultural imple- 
ments, besides office and stoic fixtures, 
are requesting the City of Regina to 
»rant them assistance, in order thai they 
may be able to remove from Indian 
Head to Regina. The capital of the 
company is $50,000, of which $23,300 is 

paid up. 

* * * 

Th<' new factory of the Winnipeg Ceil- 
ing and Roofing Co., Winnipeg, at Fort 
Rouge will soon be in operation. This 



firm intend to manufacture all kinds of 
metal ceilings, corrugated iron roofings, 
sidings, cornices, skylights and fireproof 
windows. W. J. MeMartin, the man- 
ager, states that everything will he in 
readiness by June 1. 



Notes. 

A Presbyterian church is being erect- 
ed four miles north of Yarmouth Centre, 
Ont. N. R. Darrach, St. Thomas, is 
architect. 

The planing mill of Hie J. & J. Ken- 
Co., Ltd., Petrolea, Ont., has been par- 
tially destroyed by lire. 

The site of the I'etrie factory in Ham- 
ilton has been chosen, and work will 
he commenced at once. 

The London Tinplate Co., London, 
Out., have decided to move to Hamilton, 
the reason eiven being' that power would 
cost less in Hamilton than in London. 
The company employ thirty-eight hands. 

Fire has damaged the building and 
stock of Chadwick Bros., brass manu- 
facturers, Hamilton, Ont., to the extent 
of $8,000. The pattern room was con- 
siderably damaged by water. The brass 
moulding department escaped injury. 

Fort Frances, Rainy River Distrct, 
Out., is to have a new industry, pro- 
moted bv A. E. Cline and R. V. H. 
Keating, who intend to form a local 
company. The industry is to be the 
making' of concrete cement building- 
blocks. 

The sawmill of Mr. Haslam, Nanaimo, 
Vancouver Island, together with the 
valuable machinery installed, has been 
destroyed by fire. The loss is estimated 
at $05,000. The shingle mill adjoining 
was a 1st) damaged. 

Czerwinski & Grant, box manufactur- 
ers, Winnipeg, are preparing plans for 
the erection of a new factory on Logan 
avenue. The new factory will be very 
much larger than the present factory on 
Lombaid street. It will be of stone and 
brick. 

The Standard Varnish Works, of New 
York, have made an application to the 
City of Toronto to establish a varnish 
54 



Companies Incorporated. 

Thompson, Ltd., Sault Ste. Marie, 
capital $40,000; purpose, to manufac- 
ture and deal in merchandise. 

The Carlyle Construction Co., Ltd., 
Toronto, capital $100,000; purpose, to 
c.\)\\ on the business of a contractor. 

Sudbury Brick Co., Ltd., Sudburv. 
Ont., capital $20,000; purpose, to manu- 
facture and sell brick, tile and other clay 
products. 

The Stratford Carriage Co., Ltd., 
Stratford, Ont.. capital $75,000; pur- 
pose, to manufacture carriages and ve- 
hicles. 

The Armeda Weighing Machine Co., 
Ltd., Toronto, capital $100,000; purpose"} 
I anufacture and sell automatic weigh- 
ing machines. 

The South Essex Oil and Gas Co., 
Ltd., Leamington, Ont., capital $500,- 
000; purpose, to carry on the operations 
of a mining, milling, reduction and de- 
velopment company. 

The St. Anthony Gold Mining Co., 
Ltd., Ignace, Ont. capital $1,000,000; 
purpose, to carry on in all its branches 
the operations of a mining, milling, re- 
duction and development compan3'. 

The Ursa Major Co., Ltd., Toronto, 
capital $1,000,000; purpose, to carry on 
in all its branches the operations of 
mining', milling, reduction and develop- 
ment company. 

The Empire College of Ophthalmology, 
Ltd., Toronto, capital $40,000; purpose, 
to establish and maintain a college for 
the teaching of chemistry, physics, anat- 
omy, physiology of the eye, optometries, 
mathematics and mechanics. 

The Berlin Gasoline Engine and 
Thresher Co., Ltd., Berlin, Ont., capital 
$100,000; purpose, to manufacture and 
deal in gasoline engines, threshers and 
other machinery, some in the course of 
const ruction and others being- repah'ed. 

Licenses Granted. 

The .John Murphy Co., Ltd., incor- 
porated under the laws of the Dominion, 
to carry on business in Ontario. 

The Pacific Coal and Oil Co., Ltd., 
incorporated under laws of the Domin- 
ion, to carry on business in Ontario. 

The Detroit and Parry Sound Mining- 
Co., Ltd., incororated in the United 
States, to carry on their business in On- 
tario with a capital of! $50,000. 



May 28, 1904 




BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



-. 



Cut showing cornice work supplied the Union Bank, 

Winchester, Ont., by the metal Shingle <» Siding Co., 

Limited, Preston, Ont. 

Do You Know ? 



That we have an up-to-date Cornice Depart- 
ment in connection with our business ; in fact 
we employ several mechanics who are 
specialists in cornice work and we are prepared 
to make anything which can be constructed 

in the Sheet Metal Building Line. 

Estimates supplied from architects' drawings, 
print c , or rough sketches. 

Give our Cornice Department a trial and 
see what we can do for you. All work 
guaranteed. 

The fletal Shingle 
& Siding Co., Limited 

Preston, Ont. 



v^ 



Representatives : CLARE & BROCKEST, Winnipeg. 
ELLIS & GROGAN, Galgary. 



HORSE CLIPPER 
MAKERS 



Hardware and Metal 

TO HIS MAJESTY 
THE KING. 



The BARTON GILLETTE HORSE 
CLIPPING and SHEEP SHEARING CO., 

103 NEW OXFORD ST., LONDON. W.C. Limited 

SOMETHING ENTIRELY NEIV IN HAND CLIPPERS. 



THE 
CORONATION. 

Fitted with our 
Patent Ball Race 
which has enabled 
us to secure all 
prizes and medals 
awarded for Horse 
Clipping and 
S h eep Shearing- 
Machinery. 



USED EXCLUSIVELY 
IN THE 

Royal Stables. 




THE 
CORONATION. 

The plates ate 
considerably wid- 
er than those sup- 
plied with any 
other Clipper, thus 
enabling the user 
to do more work. 

PATENT ANTI-FRIC- 
TIONAL LEVERS 
and BEST FINISH. 



USED EXCLUSIVELY 

IN THE 

Royal Stables. 



AWARDED 2 FIRST PRIZES ROYAL SHOW OF ENGLAND BEATING ALL 

COMERS, AND 12 MEDALS AT VARIOUS AGRICULTURAL SHOWS. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Terms. Agents wanted everywhere. 

THE BARTON GILLETTE POWER CLIPPERS used ex- 
clusively in the stables of: — H.M. The King, H.R.H. The 
Prince of Wales, H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught, and all 
the leading nobility and gentry. 



T HE GURNE Y 

STANDARD SCALES 



Absolutely Accurate and Reliable. The Best of Material 
and Workmanship. Recognized throughout Canada as 

"THE STANDARD" 



lliillUiBiMilllii'llliiaiiltt 




We make scales of every description. Established 1856. 
Send for catalogue and printed matter. 

The Gurney Scale Co., Hamilton nt 

Eastern Warehouse : Western Warehouse : 

The Gurney Massey Co., Limited The Gurney Stove and Range Co- 
Montreal, Que. Winnipeg, Man. Limited, 



55 



Hardware and Motal 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



May 28, 1904 



HOW TO LAY A CEMENT FLOOR. 

' 1 HE following procedure for laying 
a cement floor is given by a cor- 
respondent in an exchange : In 
laying a cement floor, first determine 
your level and fall. You can either fall 
to middle or one end. We suppose you 
put fall to one end farthest from kennel. 
Excavate 4 inches from level, allow 1\ 
inches for fall. This will keep it dry. 
Then get some old brickstone or rub- 
ble, throw in, and break over in their 
bed to 2£ inches in depth with hammer. 
This will make , solid bottom as well as 
key for concrete. Then get your gravel, 
ground slag, or granite chippings, which- 
ever is the cheapest in your locality; 
put three barrows of one of these and 
one barrow of sand to one bag of 
cement; turn over twice dry, and then 
wet up, and turn once more. If you are 
going to put railings round, put boards 
on edge, about 4 or 5 inches deep, to 
hold up rubble and concrete. These 
would be best put to finished face of 
concrete, and they will act as screeds ; 
put in stakes to hold boards in position. 
You will now be ready for laying con- 
crete, which should average \\ inches in 
depth. If you have not boards up, lay 
a screed down either side to the level of 
finished floor about 6 inches wide. This 
will be a guide for your lath, which 
should be about 4 feet long. Fill-in the 
middle with concrete, and work off with 
lath to level of screed, to insure a true 
face. Allow about three hours for it to 
stiffen, then face up nice and smooth 
with a plasterer's steel float. Do net 
lay concrete on soil or clay, or it will 
bend and crack before long; and if the 
air is frosty, cover for a day or two 
with bags or matting, or it will skin, 
and ruin the face. It will take about 1 
carload of brick rubbish, 6 barrows of 
gravel, 2 of sand, and 2 bags of cement. 



CEMENT WORKS NEAR VICTORIA. 

Work has begun on the cement works 
on Saanich Arm, B. C. R. P. Butchart, 
of Victoria, at the head of the com- 
pany of eastern capitalists, who has had 
charge of all the arrangements, has be- 
gun operations on Tod Creek, where the 
works are to be established. He has de- 
cided upon the plans for the work and 
will carry them out as described in the 
Times some weeks ago. Provision will 
be made for the extension of the works 
as the demand for the commodity in- 
creases. Mr. Butchart has taken up his 
residence in this city on Rockland 
avenue. He has brought out from the 
east his automobile, a high-grade one, 
and will be enabled to keep a watch on 
the works as they progress. H. A. 
Ross, of Toronto, the secretary-treas- 



urer of the company, is also in the 
city. It will probably be eight or nine 
mojiths before the company is in a po- 
sition to begin the manufacture of 
cement. The complete equipment will 
be put in under the direct management 
of Mr. Butchart, no • contract being 
awarded for it. 



the centuries, overlaid with thick de- 
posits of asphalt large areas of land re- 
treating toward the sea."— Pearson's. 



NEW ROOFING CO. 

The Winnipeg Ceiling and Roofing Co. 
have nearly completed their new factory 
in Fort Rouge at the foot of Scott 
street. The ground floor will occupy a 
space of 50x220 and already some very 
heavy machinery has been installed 
in this department. The second storey 
of the building will be used as the cor- 
nice shop. The boiler and engine room 
is located at the rear of the factory. 
The new concern intends manufacturing 
all kinds of metal ceilings, corrugated 
iron roofings, sidings, cornices, sky- 
lights, fire-proof windows, etc. W. J. 
McMartin, the manager, states that 
everything will be in readiness by June 
1, when a full gang of skilled mechanics 
will be started to work. A neat and 
attractive catalogue is being published 
which may be had on application. 



WHERE BEST ASPHALT IS OB- 
TAINED. 

The best asphalt in the world is ob- 
tained in Venezuela from what is called 
Bermudez Lake. This "lake" is not a 
body of water, but a mass of brown, 
plastic mineral substance, somewhat 
less yielding than putty. It has an area 
of about one thousand acres. Its sur- 
face will sustain men and mules and 
vehicles of various kinds engaged in the 
work of digging it and shipping it 
away. This steady removal does not 
lessen the available quantity, as, slow- 
ly but steadily, this plastic mineral 
matter exudes from the bosom of the 
earth into the great natural Bermudez 
basin. 

"The Venezuelan asphalt is the purest 
known. But it excels only in very 
slight degree that found in a similar 
lake in the Island of Trinidad, which 
lies off the coast of Venezuela. Innum- 
erable asphalt deposits are found sact- 
tered over the globe, many of them in 
the United States, but all of them are 
far inferior in quality to those of 
Venezuela and Trinidad. Those two 
"lakes" constitute the world's sole 
sources of the highest grade asphaltum 
for paving and other needs. 

"Trinidad Lake is not so great in ex- 
tent as Bermudez Lake, but it is on 
high ground, and the overflow of this 
huge plastic mineral spring has, through 



ELECTRICITY IN CHINA, 

A contract is expected to be let 
shortly for the purpose of lighting the 
British settlement in Tientsin, 
China. There are to be two 100 kw 
generators direct connected to 13x14 in. 
engines. For the streets 250 arc lamps 
will be used. 



GENUINE 

PRATTS ASTRAL 
LAMP OIL 

Sold in all countries and recognized as the 
highest grade oil manufactured. 

WHOLESALE ONLY. 

THE QUEEN CITY OIL COMPANY, Limited, 
TORONTO, ONT. 



Metal Sash 

Bars, 

Capitals an J 

Bases for 

Plate Glass 

Windows. 

Various Finishes. 
Write for Prices. 

Dennis Wire 

4 Iron Co. 

London, Ont. 





MONEY 



There is money for everybody con- 
cerned in 

The Ormsby Skylight 

—for the hardware dealer who 
tenders on the job ; for the man who 
builds. 
The best skylight made. 

WRITE FOR OUR PROPOSAL. 



A. B. ORMSBY LIMITED, 

Cor. Queen and George Streets, 
TORONTO, ONT. 



56 



May 28, 1904 

, . FULL STOCK 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



Hardware and Metal 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



seweiWe 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

w CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON. ONT. TORONTO. ON?. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 

PORTLAND CEMENTS 

Best German, Belgian and English 
Brands. 

FIRE BRICKS 

FIRE CLAY 

FLUE LININGS 

DRAIN PIPES 

HARD WALL PLASTER 

CALCINED PLASTER 

WHEELBARROWS 

MORTAR STAINS. 

A Full Stock of Builders' and Con- 
tractors' Supplies. 

W. McNALLY & CO. 

40 to 53 Jlcaill St (Cor. Wellington St.) 

MONTREAL. 

Write for our quotations. 



Permanent. Economical. 

Handsome. 




Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing. 

Comes in rolls, ready to lay, with nails and cement. 
All ready covered with white sea gravel. No further attention after laid 

A. C. JENKING, Sole Agent, 
Room 2IS Coristine Building, - MONTREAL. 

Sun, Frost, Water, Fumes DO NOT affect it. Write to-day for agency. 




USE MICA ROOFING 



For Flat or Steep;|Roofs. It is Waterproof 
Fireproof, quickly !andj very easily Jaid, and 
cheaper than other roofing. 



HAMILTON MICA ROOFING CO., 



60 Catherine Street North, 



HAMILTON, CANADA. 



W/fJ / / / {JJg^0^^ 


^^^^^^3E 


CHEESE PRESS SCREWS, 

JACK SCREWS, 

MORTISE MACHINES 

-AND- S 

GENERAL CAST HARDWARE. j 


CONSTRUCTION vs. DESTRUCTION. 

CARE vs. CARELESSNESS. 
BEST MATERIAL vs. POOR MATERIAL. 
REX FLINTKOTE ROOFING vs. ALL OTHER ROOFING. 

mPCS^tiilfcote ^Roofuiff 


The above tells the whole story, and me 
bringing roofing vs. the ordinary kind tha 
and when they are persuaded to try it nev 
customers for roofing, you should write us 
J. A. &. W. BIRD & CO., 4 


ins to the dealer a quick -selling, business- 
t never sells, because people don't want it, 
er come back again. If you want satisfied 
to-day about Rex Fllntkote Roofing. 
P India Street, Boston, Mass. 


THE H. R. IVES CO., MONTREAL 

Limited. 



ATKINS c Ts g sTu e t SAWS 



ARE SUPERIOR TO ALL OTHERS IN MATERIAL, TEM- 
PER, WORKMANSHIP FINISH and CUTTING QUALITIES. 

OUR VICTOR, TUTTLE TOOTH AND SEGMENT GROUND SAWS ARE THE FAVORITES IN THE CAMPS 




THEiVJCTOR 
LAMCEWJ^ TOOTH' 



^WMfMsrmmnm 



V' 



II WW H 



wtwc$$^^ wmm 



E. C. ATKINS & CO., 



Leading Manufacturers of HIGH-GRADE, CROSS-CUT, HAND, BAND, 

CIRCULAR, HACK, BACK, WOOD and SMALL SAWS of all kinds 
INCORPORATED. 

Factories and Home Office : INDIANAPOLIS, IND., U.S.A. Write for Catalogue and Prices 

C. D. TEN EYCK, Sales Agent, for Canada. Toronto Office ; 30 Front St. East. Tel. Main 1896. 



»7 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Roofing Felt Factory 

Harbor St., 



Morxtre al. 



Paper Manufacturers 



May 28, 1904 

Paper Mills, 

Joliette, 
Quebec. 



Building Papers * ucW D,amond Br *n<i Brown •- Manilla Wrapping 

Ready Roofing ^^ Hanging and Print, 

Pitch and Roofing Cement ^kred fe^ • Colored Papers 

ALEX. McARTHUR & CO., Office 82 McGill St., Montreal 



LIMITED. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



May 28, 1904. 

These prices are tor such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at better prices. The 

Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $30 00 $31 00 
TI1S PLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 

iVl.L.S., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

I C, usual sizes $6 50 

IX " 8 00 

IXX " 9 50 

Famous, equal to Bradley— 

IC 675 

IX 825 

IXX 9 75 

Kaveu and Vulture Grades— 

I C, usual sizes 4 25 

IX " 5 00 

IXX " 5 75 

I X X X " 6 50 

"Dominion Crown Best" — Double 

Coated, Tissued. p er DOX 

IC 5 50 ' 

IX 6 50 

XX 7 50 

Allaway's Best "--Standard Quality. 

IC 4 50 

IX 5 50 

IXX 6 50 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual size, 14x20 3 35 

I.C., special sizes, base 3 60 

20x28 7 10 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

I.C., 20x28, 112 sheets .... 7 50 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs.~) 

" 14x60, " [ ... 7 00 
" 14x65, " ) 
Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 7 25 7 50 

r " 26 " 7 75 8 00 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 1 80 

Refined " " 2 20 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 25 

Hoop steel, 15 to 3-in. base 2 75 

Sleigh shoe steel, " 2 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

T. Firth&Co. stool steel, per lb 12| 13 

B. K. Morton & Co, 

" Alpha " Air Hardening tool steel.. 70 

" M " Self-Hardening 50 

" I" Standard 14 

Jessop's high speed steel 60 

" standard tool steel 14 

" rruciblesheet steel 14 

Chas. Leonard stool... 08 09 
Crucible Steel Co. 

Black Diamond 10 11 

" Silversteel 13 

" Special 17 

" Rex high speed steel.. 65 75 

Self Hardening 45 50 

Sanderson's Crucible Tool OS 09 

Superior " 12 13 

Extra Anlcl 15 

Self Hardening. ... 45 50 

Rex high speed.... 65 75 

Jonas ft Colver's tool steel 10 20 

" " Air Hardening" 70 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 



BABBIT METAL. 

" Tandem," A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

c " 0115 

Frictionless Metal " 23 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 40 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine, 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 

Star 15 

No. 1 12 

No. 2 10 

No. 3 06 

No. 4 05 

Geo. Langwell & Son. 

No. 1 08 

No. 2 07 

No. 3 055 

Extra 095 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

10 and 16 gauge 2 25 2 50 

18 gauge 2 30 2 50 

20 " 2 30 2 50 

22 to 24 gauge 2 35 2 70 

26 " 2 40 2 80 

28 2 40 2 90 

COPPER WIRE. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary 2 60 

All bright 3 50 

Galvanized Canada Plates — 

Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queen's 
Fleur-de-Lis..Gordon Crown. Cornet Bell. Head 

16 gauge 3 65 

18 to 24 gauge . . 3 75 3 75 3 75 3 75 

26 " .. 4 00 4 00 3 90 4 00 

28 " .. 4 25 4 25 4 05 4 25 

American brands, $4.00 for 28 gauge. 

Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

CHAIN. 

Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb. 7 00 10 00 

J " 5 60 

5-16 " 4 45 

"I " 3 85 

7-16 " 3 70 

5 " 3 55 

9-16 " 3 45 

i " 3 35 

f " 3 25 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65- p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting, .-ar lots 13 75 

Bars. 
Cut lengths, round, 5 to i in. . 21 00 23 00 
round and square, 
1 to 2 inches.... 21 00 23 00 



Sheet. 

Plain, 16 oz., 14x48 and 14x60 .... 20 00 

Plain, 14 oz 2100 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 22 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 21 

50-lb. and above " .... 20 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, bard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 235 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 00 6 25 

Domestic " " 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-cwt. casks 6 15 6 50 

Part casks 6 50 7 00 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 20 3 30 

Bar, per lb 05 

Sheets, 25 lb. sq. ft.., by roll 06} 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets 5c. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. f.o.b. Toronto. 

Note.— Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb. 7 50 8 00 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.: chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 175 P-c. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 3 p.c. cash, freights equalized. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

BATH TUBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 

Standard Enameled. 

55-ft. rolled rim, 1st quality 21 60 

5$ " " "2nd " 17 85 

CLOSETS. Net. 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Simplex Syphon Jet 9 00 

Emb. " " " . . 9 50 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain. . 6 00 

Low " " " emb. .. 6 50 

Connection 1 25 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

Emb. " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 63 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 Oo 

iron PIPE, 
Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

Sineh : 3 05 
2 07 
" 2 25 

J " 2 50 

I " 3 22 

1 " 4 58 

H " 6 47 

15 " 7 85 

2 " 11 05 

25 " 19 25 

3 " .■ 22 75 

35 " 28 75 

4 ' . .'. 35 25 

45 " 4100 

5 " 44 00 

*' 57 50 

58 



Galvanized pipe — 

I inch 2 88 

f " 3 11 

1 342 

I 4 40 

1 " 6 35 

H " 8 80 

H 10 75 

2 14 80 

Malleable Fittings— Discount 20 p.c. 

Cast Iron Fittings— 

Standard,575 per cent.; unions,55 per cent.' 
on nipples, headers and flanged unions, 60 
per cent. 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work, dis. 60 & 10 p.c. 
Cushion work, discount 50 per cent. 
Fuller work, discount 70 per cent. 

6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per rent. 

Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount 60 

per cent. With, in lots of 2 dozen and over 

an extra discount of 10 per cent. 
J. M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis 

count 55 per cent. 
Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 

discount 60 per cent. 
Kens special standard globes and angles, 

discount 60 percent. 
Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc and 

heavy standard valves, discount 60 percent. 
Kerr's standard brass checks, discount 60 p.c. 
Kerr's standard brass disc steam radiator 

valves, discount 70 per cent. 
Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc radia- 
tor valves, discount 70 per cent. 
Kerr's quick - opening hot - water radiator 

valves, discount 70 and 10 per cent. 
Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 

valves, brass, discount 55 per cent. 
Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 

valves, I.B.B.M., discount 70 per cent. 
J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent. 
Standard Radiator Valves, discount 60 per 

cent. 
Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount 65 

per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath cock net 1 75 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No .7 Fuller's " 2 10 

No. 4J, " " 2 25 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 

cock, hot and cold per doz. 15 00 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 

cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 55 percent. 

" " iron " " 50 to 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

RANGE BOILERS. 

Dominion, 30 gallon net 4 75 

35 " " 5 75 

40 " " 6 75 

Copper, 30 gallon " 22 00 

u 35 " " 24 00 

" 40 " 28 00 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 

SOID PirE AND FITTINGS. 

Light soil pipe, discount, 50 per cent. 

" " fittings, discount 50 and 10 p.c. 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 60 
per cent. 

7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

solder. Per lb 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 19 

Bar, half-and-half, commercial 18 

Refined 18 

WRENCHES. 

Acme, dis 30unt35 to 375 per cent. 
Agricultural, discount 60 per cent. 
Coe's Genuine, discount 20 to 25 pe cent. 

Towers' Engineer each 2 00 7 00 

S per doz. 5 80 6 00 

G. ftK.'sPipe " .... S 40 

Bun-ell's Pipe each S 00 

Pocket per doz. 25 2 90 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BEAMS 1.500 TONS FOR SALE 

_ ^^ All of this material in lengths from 40 to 60 feet. 

g LJ ft A] Al t^ ^^ We can ship promptly, and should be pleased to receive your order. 
\p I I^VIX Y\ LrLy^ Prices and stock lists on application. 

ANCLES ST[[L m[ BUILeiNGS ai)(l fi00F IfiUSSES - 

"■ * wfc*^w Also Steel Bridges for Railways and Highways. 

PLATES m HAMILTON BRIDGE WORKS COMPANY 



LIMITED 



Long Distance Telephone, Hamilton 630. HAMILTON, CANADA. 



PAINTS AND OILS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 

1-lb. tins, pure. 

Venetian red, per lb 08 

Chrome yellow 15 

Golden ochre C8 

French " 06 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green 10 

French permanent green 13 

Signwriters' black 15 

COLORS DRY. 
Pure in bbls., per cwt. Less than this 
quantity Jc. extra. 

Common ochre, bbls 2 50 

Yellow ochre 1 12$ 

Brussels ochre 2 75 

Venetian red, 1 50 2 25 

English oxides 3 00 3 25 

American oxides 1 25 2 75 

Canadian red oxides , 1 50 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c 2 00 

Burnt sienna 9 00 

" umber 6 00 7 00 

Raw umber 6 00 7 00 

Drop black 12 00 

Chrome yellow 18 

Chrome greens 5 50 

French green 09 

Golden ochre 2 75 

Ultramarine blue, in 28-lb.bxs 7 00 10 00 

Fire proof mineral 1 00 

Genuine Eng. Litharge 4 50 

Mortar color 1 00 

Pure Indian red, lb 09 

Whiting, bbl 65 

English vermilion in 30-lb. bgs. ... 85 
WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 

Pure 4 75 

No. 1 4 50 

No. 2 4 25 

No. 3 3 871 

No. 4 3 50 

Munro's Select Flake White 4 75 

Elephant and Decorators'Pure 4 75 

Monarch 5 00 

Decorator's Pure 4 75 

Essex Genuine 4 25 

Sterling Pure 5 00 

Island City Pure 5 00 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 4 75 5 00 

Ramsay's Exterior 4 50 4 75 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, per cwt $4 25 $4 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " 4 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 00 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 25 

WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 00b 008 

French V. M 06 06} 

Lehigh 06 06} 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 4 50 

Pure, kegs 4 75 

No. 1, casks 4 25 

No. 1, kegs 4 50 

PREPARED PAINTS. 

In }, * and 1-gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 1 20 

Second qualities, per gallon 1 00 

Barn (in bbls.) 60 90 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 1 30 1 40 

Canada Paint Co. s pure 1 25 

Toronto Lead & Color Cos pure 125 

Sanderson Pearcy's pure 1 20 

Standard Co. 's "New Era." 130 

"Globe ' barn 60 70 

Francis-Frost Co. 's "Ark" B'd 125 

" British Navy deck 1 50 

Henderson & Potts's "Anchor" 135 

Ramsay's paints, Pure, per gal 1 20 

" Thistle, ,r .... 1 00 

Outside, bbls 55 65 

Island City House Paint 1 25 

Floor " 1 25 

Sterling House Paint 1 20 

Floor " 1 10 

National 1 05 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1 45 

Bulk in less quantity 1 70 

Bladders in bbls 1 ',0 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 1 85 

25-lb. tins 1 80 

121 lb. tins , 2 05 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 1 85 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

No. 1 90 100 

Hard oil finish 1 35 1 50 

Light oil finish 1 60 1 70 

Damar 175 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

orange 2 30 2 40 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

11 No. 1. 85 90 

Elastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels ; size 1, $1.20 ; 

size 2, 70c.; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal., $2.50. 

GLUE. 

Common 08 084 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 



HARDWARE. 

AMMUNITION. 
Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and 5 and 25 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 40 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion, 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, add 5 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p.c, Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades, 25 per cent, discount. 
Rival and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on 
list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 percent.; American, $1.75 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

J-lb. bags SO 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxeB 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 25 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each— 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 



ADZES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over 103 

Hay Budden, 80-lb. and over 09} 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11} 

AUGERS. 
GUmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 
Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 10 00 

AMERICAN AXE AND TOOL CO. 

Red Ridge, boys', handled 5 75 

hunters.. 5 25 

AXLE GREASE 

Ordinary, per gross 6 00 7 00 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 



BELLS. 

Hand. 



Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 63§ per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 50 and 10 
per cent, off new list. 

Farm. 
American, each 1 25 3 00 

House. 
American, per lb 35 40 

BELLOWS. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 ner cent 

BELTING. 

Extra, 60 per cent. 

Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour's, discourt 60 per cent. 
Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour s, 47$ per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 065 090 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07J 12 

bolts and nuts Per cent. 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) 

" 3-16 and J 60 

" 3-16 and 1 55 and 5" 

" " 7-16 and up 55 

" full sq. ($2. 40 list) 60 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, £ and 

less 60 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

Bolt Ends 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, Bquare, ad sizes, 4c. per lb. off. 

Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c. per lb. off. 
Stove Rods per lb., 5$ to 6c 

BOOT CALKS. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS. 

Discount 62$ per cent. 



BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 9 00 

American... " 12 00 18 00 

BUTCHER KNIVES. 

Bailey's per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, per 100 lb 85 

Ready roofing, 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll . 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb. , 

per roll 1 15 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 0C 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. & I. X. L . . . . " 400 " 70 

Resin-sized ' 400 ■« 45 

Oiled Sheathing.... " 60C •' 100 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 1 10 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper, $2.00 for 2$-inch, and $1.9 or 2-incn 

BUTTS. 

Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
Loose Pin, discount 60 per cent 
Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and 2$ per cent. 
Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 2$ per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70, 70 and 5 percent 
Gen. B ronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 1 00 1 50 

Bullard's " 6 50 

CASTORS. 
Bed, new list, discount 55 to 57$ per cent. 
Plate, discount 52$ to 57$ per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 8 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump per cwt. 60 65 

Red 05 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 

CHISELS. 

Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad's, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnock's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

FOODS— STOCK. 

Colonial Stock Foods, ' 0c. packages, 

per doz $4 00 
" " " 25c. pkgs., " 2 CO 

" " " 10c. " " 75 

" " " 25-lb. pail, each 1 30 

Poultry Foods, 25c. packages 1 25 

Cough Powders, per doz 1 2i 

Worm " " 1 25 

Intemation 1 Stock Foods. $1 packages, 

perdoz i( .... 8 00 

International Stock Foods, perp il 2 75 

per bbl .... 10 50 

Poultry " Slpkgs.ptrdz. 8 00 

" Worm Powders. 50c pkgs. " 4 00 

" Pine Healing Oil. per doz ... 8 00 

Pheno-Chloro,Slpkgs.,perdoz 8 00 

Hoof Ointment 8 00 

" Compound Absorbent 16 00 

Also 25c pkgs. at $2 per doz. 50c, pkgs. at 
4 per doz. 

clips. 
Axle, discount 65 per cent. 



59 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



Two Paper Mills and Three Factories Busy 

making Paterson's Wire -Edged Ready Roofing, Building Papers 
and Roofing Felts. 

Our success is due to the fact that we make the goods the people want, 
and our customers know their orders will be promptly and carefully filled. 

The Paterson Mfg. Co., Limited 

Toronto and Montreal. 



COMPASSES, DIVIDERS, ETC. 
American, discount 62i to 65 per cent. 

CONDUCTOR PIPE. 

Plain or Corrugated. 

g-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

J " " " 4 00 

4 " " " 5 25 

5 " " " 675 

i " " " 9 00 

CRADLES, GRAIN. 

Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

8. t D., No. 3 per pair 171 

8. k D., " 5 f ' 22J 

8. fcD., " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey's Rod per doz 1 75 

Coil, 9 to 11 in " 95 1 65 

English " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Ooaoh and Wagon, discount 50 pet oent. 

Carpenters discount 60 and 10 per sent. 
DRILLS. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar's Falls, per doz., net list. 

DRILL BITS. 

Aloree, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FAUCETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUGHS. 

10-inch per 100 ft. 10 00 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

5 and 6-inch, common per doz. 1 20 

7-inch " 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 
Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 

Kearney & Foot 70 " 10 " 

Disston's 70 " 10 

American 70 " 10 " 

J. Barton Smith 70 " 10 

MoClellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 10 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 274 per cent. 
Nicholson File Co .'» "Simplicity " file handle, 

per gross 85c. to $1.50 

GLASS. 
Window. Box Price. 

Star D. Diamond 

Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inohes. 50 ft. 100 ft. 50 ft. 100 ft. 

r Tnder 26 3 80 .... 5 06 

26 to 40 4 00 .... 5 44 

41 to 50 4 50 .... 6 56 

51 to 60 4 75 .... 7 50 

61 to 70 5 00 .... 8 62 

71 to 80 5 30 .... 9 38 

81 to 85 10 75 

86to»0 12 30 

91 to 95 15 00 

96to 100 . . 18 00 

Discount 15 per cent. 



GAUGES. 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley s. discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nob. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 2 40 

GILLETTS POWDERED LYE. 

1-case, $3.60 ; 3-case, $3.50 ; 5-case and over, 
$3.40. 

HALTERS. 

Rope, 1-inch per gross 12 00 

Rope, I " ' r .... 9 00 

Rope, f to J-inch " 14 00 

Leather. 1-inch per doz 4 00 

Leather, U " " .... 5 20 

Web " .... 2 45 

HAMMERS. 

Nail. 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 274 per cent. 
Tack. 

Magnetic per doz. 1 10 1 20 

Sledge. 

Canadian per lb. 074 084 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian, per lb. 22 25 

HANDLES. 
Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 3 00 4 00 

tore door per doz. 100 150 

Fork. 
C. k B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Hoe. 
O. k B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 
Saw. 

American per do» I 00 1 25 

Plane. 

American per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 



HANGERS. 



Steel barn door. 
Stearns, 4-inch 
" 5-inch 
Zenith 



doz. 
! 00 



pairs. 

10 00 
4 50 
6 00 
9 00 

8 40 

10 80 
12 60 
21 00 

11 00 

3 75 

4 75 



Lane's covered — 

No. 11, 5-foot run 

No. 114, 10-foot run 

No. 12, 10-foot run 

No. 14, 15-foot run 

Steel, covered 4 00 

" track, 1 x 3-16 indOO ft) .... 
" 1} x 3-16 in(100 ft) .... 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 424 per cent. 

HAT ENAMEL. 

Henderson k Potts' "Anchor Brand " 

HINGES. 
Blind, Parker's, discount 60 per cent. 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb: 064 

5-in., " 06} 

6-in., ' 06 

8-in., " 05| 

10-in., " 054 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per oent. 
Screw hook and hinge— 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in. up " .... 3 25 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs 10 50 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE. 

Tinned cast, 35 per cent. 

HOOKS. 

Oast Iron. 
Bird oage per doz. 50 1 10 

60 



Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat . . per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 60 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 60 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 60 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 
"C" brand, 40, 10 and 74 per cent, off list (Oval 
"M" brand, 55, per cent. I head 

Countersunk, 574 per cent. 
"Monarch," 50 and 74 per cent. 
1 ' Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 

I ight, medium and heavy 3 65 3 90 

Snow shoes 3 90 4 15 

Steel Shoes. 

XL, sizes 1 to 5 5 35 

Light, No. 2 and larger 3 80 

No. 1 and smaller 4 05 

Featherweight, all sizes to 4 5 35 

Toeweight, all sizes 1 to 4 6 60 

JAPANNED WARE. 

Discount 50 per cent. 

ICE PICKS. 

8tar per doz. 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 

Brass spun 74 per cent, discount off new list. 

Copper per lb. 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 per cent. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet, trunk and padlock, 
American per gross 60 

KNOBS. 

Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine .... " 6 00 9 00 

Shutter, porcelain, F. k L. 

screw per gross 1 30 00 

White door knobs per doz 00 

HAY KNIVES. 
Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS. 

Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast perdoz. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. ■; 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined perdoz. 2 20 5 60 

Galvanized " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LINE'.). 

Fish per gross 1 05 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LAWN MOWERS. 

Woodyatt, 104-in. wheel, 14-in. cut . . 8 50 
Star, 9 -in. " " . . 7 00 

Daisy. 8 -in. " " (net) 2 874 

Philadelphia,74-in. " " .7 00 

Ontario, 74-in. " " .. 15 80 

King Edw'd, 12-in. " " ..950 

Discount, 50 per cent., with freight conces- 
sions in quantity shipments. 

Maxwell & Sons : 

10 l / 2 -in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 4 90 5 50 

Discount 50 per cent. 

LOOKS. 
Canadian, 50 to 50 and 10 per oent. 
Russell & Erwin . . . per doz. 



Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 6 00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths perdoz. 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 385 500 

Caulking, each 60 2 00 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per doz. 5 50 f 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

American, discoun 3j per cent. 

German, 15 per ceu 

Gem each 1 15 

MILK CAN TRIMMINGS. 

Discount 25 per cent. 

nails. Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d 3 30 3 45 

3d 2 95 3 12 

4and5d 2 70 2 95 

6 and 7d 2 60 2 80 

8 and 9d 2 45 2 60 

10 and 12d 2 40 2 55 

16and20d 2 35 2 50 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 30 2 45 

Cut nails in carlots 5c. less. 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.40. 

Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 15 per cent. 

Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent. 

nail pullers. 

German and American 1 75 2 50 

nail sets. 
Square, round and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 

Diamond 100 

POULTRY NETTING. 
2-in. Mesh, 19 w.g., dis. 60 per cent. 
2-in. Mesh, 16 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.c. 

OAKUM. 

U. S. Navy per 100 lb 6 75 

Plumbers " 3 00 

OILERS. 
McClary s Model galvanized 

oil can, with oump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent, 

Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent. 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount 45 per con* 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cen*:. 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. 

PICKS. 

Per dozen 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 

Tin and gilt, discount 75 per cent.. 

PINE TAR. 

4 pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

1 " " " .... 9 60 

PLANES. 
Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cen'., 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 374 t<- 

40 per cent 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AHD METAL 



U. M. C. INENA/ PRODU 

The .32 Automatic Colt Pistol Cartridge is loaded with a special high power smokeless powder, giving high velocity and operating free 
hrough the mechanism of the Automatic Colt Pistol (pocket model). Those with the soft point bullet will be found desirable for sporting pur 
poses, and those with metal case for military and target use. 

RIM FIRE CARTRIDGES 

The U. M. C. .22 automatic rifle (Winchester model 1903) cartridge is now ready for the market. New .22 short ungreased, 22 long 

ungreased, and .22 Winchester inside lubricated are inexpensive rim fire cartridges loaded with the best grade of smokeless powder. Boys ar 

calling for these cartridges, as they can be carried loose in the pocket without the old inconvenience of the greased cartridge. They will not lead 
he gun. "U. M. C. Ammunition shoots well in any gun." 

THE UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE CO., 



Acjenct) 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 
313-15 Broadway, New York City, N.Y. Depot 



86-88 Pirst St., San Francisco, CI. 



PLANE IRONS. 

English perdoz. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, discouut 
37J to 40 per cent. 

Buttons imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

German " 60 60 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Discount 20 per cent. • 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse per doz. 55 1 00 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 27 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 1 80 3 60 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddlers perdoz. 100 185 

Conductors '.' 3 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid perset — 72 

" hollow per inch 100 

RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up 

razors. per doz. 



Elliots 4 00 

Geo. Butler's & Co. s 4 00 

Boker's 7 50 

King Cutter 12 50 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 

Theile & Quack's 7 00 

Carbo Magnetic 

Griffon Barber s Favorite 

Griffon No. 65 

Griffon Safety Razors 

Griffon Stropping Machines. . 
Lewis Bros ' Klean Kutter" 



8 50 



18 00 
18 00 

11 00 
15 00 
10 00 

12 00 
15 00 
10 75 

13 00 
13 50 
13 50 
10 50 



registers. 
Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, 4c 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in J-lb cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 45 
per cent, discount. Cartons, lc. per lb. 
extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 and 10 per cent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, 4-lb. 
cartons, lc. per lb. 

rivet sets. 
Canadian, discount 35 to 374 per cent. 
ROPE, etc 

Sisal Hi 

Pure Manilla 144 

"British'' Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 21 

" 5-32 inch 25 

i inch 25 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute 08 

Lath Yarn, single 104 

double 11 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 80 

" 72 feet " 95 

RULES. 

Boxwood, discount 55 per cent. ' 

Ivory, discount 374 to 40 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 80 

No. 50, nickle-plated, " 90 

Common, plain 4 50 

plated 5 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

B. & A. sand, discouut, 40 and 5 per cent 
Bmery, discount 40 per cent. 
Oamet (Rurton's) 5 to 10 per cent, advance 
on list 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

"Eureka' tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston's, discount 124 per cent 
S. & D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's per foot 35 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

41 frame only each 50 125 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 100 lb. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 28 30 

saw sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X-CutSets, " 7 50 

SCALES. 
Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 
Gurney Champion, 50 per cent. 
Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40 per cenc. 

Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 

Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 
Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 

" Dominion, discount 55 per cent. 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 percent. 

" " Champion, discount 50 per cent. 

" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's perdoz. 65 100 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4-in. style per doz. 6 50 

Common doors,2 or 3 panel, yellow and 

green siained, 4-in. style... .per doz. 6 75 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 

colors, oil finish per doz. 8 75 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 
Wood, F. H., bright and steel, discount 871 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H, bright, dis. 821 pei cent. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 80 per cent. 
" R. H., " dis. 75 per cent. 
' F. H., bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
' R. H., " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 874 per cent. 

Bench, wood per doz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Perdoz.net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, discou 

and 24 per cent. 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 674 

per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent . 

Cast iron, 16 x 24 85 

18x30 100 

18 x 36 1 40 

SNAPS. 

Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, 11-lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over •" 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493 perdoz. 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 to 60 and 5 per cent. 
Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 524 per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 124 Per cent, off re- 
vised litt. 
Ketinned. discount 75 per cent off revised list. 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIES. 

American discount 25 per cent. 

STO ME 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " 1^9 09 

Labrador " .... 13 

Axe " .... 0i: 

Turkey " .... 50 

Arkansas " 150 

Water-of-Ayr " .... 10 

Scythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind,2-in.,40to2001b.,perton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " .... 29 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7inch " " .... 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLISH. 

No. 4, 3 doz. in case, .net cash .... 4 80 
No. 6, 3 doz. in c ase. . " 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and i5 

tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

" } weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned— 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 124 aid 124 

" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 124 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet taens . 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 524 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

.Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers . . 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin per doz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

steel each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SUPS. 

Perdoz 3 00 15 00 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 and 10 
per cent. 

TRAPS (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N., P. S. & W., 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 724, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, discount 10 per cent. 

GermaD perdoz. 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 
TWINES. 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton. 3-ply 24 

• r " 4-ply 27 

Mattress per lb. 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 134 

Brook's 12j 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

r ' " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 00 

Columbia Hardware Co. 
Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

" parallel (discount) 45 per cent. 

61 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 
discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount 50 and 
10 per cent 

G X ni ,£? or J P , e „ arl - Im Penal, Crescent; discount 

50, 10 and 10 per cent. 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
" Star " decorated steel and decorated white 

25 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wire. 

No. 0-9 gauge $2 50 

}° " 6c. extra. 

" 12c. " 

}3 30c. " 

* 40c. " 

}5 ,. 55c. " 

16 70c. " 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 
Extra net per 100 lb. — Oiled wire 10c. 
spring wire 81.25, special hay baling wire 30c., 
best steel wire 75c., bright soft drawn 15c., 
charcoal (extra quality) #1.25, packed in casks 
or cases 15.., bagging and papering 10c., 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c., in 25-lb. bundles 
15c., in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in Mb. 
hanks, 50c., in J-lb. hanks 75c., in 1-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17. 
85-No. 18, 85.50-No. 19, 86-N0. 20, 86.65- 
No. 21, 87-No. 22, $7.30-No. 23, 87,65— No. 
24, 88-N0. 25, 89-No. 26, 89.50-No. 27, 
810-No. 28, $ll-No. 29, $12-No. 30, 813- 
No.31, 814— No. 32, 815-No. 33, 816-No. 34, 
117. Extras net— tinned wire, N08. 17-25. 
f2-Nos. 26-31, 84-Nos. 32-34, 86. Coppered, 
jc.— oiling, 10c.— in 25-lb. bundles,.15c— in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c. 
—in 4-lb. hanks, 38c— in }-lb. hanks, 50c— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c— bagging or 
papering, 10c. 
Brass wire, discount 60 per cent, off the list. 
Copper wire, discount 60 per cent, net cash 

30 days, f . 0. b factory. 
Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5. 
83.70 to 83.70-Nos. 6, 7, 8, 83.15 to 83 16 
-No. 9, 82.55 - No. 10, 83.20 to 83.20 
-No. 11, 83.25 to 83 25 -No. 12, 82 6 e 
-No. 13, 82.75-No. 14. 83.75 to83./5-No 
15, 84.30-No. 16. 84.30. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, 82.274 f.o.b. Cleveland. In carloti 
124c. less. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 Btrand, No. 17. 
84.65 ; No. 18. 82.90 ; No. 19, 82.60. Hollow 
6 strand, No. 17, 84.30 ; No. 18, 82 70 ; No 
19, 82.35; No. 20. 82.30, f.o b. Hamilton. 
Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb J 75 

Galvanized, plain twist 5 80 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, 82 55J in 
less than carlotB, and 82 45 in carlots. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9 $2 70 

No. 11 3 35 

No. 12 2 9& 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per lOOsq. ft., net. . 1 58 
Terms, 2 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASHING MACHINES. 

Round, re-acting, per doz 56 00 

Square " " 59 00 

Eclipse, per doz 48 00 

Dowswell " 36 00 

New Century, per doz 72 00 

WRINGERS. 

Leader perdoz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian ' — 24 00 

Royal American j — 24 00 

Sampson ' •••• *} JJ} 

Lightning ' .... 17 00 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 dart. 
WROUGHT IRON WASHERS. 
Canadian make, disoount 40 vt cent 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



Abbey Improved Chilled Shot Co 9 

Adams Co 49 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 48 

American Steel and Wire Co 8 

Atkins. E. C, k Co 57 

AtlasMfg. Co 53 

Barnett. G. & H. Co . . . . outside back cover 

Bartlett. Wm., k Son 62 

Barton-Gillette Horse Clipping Co 55 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co 49 

Baynes, Charles 53 

Bennett Mfg. Co 21 

Berry Bros 43 

Bird, J. A. & W., & Co 57 

Birkett. Thos..&SonCo 2 

Bliss, R., Mfg. Co 64 

Boker, H., & Co outside front cover 

Bradst reefs 64 

Canada Corundum Co 19 

Canada Foundry Co 19 

Canada Hardware Co 8 

Canada lion Furnace Co 33 

Canada Linseed Oil Mills 41 

Canada Metal Co 19 

Canada Paint Co 46 

Canada Paper Co 9 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co 7 

Canadian Rubber Co 1 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co 57 

Consolidated Plate Glass Co 45 

Consumers' Cordage Co 4 

Covert Mfg. Co 48 

Cullen.Orlan Clyde 64 

Cutts, C. M. & Co 53 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 49 

Dennis Wire and Iron Co 56 

Deseronf o Iron Co 33 

Dods, P. D., & Co 45 

Dominion Belting Co 21 

Dominion Radiator Co. outside front cover 



Dominion Wire Mfg Co 8 

Dundas Axe Works 9 

Erie Specialty Co 64 

Fairbanks Co 16 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co 48 

Gibb, Alexander 64 

Gillett, E. W., Co,, Ltd 51 

Greening, B., Wire Co 1 

Grose, Walter 34 

Grove Chemical Co 45 

Gurney Foundry Co 51 

Gurney Scale Co 55 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside back cover 

Hamilton Bridge Works Co 59 

Hamilton Cotton Co 19 

Hamilton Mica Rooting Co 57 

Hamilton Rifle Co 6 

Hamilton Steel and Iron Co 16 

Hanover Portland Cement Co 53 

Harrington k Richardson Arms Co ... . 21 

Heinisch, R., Sons Co 21 

Henderson k Potts Co 42 

Hobbs Mfg. Co 44 

Howland, H. S., Sons & Co 15 

Hyde, F. k Co 33 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 40 

Ironside. Son k Co 64 

Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle Works. . 14 

Ives, H. R. Co 57 

Jackson, C. F. & Co 33 

Jamieson, R. C, &Co 41 

Jardine, A. B., & Co 53 

Jenking, A. C 57 

Jones & Barclay 6 

Kemp Mfg. Co 10 

Kerr Engine Co 19 



Lamplough, F. W., & Co 16 

Leslie, A. C, & Co 33 

Lewis Bros. k Co 3 

Lewis, Rice, k Son inside front cover 

London Rolling Mill Co. inside back cover 

Lucas, John & Co 47 

Luf kin Rule Co inside back cover 

Luxfer Prism Co 47 

Lysaght, John outside front cover 



Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co 9 

Maxwell, D., k Sons 5 

Merrick, Anderson & Co 39 

Metallic Roofing Co 35 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co 56 

Millen, John, k Son 6 

Morrison, James, Brass Mfg. Co . 52 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co 34 

Morton, B. K., & Co 33 

Munderloh &Co 25 



McArthur, Alex., & Co 58 

McCaBkill, Dougall & Co 45 

McClary Mfg. Co 26 

McDougall, R., Co 33 

McGregor-Banwell Fence Co 9 

McNally, W., &Co 57 



Newman, W., & Sons 19 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 33 



Oakey, John, & Sons 21 

Oil and Colourman's Journal 48 

Oneida Community 8 

Ontario Silver Co 9 

Ontario Tack Co 12 

Ormsby, A. B., Co 56 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 9 



Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co 49 

Parsons-Irons Co 9 

Paterson Mfg. Co 60 

Pedlar People , 53 

Penberthy Injector Co 19 

Phillips, Chas. D 53 

Philip.David 34 

Pullman Mnfg. Co 19 

Queen City Oil Co 



5« 

Ramsay, A.. k Son 51 

Rogers, Henry, & Sons 53 

Russell k Erwin Mfg. Co 2 

Sadler k Haworth outside back cover 

Samuel, M. & L., Benjamin, & Co 2 

Seymour, Henry T., Shear Co 21 

Sharratt k Newth , 34 

Shaw, A., &Son 34 

Sherwin-Williams Co 13 

Smith, Hemenway & Co 34 

Solarine Metal Polish 45 

Spramotor Co 40 

Standard Paint and Varnish Works. .. 45 

Stephens, G. F., & Co .' 39 

St. George, H. E 40 

Sutherland, D 64 

Syracuse Smelting Works 21 

Taylor-Forbes Co 10 

Thompson, B. k S. H., Co. outside back cover 

Thome, R. E 45 

Union Metallic Cartridge Co 61 

United Factories 41 

Wallace Barnes Co 9 

Walter, E. F, & Co 5 

Western Foundry Co inside back cover 

Western Wire Nail Co 9 

White Mountain Freezer Co 26 

Wilcox Mfg. Co 5 

Wright, E. T., k Co 48 



This Awning 
is 50 ft. long. 
Has been used 
four seasons, 
and has need- 
ed no repairs. 

Our A wnings 
are the best 
made In 
Canada. 




The Awning on the Store Front of Ryrie Bros., the Largest Jewellery House in Canada. 



WemakeRoll- 
erA wnings for 
Store Fronts 
1 2 feet to 100 
feet, operated 
from one end, 
requiring 
only a boy's 
strength. 



WE MAKE AWNINGS TOR STORE ERONTS, MOUSES AND OFFICES. 

Exa'mples of work done in Toronto: Awnings used by GRAND k TOY, Stationers ; Walker k Co., Dry Goods; The Wm. Davies Co., Limited, Pro- 
visioners (we do all the work of this firm in Window Shades and Awnings— 37 Stores); The Nasmith Co., Limited, Caterers — 20 Branches. 

send for a quotation WILLIAM BARTLETT & SON, 1 6 Adelaide St. W., Toronto 



DOES ADVERTISING PAY? 

Hardware anc Metal, Toronto, Ont. Toronto, April 25, 1904. 

Gentlemen, — In renewing our advertising order for another year, permit us to say we have had excellent results from our quarter-column advertise- 
ment in your trade newspaper, Hardware and Metal. 

This is particularly encouraging when you take into account that the line we have been advertising (mantels) is an innovation in the hardware line and 
a good deal of our work has been pioneer and missionary in its character. 

We read Hardware and Metal each week, and as a subscriber of the paper almost since its inception, we have noted with great interest its 
growth and development. 

We have advertised in several papers, but may say we have got better results from our advertisement in Hardware and Metal than from any other 
medium. Looking back over the last few years we might say we have received on an average, at least, two inquiries per week from firms mentioning 
Hardware and Metal. 

Wishing Hardware and Metal continued prosperity, we beg to remain, • Yours very truly, 

The Batty Stove and Hardware Co., 
Per Wm. Batty. 

Yes, if in *' Hardware and Metal." 



62 



May 28, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Accountants and Auditors. 
Barber, Henry k Co., Toronto. 
•Fahty, Win., Toronto. 
Hoskms, David, Toronto. 
Jenkins & Hardy, Toronto. 
Kidd, 1<\ II., Toronto. 
Merson, Geo. O., Toronto. 
Williamson, T. G., Toronto. 

Anvils. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Out. 

Art Glass 

St. George, H. E., London, Out. 

Axes. Hatchets, Scythes, etc, 

American Axe and Tool Co., Montreal. 
Dundas Axe Works, Dundas, Ont. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co. , Montreal and Toronto. 
Langwells, Montreal. 
Syracuse Smelting Works, Montreal. 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Atwater, Duclos k Chauvin, Montreal. 
Beatty, Blackstock, Fasken & Kiddell, 

Toronto. 
Burritt, James H., K.C., Pembroke, Ont. 
Cameron, D. U., Toronto. 
Hamilton, J. C, Toronto. 
Tupper, Phippen k Tupper, Winnipeg. 
Vidal, I. L. U., Montmagny and Quebec. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Dominion Belting Co.. Hamilton. 
Gutta Peroha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Toronto. 
Pullman Mfg. Co., Rochester, N.Y. 
Sadler k Haworth, Montreal & Toronto. 

Bicycles and Sundries. 

MiUen, John, k Son, Montreal. 

Bird Cages. 

Wright, E. T, k Co., Hamilton. 

Box Straps. 

Warminton, J. N., Montreal, Que. 

Brass Goods. 

Jones k Barclay, Birmingham. 
Lewis Rice, & Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Nicklin, J., & Co., Birmingham, Eng. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Brushes and Brooms. 

United Factories, Toronto. 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies. 

Atkins, E. C, & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Baynes, Chas., Blackburn, Eng. 
Bliss, R., Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, R.I. 
Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Howland, H. S. Sons k Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 
Ives, H. R. Co., Montreal. 
Lamplough, F. W. Jit Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros, k Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
McNally, W„ k Co., Montreal. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 
Metal Shingle k Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Roofing Co. , Toronto. 
Newman k Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Ormsby, A. B., k Co., Toronto. 
Pedlar People, Oshawa, Ont. 
Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 
Stanley Rule k Level Co., New Britain. 

Conn. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
Wilcox Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 

Cash Registers. 

Hall wood Cash Register Co., Toronto. 
Churns. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co.,Nashua,N.H. 
Barton-Gillette Horse Clipping Co.. Lon- 
don, Eng. 
Boker, Henry, Montreal. 
Burman & Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 

Cordage. 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Corundum. 

Canada Corundum Co., Toronto. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissors, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co., Ottawa. 
Boker, Henry, Montreal. 
Butler, Geo., k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Lamplough, F. W., k Co., Montreal. 
Silberstein, A. L., New York. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Walter, E. F., 4 Co., Montreal. 
Wiebusch k Hilger, New York. 



Educational. 

Belleville Business College, Belleville 
Canadian Corr. College, Toronto. 
St. Margaret's College, Toronto. 
Willis Business College, Ottawa, Ont. 
Western Business College, Toronto. 

Electric fixtures. 

Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh k Co., Montreal. 

Elec tro-Pla ting. 

Sutherland, D., Toronto. 

Engra vers. 

I.egg Bros., Toronto. 
Smith, Geo. J., New York. 

Files and Rasps. 

Barnett Co., G. k H., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Financial Institutions. 

Bradstreet Co. 

British America Assurance Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto. 
Confederation Life Ass., Toronto. 
Liverpool & London & Globe Ins. Co., 

Toronto. 
London Guarantee and Accident Ins. 

Co., Toronto. 
Metropolitan Bank, Toronto. 
Western Assurance Co., Toronto. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Abbey Improved Chilled Shot Co., New- 
eastle-on-Tyne, Eng. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 

Harrington k Richardson Arms Co., 
Worcester, Mass. 

Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works, 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

Remington Arms Co., Ilion, N.Y. 

Savage Arms Co., Utica, N.Y. 

Union Metallic Cartridge Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Walter, E. F, k Co., Montreal. 

Flat Irons. 

Ives, H. R., Co., Montreal. 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lamplough, F. W., k Co., Montreal. 
Russell k Erwin Mfg. Co.. New Britain, 

Conn. 
Smith k Hemenway Co., New York. 

Gas Lamps and Sundries. 

Auer Light Co.. Montreal. 

Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Sharrett k Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., & Son, London, Eng. 

Glue. 

Grove Chemical Co., Lancashire, Eng. 

Gold Enamel. 

Ridout, Ge.o., k Co., Toronto. 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 
Horseshoe Pads. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails 

Canada Horse Nail Co. , Montreal. 
Peck Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Ice Cream Frcezeis. 

White Mountain Freezer Co., Nashua, 
N. H. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 

Keys. 

Millen, John k Son, Montreal. 

Lanterns. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Wright, E. T., k Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, David, k Sons, St. Marys Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Ledgers and Office Stationery. 

Briggs Ledger System Co., Toronto. 
Hart & Riddell, Toronto. 
Weese.G. A. k Son, Toronto. 

Lumbermen's Supplies. 

Birkett. Thos., & Sou Co., Ottawa. 
Wamock, Jas., k Co., Gait. 

Lve. 

Gillett, E. W., Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Machinery. 

Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Globe Brass Works, Detroit. 
Jardine, A. B., k Co., Hespt\er, Ont. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Morrow MachineSerewCo.,Ingersoll,Ont. 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., 

Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor. 



Mantels. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

M.uiitifc n tv r ^fs' Agents. 
Gibb, Alexander, Mo,.'-:'il 
Philip, David, Winnipeg. 

Metals. 

Booth Copper Co., Toronto. 
Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 
Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto', Ont. 
Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 
Ironside, Son k Co., London, Eng. 
Jackson, C. F., & Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Leslie, A. C. k Co., Montreal- 
London Rolling Mills Co., London, Ont. 
Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 
Morton, B. K.. & Co.. Sheffield, Eng, 
Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Peck Rolling Mills, Montreal. 
Rogers, Henry, Sons k Co., Montreal. 
Samuel, Benjamin k Co., Toronto. 
Thompson, B. k S. H. k Co., Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Metallic Rooting Co., Toronto, 
Pedlar People, Oshawa, Ont. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Falkiner, H. F. Toronto. 

Oakey, John, & Sons, London, Eng. 

Metallic Window Screens. 

Cutts, C. M., k Co., Toronto Junction. 

Milk Cans and Trimmings. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co., London, Out. 

Paints, Oils and Glass. 

Berry Bros., Detroit and Wallaoeburg. 
Canada Linseed Oil Mills, Montreal. 
Canada Paint Co., Montreal. 
Canadian Oil Co., Toronto. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto. 
Dods, P. D., k Co., Montreal. 
Francis-Frost Co. , Toronto. 
Henderson k Potts, Montreal and 

Halifax. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. C, & Co., Montreal. 
Lucas, John, &Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Corneille k Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill, Dougall & Co., Montreal. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 
Nobles & Hoare, London, Eng. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay k Son, Montreal. 
Ridout, Geo., & Co., Toronto. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works, 

Windsor, Ont. 
Stephens, G. F., &Co., Winnipeg. 
Thome, R. E., Montreal. 

Patent Solicitor. 
Cullen, Orlan Clyde, Washington, D.C. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Supplies. 

Jardine, A. B., k Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass .\Jfg. Co., Toronto. 

Portland Cement. 

Hanover Portland Cement Co., Han- 
over, Ont. 
Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 
McNally, W., k Co., Montreal. 
Thompson, B. k S. H. & Co., Montreal. 

Radiators, Furnaces, Stoves, 
Tinware, etc. 

Adams Co., Dubuque, Iowa. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Dominion Radiator Co., Toronto, Ont. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co., Toronto. 
Merrick, Ander on _i Co., Winnipeg. 
Western Foundry Co., Wingham. 
Wright, E. T.,& Co., Hamilton. 

Refrigerators. 

Davidson, Thns., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Roofing Supplies. 
Bird. J. A & W., & Co., Boston. 
Hamilton Mica Roofing Co., Hamilton. 
Jenking, A. C, Montreal. 
Lockerby & McComb. Montreal. 
McArthur, Alex.. & Co., Montreal 
Metal Shingle & Siding Co. .Preston, Out. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Ormsby, A. B., k Co., Toronto. 
Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto k Montreal. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Sales. 

Taylor, J. k J., Toronto. 

Saws 

Atkins, E. C, &Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Gu.-ney Scale Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 



Screen Doors and Windows. 

United Factories, Toronto. 

Screws, Nuts, Bolts. 

Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co., 
Ingersoll, Ont. 

Sewci Pipe^. 

Canadian Sewel :',■■ Co., Hamilton. 
Hyde, F., k Co., Montreal. 
McNally & Co., Montreal. 

ShelfBoxes. 

Bennett Mfg. Co., Pickering, Ont. 

Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven, Conn. 
Grand River Metal Works, Gait, Ont. 

Ship Chandlery. 

Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toionto. 

Silver-Plated Ware. 

Ontario Silver Co., Niagara Falls. 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Toronto. 
Standard Silver Co., Toronto. 

Spramotors. 

Spramotor Co., London, Ont. 

Sporting Goods. 

Lewis, Rice, k Son, Toronto. 
Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. 

Springs. 

Wallace, Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn. 

Stamps, Stencils, etc. 

Parsons-Irons Co., Toronto. 

Steel Castings. 

Hamilton Bridge Works, Hamilton. 
Hamilton Steel and Iron Co., Hamilton. 
Montreal Steel Works, Montreal. 

Steel Rails. 

Jackson, C. F., & Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Morton, B. K, k Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel k Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stock Food. 

Colonial Stock Food Co., Toronto. 
International Stock Food Co., Toronto. 

Store Lighting. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Structural Iron and Steel Work. 

Hamilton Bridge Works Co., Hamilton. 

Tents, Awnings, etc. 

Bartlett, Wm., k Son, Toronto. 

Toasters 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Harkins k Willis, Ann Arbor, Mich. 

Traps 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. 

Vises. 

Lamplough, F. W., k Co., Montreal. 

Wall Paper. 

Staunton's Limited, Toronto. 

Warehouse Trucks. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
. Slingsby, H. C, Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., k Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Bowman, John, Hardware k Coal Co 

Loudon, Ont. 
Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. S., Sons k Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros, k Co., Montreal. 
Lewis. Rico, k Son, Toronto. 
Merrick, Anderson k Co., Winnipeg. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

American Steel and Wire Co., New 

York, Montreal, Chicago. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Ironside, Son k Co., London, Eng. 
London Fence Machine Co., London. Ont. 
McGregor - Banwell Fence Co., Windsor, 

Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 
Oneida Community, Niagara Falls. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen Sound 
Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Peck Rolling Mills Co . Montreal. 
Walter. E. F. * Co., Montreal. 
Western Wired Nail Works, London, Ont. 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co.', Guelph, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 

Mi- Arthur, Alex., & Co., Montreal. 



63 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



May 28, 1904 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to berepresentedin Canada. 



Orlan Clyde Cullan.G.t.L.L.M. 

Counsellor atLaw'U.S. Supreme Court. 
Registered Attorney U.S. Patent Office, 

U.S. and Foreign Patents, Caveats, Copy- 
rights and Trade Marks. Military and 
Naval Inventions a specialty. Address, 

Box 264, Station G, Washington, DX. 

CUN SHOP and MODEL SHOP 

Warren While iulphur Springs, 

Totten P.O., Virginia. 



^WWW^VWrVWWr>^r V | 

Fine Metal Finishes 
on Builders' Hardware. 

I do much fine work of this sort for lead- 
ing jobbers and manufacturers. 
Have you ever work of this sort to give 
out? Write me. 

D.SUTHERLAND 

Electro-Plater, 
112 Church Street, - - TORONTO 



IRONSIDE FOR IRON 

mggSfflffiBR IRON, STEEL, METALS, BARS, PLATES, 
SHEETS. BOLTS and NUTS, TIN PLATES, Etc. 

Sole Licencees for PAGE'S PATENT WIRE STRETCHER, and we 

are willing to sell the right of manufacture in Canada on a Royalty basis. 

IRONSIDE'S PATENT WIRE CUTTERS, guaranteed to cut any wire 

We publish a "Canadian Metal Price List" monthly. Quotations In Dollars and Cents. 
(C.I.F.) We will send this, and our "Weekly Market Report" on reoelpt of address. 

IRONSIDE, SON & CO., MB* London, Eng 




73 YEARS 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



73 YEARS 



Want Ads. 



In this paper cost 2 cents per word first 
insertion, 1 cent per word subsequent in- 
sertions. Contractions count as one word, 
but five figures (such as $1,000) may pass 
as one word. Cash remittance to cover 
cost must in all cases accompany orders, 
otherwise we cannot insert the advertise- 
ment. When replies come in our care 5 
cents additional must be included for for- 
warding same. Many large business deals 
have been brought about through adver- 
tisements of 20 or 30 words. Clerks can be 
secured, articles sold and exchanged, at 
small expenditure. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 
Montreal and Toronto. 



CHAS. F. CLARK, President. 



CHAS. L. BECKWITH, Secretary. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus. 81,500,000. Offices Throughout the CivUized World. 

Executive Offioes : Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New Tork City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeser o mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the 
civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence* Invited. 

OFFICES IN CANADA 



HALIFAX, N 8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. LONDON, ONT. 

QDEBEC, QUE. ST. JOHN, N.B, 

WINNIPEG, MAN. 

TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen. Man. Western Canada. Toronto. 



MONTREAL, QDK. 
TORONTO, ONT. 



' 



SEVERALOTHERSTYLES ILLUSTRATED IN OUR NEW CATALOGUE 



.,?■« ' 



Jk. 



MADE OF CRUCIBLE STEEL. OIL TEMPERED. ANTI-RUST. NICKEL PLATED. 
W I LL N OT ^B END, B R E AK OR RUST. EACH ONE TESTED AND GUARANTEED. 

r f % nuDAkiv Pdit Da 
VU M KAN Y, CKIL. rA 



64 




Bars in Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half Ovals, Half-Roundsand 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

GOOD QUALITY. PROHPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 






MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Iss Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc, 

ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 

New York City Branch— 280 Broadway. 

For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



'QUALITY FIRST AND ALWAYS. 




FAME 



The Huron Fam e 

is the handsomest and most modern 
iry DUA OlUYCL on the market. 



[as : — 
ixtra large feed door opening. 

Draw-out hearth slide. 

Commodious swinging top with covers over center. 

Mounted without the use of rods, allowing free expan- 
sion and contraction of the castings, preventing the 
liability of cracking. 

Body and top ornamented, making a new and 
pleasing effect. 

It is moderate in price. 



List Prices : $10.00, $13.00, $17.50. 

Send for Discounts. Our Stove Catalogue on Request. 

The Western Foundry Co., Limited, 



WINGHAM, 



ONT. 




\ Black Diamond File Works 

6. & H. Barnett Company 






Est. 1868. 




Inc. 1895. 



Twelve ^ 



PHILADELPHIA 

M ^ K Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 







i 
\ 



>+s%sm^%^^ r +s*%^+ / ***v%'<m^w%^±' 



" Redstone " 
Sheet Packing. 

For use in highest pressures for 
Steam, hot or cold Water and 
Air. Packs equally well for all. 
No trouble with leaky joints 
when they are packed with 
"REDSTONE." The most 
satisfactory packing on the 
market. Try a sample lot and 
be convinced of its merits. 

Manufactured solely by 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Temporary Offices: 

15 East Wellington Street, Toronto. 

Branches— MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



PORTLAND CEMENT 



For import orders we are now prepared 
to quote prices for^-^B**"*- 

Best English Cement, "White's" 
Best German Cement 
Best Belgian Cement 
Natural Belgian Cement 

In Barrels or Sacks 



B.& S.H.THOMPSON & CO. 

LIMITED 

53 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 



SmERftflAWeRTH 



Crown Brand 
Lace Leather. 



This is a LACE that we 
can recommend to anybody 
who is having trouble in 
getting something good. 

Sold by the Side and in 
bundles of J 00 feet. 



Montreal, Toronto. 



Classified List of Advertisements on page 67. 



STERLING VALUE 
LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL 



HARDWARE-METAL 

AND CANADIAN MACHINIST 

y\ WeeKly Newspaper devoted to tHe Hardware, Metal, Machinery, 
Heating and Plumbing Trades in Canada. 



VOL XVI 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO. JUNE 4. 1904. 



NO. 23 




^ CUTLERY? 



FOk SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



FLEUR DE LIS ' GALVANIZED IRON 



FLEUR AOE LIS. 




First quality, low price, every sheet guaranteed. 



JOHN LTSAOHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, END Managers Canadian Branch 




Before placing your orders 
elsewhere, secure our 



New Prices 



on- 



IRON PIPE, BLACK AND 

GALVANIZED. 
CAST FITTINGS. 
MALL FITTINGS. 
GALVANIZED FITTINGS. 
HEADERS. 
BRASS VALVES. 
IRON BODY VALVES. 
STEAM SPECIALTIES AND 
ENGINEERS' SUPPLIES. 

Large Stock. Prompt Shipment. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO. 

Limited 

Head Office and Works -Oufferin St., TORONTO. 

Branches— Montreal, Quebec, St. John, N.B, 
Winnipeg, and Vancouver, B. C. 




OUTDOOR 

SPORTING GOODS 



Baseball Goods. 

GLOVES 

BATS 

BALLS 

MASKS 

ETC. 



ENGLISH 



AND 



GET 
TAYLOR' S SCOTCH 

LAWN BOWLS 

FULL STOCK 
ALWAYS ON HAND. 



Golf Supplies. 

DRIVERS 
BRASSIES 
LOFTERS 
CLEEKS, ETC. 






AMERICAN 

TENNIS 
RACKETS. 



ALL 

NEW GOOD* 




xuf;ned return 



B A 



"nncft iwy- 




mm**.. £&&*. 



m ^JJ2 + ml* 




INFIELDERS' GLOVES. 



MASKS 



CATCHERS' MITTS. 



WRITE FOR TRADE PRICES. 

RICE LEWIS 




LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



Tennis Goods, 
Tennis Balls, 

Nets, 

Tennis 

Markers, 

Etc. 



ALL KINDS 

SPORTING GOODS 

IN STOCK. 



RETUKNhU 




FIELDERS' GLOVES. 



SON. 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALWAYS 
READY 
FOR USE 




No Honing ! No Grinding ! 

No Smarting after Shaving. With ordinary careful use will 
KEEP AN ED6E FOR YEARS WITHOUT HONING. 



Booklet coming — if you will ask for a copy, with trade discount. 
FOR SALE BY LEADING JOBBERS. 
FIRM OF „/■/ 

A. L. SILBERSTEIN, A J 

MAKERS OF ' O 
459-461 BROADWAY, NEW YORK 



Cutlery 



THE CANADIAN RUBBER CO. 

of Montreal. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



G 



Rubber Belting, 
Hose, Packing, 
Valves, Gaskets, 



ETC, ETC. 



We make a specialty of 

HORSE SHOE PADS 

the best in the market. 



Write for Prices and Circulars. 



Head Office : : MONTREAL 

BRANCHES-TORONTO, WINNIPEG and VANCOUVER 



Lightning, Gem 
Blizzard . . . 



FREEZERS 






ARE 

Well Advertised. 
In Demand. 
Easily Sold. 
Satisfactory in Use. 
( )f Known Reputation. 



HAVE 

Cedar Pails with Electric Welded Wire Hoops. 
Cans of Heavy Tin with Drawn Steel Bottoms. 
AUTOMATIC' Twin Scrapers. 
"The Ice ('ream Freezer Book" tells all about 
these and our other Freezers, mailed free. 



EXCEL IN 



Easy Running. 
Quick Freezing. 
Economy. 
Convenience. 
Practical Results. 



North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philad ,! e fi a ' Pa ' 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



LIMITED 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

LIMIT 

Wholesale Hardware Merchants, 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



^ 







In introducing 

The 

Universal 
Bread 
Maker 

we do so with confidence, 
knowing it will do all that 
is said of it. 

To mix and knead 
bread in 3 minutes may 
seem extravagant, but it 
is a fact 

Here is a 



MIXER, KNEADER and RAISER 

ALL IN ONE. 

The old and disagreeable task of Bread-making is done away with. 
We shall be pleased to send booklets for your customers, and give prompt 
attention to your sample order. 



Z*&^? 



DELIGHTED 

Bridget will be delighted 
with the Russwin Food 
Cutter. It makes her work • 
easier, pleasanter — gives 
widest scope to her skill, 
and does most in least time. 
Just try it. For sale evecy- 
where. Made by 

RUSSELL & ERWIN MFG. CO. 
NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



-FOR SALE BY— 

The KENNEDY HARDWARE CO , Limited 

49 Colborne St., TORONTO, ONT. 



We have now in stock a full line of the following : ) 

GALVANIZED SHEETS, TIN PLATES, 

BLACK SHEETS, CANADA PLATES, 

TINNED SHEETS, ZINC SHEETS, 

IMITATION RUSSIAN IRON, COPPER SHEETS, 
IRON PIPE, BRASS SHEETS, 

IRON and STEEL HOOPS. 

METALS, ANTIMONY, COPPER, TIN, LEAD. ZINC, 
PROMPT SHIPMENT. PRICES RIGHT. 



M. & L. Samuel, Benjamin & Co 



503 Temple Building 

English House— 16 Philpot Lane, LONDON, ENGLAND. 



TORONTO. 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



The 
Better Class. 

Competition is a great game if you are the winner, 
or, it may be better for you if you are not in it at all. It gen- 
erally means cutting prices and throats too; — and you know there is no 
money in that. Again, it's the price of every-day goods that suffers — goods that can 
m ^ mm be bought by almost every store in town, if they have a mind to buy ^^^™ 




them. Then why not get away from the common class of goods and stock lines that make 
business worth while. We know what we are saying, and if you do, you will pay more 
attention to the better class of goods. 




LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



QUOTE 
LOW 



SHIP 
QUICK 



IMPORTERS AND DISTRIBUTORS. 



Address all Correspondence to 



TORONTO, 
87 York St. 



OTTAWA, 

54 Quesn St. 



VANCOUVER, 
141 Water St. 



MONTREA 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



»^^ l ^^ I ^^ I ^^ ^ ^ H ^^ ; ^^ I ■^ I ^^ I ^^ ^ ■ I ^■ ^ ^ l ^^ ^ ^ ^ ^ l ^^ ^ ^ ^ ■ l ^^ l ^^ ! ^^ ^ ^ l ^^ ^ ^ I ^^ ^ ^I^^ ^ a^^ I ^■ ^a ^^^4~HH^^~^»H^^H 



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4. 



•I* 
* 
f 

T 

*j 



T 
I 



J. 

* 

? 
I 

I 
v 

I 
? 

X 
X 



Cordage 

Of every description. 

INIet Mountings, 

Sand Line, 

vJnoiled Cordage, 

IVlarline, 

Extra Long Lengths, 

Ratline, 

Shingle Yarn. 

Core Rope, 

Oil Well Cables, 

Russian Packing, 

Deep Sea Lines, 

Anchor Line, 

Good Transmission Rope, 

Engine Packing. 

Clothes Lines, 

Only Best Material Used. 



* 



Mail 

Orders 
Now 

lo us and 

Receive 

Exceptional 

Attention. 

Low-priced goods are not always 
the cheapest. 



Log Line 

Twine. 
Dangerous to use Inferior Cordage. 

:^" 1 " 1 " | " 1"I " 1 " I"I " I-I " I " I " 1 " I " I " I " 1"M " M '- I " 1 I 1 M 1" 1 " I " 1 - 1 "I- - I - I - I - I ■ 1 »I- I "1"I" 1 "1" I"I " I " I "I" I "1" 1 " I " I "I "I " I"I"I"I"I"I"I"I " I " I - I"I " I " I - 1 -- 






June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



rue: brand ou 



RY 



POCKET CUTLERY 

GUARANTEED QUALITY. 







RAZORS 
SCISSORS 



BEST GOODS 



RIGHT PRICES 



E. F. WALTER & CO., 



166 and 168 

McGill St. 



Montreal 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ ♦++++++♦+♦♦+++++++ f ++ ++++++++ + ♦ ♦ » ♦ t f ♦ +++++< 



^+++++++++++ 



WILCOX MFG. CO. OF ONTARIO, Limited 



HEAD 
OFFICE 



LONDON, ONT. 



Door Hangers of every description, Automatic Fire Door 
I Equipments, Overhead Trolley Carrying Systems, Velox 
I Ball-Bearing Grindstones, Velox Bail-Bearing Emery 
X Grinders, Triumph Wire Stretchers, Sash Weights. 

X WRITE FOR PRICES 

♦+++++++++++++++-H~f++++* ♦♦»♦♦♦♦ ♦♦♦♦♦++♦♦♦♦+♦+♦♦♦♦♦< 



FACTORIES : 



AURORA, III. 

ST. THOMAS, Out. 

HAMILTON, Out. 




*£ Australasian ** 
Hardware and Machinery, 

The Organ of the Hardware, Machinery 
and Kindred trades of the Antipodes. 

SUBSCRIPTION $1.25 PER ANNUM, 



Fink's Buildings. 
- Post Office Chamber*, 



post free to any part of the world 

PUBLISHING! OFFICES: 

Melbourne 
Sydney, 
BRITISH OFFICES : 

London, - - 42 Cannon St., EC. 

CANADIAN AND AMERICAN ENQUIRIES will receive prompt 
attention if addressed to the LONDON OFFICE, 42 CANNON 
STREET, E.C. 

Specimen Copies Free on Application. 



Have you any call 

for Brass 
Stamped 



MAKERS 



'IN 



GY# 



Labels ? 



We make these goods in all sizes and design 
to order. Let us have your enquiries for stamper 
brass goods such as : 

Curtain Rings and Hooks, 
Mill Band Fasteners, etc. 

We will be glad to quote for special 
lines or submit samples of regular line?. 

-tEGISTL -F r, 

LOOK FOR (SAJONIC jTHIS TRADE MARK 

T "ADE MARK 

J. Nichlin CgL Co. 

Birming'Kam, Eng'. 




Canadian Agent : 

F. P. ROGER 
Cttrlaw Bldg. Toronto 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 




Just like fishing 

Building up trade is just like 
fishing. 

If you use the rig'r.t kind of 
bait and cast your line where the 
kind of fish you want are most 
plentiful, you'll quite likely get a 
number of bites. 

Then if you go about it right 
you are pretty sure to land most 
of them. 

Apply the illustration to busi- 
ness. 

If you want to catch the 
hardware trade cast your line 
where all the good hardware 
merchants in Canada congregate 
every week — looking for bait to 
build up their businesses with — in 
Hardware and Metal. But 

Suppose results don't come at fust 

What be yew goin' tux dew? 
Take out yewr ad, and kick yewrself, 

An' go ter feelin' blew? 
Uv course yew hain t ; yew re goin' tew fish, 

An' bait an' bait again ; 
Bimeby some nibbles 'n bites 11 come, 

Then yew'll pull em in. 

Our Department of Advertising 
Service is now providing good 
bait for a number of our adver- 
tisers — and stands ready to help 
a few more in this connection. 

Drop us a line about it. 



Hardware and Metal 



io Front St. E. 
Toronto. 



232 ncam St. 
Montreal 




Always Salable 

The 

Gait Carpet Stretcher 



Will not tear the finest carpet. riETURNEi. 
The Simplest, most Effective ..... a a iQQi/ 



Stretcher made. 



SEND FOR BOOKLET. 



Grand River Metal Works, 



jzeparrme/)/- of rfc/ve>'/-/5/i<? 5err/c£ -— . 



Gait, - Ont. 



Limited 



*ETU|KNED 



Lawn Shavers 



This is the season of the year when the 
grass needs shaving. We can supply you 
with the most up-to-date Lawn Shavers in 
existence. The 



Perfection 

Lawn Mower 

is just a little 
ahead of any- 
thing on the 
market to-day. 






JUL 35 lS*f 




190 n The material used is of the highest quality 

■/,%.[ only. The adjustment is easy and accurate. It 

<r cuts smoothly, runs easily, and will stay sharp 

a long time. In fact, it is the ideal Lawn 

Mower. Order a few and be convinced. All 

sizes in stock. 

The Fisk & Jay Grass Trimmer needs 

no words to explain its use. It sells on sight. 
Let us send you a few with your order for 
Mowers. Prices are right. 

ORDERS SHIPPED SAME DAY AS RECEIVED. 



John Bowman Hardware & Coal Co, 

LONDON, CANADA. 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canadian Cordage 

& MFG. Co., Limited. 

BINDER TWINE. 






"ROYAL" MANILA, 650 ft. to the pound. 
" ROYAL " MANILA, 600 ft. to the pound. 
'* ROYAL " MANILA, 550 ft. to the pound. 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 500 ft. to the pound. 
STANDARD, - 500 ft. to the pound. 
SISAL, - - 500 ft. to the pound. 

Our " ROYAL " Brand of Binder Twine is manufactured of the finest raw material 
that can be obtained, and with the utmost care. For length and strength we have no com- 
petitors. Our twine is manufactured with the latest machinery, and dealers desiring to have 
exclusive agencies should apply at once. 

Write, Wire or 'Phone. 



CANADIAN CORDAGE & MFC. CO., Limited 

Peterborough, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



SHOT. 

In ordering, pleaae specify The Abbey Im- 
proved Chilled Shot Co., Ltd., New- 
cast I e-on-Tyne. 

N.B.— We also make Hard and Soft Shot but 
strongly recommend Improved Chilled Shot for 
penetration. 

N.B.— The only Company in Great Britain de- 
voting its whole time to Shot making. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 



Limited, 

NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

M „,„f,,i„ rorc „f FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 
manufacturers or ELECTRO PLATE 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



DifluS Axe Works 

Dundas, Canada. 

\ Write for Prices 

) P. BERTRAM, - Managei . 





Steel Stamps 



For Manufacturers of 
MACHINERY and METALWARE 

All our work is guaranteed to be satisfactory. 



THE PARSONS-IRONS CO. 

58 Adelaide St. W., • TORONTO. 



Your Customers 

the farmers are looking for a fence, strong, 
serviceable and durable at a reasonable 
cost. You can supply it to them in the 




It is strictly up-to-date and the best value 
to be had in wire fencing to-day. 

A GOOD SELLER 

We have a style for every purpose in either 
heavy or light fencing. Write for cata- 
logue showing fencing and gates. 

CoiledSpring Wire 

unexcelled in quality, shipped promptly 
THE 

McGregor=Banwell Fence Co. 



Limited 
Walkerville, Ont. 

MERRICK. ANDERSON ft CO , Winnipeg 

Sole Agents for Manitoba andN. W. T. 



WATERPROOF WRAPPING PAPER 

For Express and Long Distance Packages. Put up in rolls 36 in. wide, 250 and 
300 yards in a roll. Clean paper on both sides— waterproof substance in the 
centre— therefore it will not soil or stain delicate goods, as ordinary waterproof 
paper will. Practically odorless. May be used /->«»,.-.. rwnrvr-n f* % 
either for case lining or wrapping packages. vAN/\DA PAPER CO. 
samples and prices with pleasure Toronto limited Montreal 



I 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK ;»»« ""'■"■">■"■"' "°«" <■» wi. e 

FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING. 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO., Limited, 



LONDON. ONT 




" Little Shaver " 



Canadian Agents : 

E. H GRENFELL & CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



Cutest Thing in the Kitchen 

Shaves chocolate so thin that it dissolves without stirring. 
Slices Potatoes, Radishes, Cucumbers, Onions, Apples and 
all the smaller fruits and vegetables 
Made of black walnut. 
Knife is fine tempered steel. 

MADE ONLY BY 

J. M. /WAST MFG. CO.. Lititz. Pa. 




FLAT— SPIRAL or V0LUT6 



INTERESTING CATALOG MAILED ON APPLICATION 

THE WALLACE BARNES CO. 

BRISTOL CONN. 



DILLON FENCING 



THE HINGE IS COMPLETE, AND 
WORKS WITH THE UTMOST 
FREEDOM. 




CAVERHILL, LEARMONT & CO., Agents 

at Montreal and Winnipeg. 



Sold to the trade only. 



Manufactured and sold by 

OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., Limited 

Owen Sound, Ont. 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




ONEIDA 

COMMUNITY'S 

WELDLESS 

COW TIES. 



Illustration shows the 

WIRE 
LINK 



§ NIAGARA 

OPEN RING TYPE. 



Also made in CLOSED RING, THREE CHAIN 
and DOniNION (or « Short") TYPES. 

Oneida Community Cow Ties can be had of all 
the leading jobbers. We invite correspondence 
where any difficulty is experienced in obtaining 
our goods. 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



STEEL WIRE NAILS 

FOR ALL PURPOSES. 

A large quantity of 

STANDARD SIZES in Stock 

WOOD SCREWS, 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS, 

WIRE STAPLES. 



WIRE 



OF ALL KINDS 

AND 
FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



COPPER WIRE 

for 
TROLLEY - TELEGRAPH - TELEPHONE 
and 
TRANSMISSION LINES 

Manufactured by 

DOMINION WIRE MFG. CO. 

MONTREAL and TORONTO 



LIMITED 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 

WIRE CLOTH 

Special Re galvanized Cloth for Apple and 




Fruit Drying. 



Stock widths, 24, 30 and 36 in. 

Other widths and meshes made to order. 



Also l /2 in. Galvanized /Setting. 



Stock widths, 24, 30 and 36 in. 
Stock lengths, 25 and 50 yards. 



Also Wire Cloth and Netting, for all purposes. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 



Hamilton, Ont. 



Montreal, Qo< 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



After it 
is Sold 

-Which Mower will do 
you most good ? 

That is the question. 




Taylor- 
Forbes 

Lawn Mowers 

is the answer to the 
question. 



Taylor-Forbes Lawn Mowers are guaranteed broadly. They are examples of the best 

material and workmanship. They can be supplied with parts quickly and at minimum expense. 

They are made in Canada. They are distinctly better than imported mowers. They can be had 
without delays. 

ORDER FROM YOUR JOBBER. SEND FOR CATALOGUE " B." 

THE TA YLOR-FORBES CO., Limited 



Montreal Branch : 

9 De Bresoles St 



GUELPH, CANADA. 

The largest manufacturers of Hardware in Canada. 



Kemp's Cold Blast Lanterns 

The success which our Lantern has achieved is largely demonstrated 
by the points of superiority that it possesses. 

A Combination Lift and Hinge Lantern. 

It is easily adjusted. 

Its burning qualities are unexcelled— 

WILL NOT BLOW OUT. 

WILL NOT SMOKE. 

WILL NOT LEAK. 

WILL NOT BREAK GLOBES. 

If your customers desire such a lantern, sell 
them ours. 




THEY DO NOT COST MORE T HAN OTHER MAKES 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CAN. 



10 



June 4, 1904 



Hardware and Metal 



MAINLY ABOUT OURSELVES 



A Personal 

Talk by 
I he Editor 




XPANSION has been the 
watchword of Hardware and 
Metal for some time. Some 
time ago, while in an East- 
ern Ontario town, the writer 
heard the history of a comparatively 
young hardware firm, a story that was 
as inspiring as it was educative. Two 
young men had started in business in a 
moderate way, a dozen or so years ago. 
They had worked like beavers until they 
had the largest retail trade in their 
town, and their customers were num- 
bered for many miles through the sur- 
rounding country. What seemed the 
natural limitations of their business had 
been reached. Yet their ambitions were 
not satisfied ; they felt the capacity for 
wider activities. So, instead of settling 
down to enjoy the comparatively easy 
life of prosperous retail merchants, they 
expanded, first adding a machine shop, 
and later a foundry to the establish- 
ment. Now, what seemed to be the 
final development of their business ap- 
pears to be merely the beginning, and 
what further extension may be made 
is quite beyond calculation; can only be 
measured by the continuity of the enter- 
prise that has marked their efforts up 
to the present. 

Do you now understand how inspir- 
ing the details of such a business story 
would be to one whose life is devoted 
to the study of trade problems, and 
who is ever on the alert for any sugges- 
tion that may be of value to his clients, 
his constituency ? 

If some of the hardware retail- 
ers of Canada could know the men- 
tal processes that have caused the own- 
ers of this firm to keep pressing on, and 
on and on. to continue expansion after 
expansion, they would find inspiration 
for the months of possible toil and 
worry that lie before them. Hard work 
and a steady onward pressure will bring 
their own rewards. But why do we not 
tell this story ? We hope to some day. 
* # * 

But in what way does all this concern 
the management of Hardware and 
Metal ? In a most direct and vital man- 
ner. We preach expansion; we advo- 



cate it for the retailers, the jobbers, the 
manufacturers of Canada. To advocate 
it honestly we must believe in it ; we do. 
And the belief in it is not limited to a 
confidence in its efficacy for the retail- 
er or the manufacturer, but also for our- 
selves. 

Hardware and Metal to-day includes 
among its subscribers almost every 
hardware dealer of any account from 
the Atlantic to the Pacific — except in 
some parts of Quebec. We have the 
great bulk of the best Quebec hard- 
waremen, but not all, as in the other 
provinces. We have the great major- 
ity of the plumbers of the Dominion. 
During recent years we have paid much 
attention to the machinists and foun- 
drymen, and have been able to build up 
a strong connection in this constituency. 

It is the policy of Hardware and 
Metal to secure circulation first, count- 
ing on the advertising (which is ad- 
mittedly the bone and sinew of a trade 
paper) to follow in due time. A glance 
through this and recent issues will show 
our readers how we have continued to 
devote much attention to our machinery 
and foundry readers, although we have 
not been supported by machinery adver- 
tisers . 

Why have we done this ? Be- 
cause we desired to hold and add to our 
connection with machinery buyers. We 
have been successful in this respect, and 
now we intend making an effort to con- 
vince machine-tool manufacturers of 
the value of Hardware and Metal as a 
medium for advertising their lines to 
machinists and foundrymen. This is the 
chief thought in our expansion policy 
(as it concerns ourselves). We feel con- 
fident that we will receive every assist- 
ance in this matter from our readers. 
If we do, the success of our efforts is 

assured . 

* * * 

Yet, while we intend to continue de- 
voting much time and space to our 
machinery department, hardware deal- 
ers can depend that we shall not 
neglect their interests. In this issue 
will be found some valuable sugges- 



tions on window display and on adver- 
tising, while other departments in the 
paper will be found fully up to the 
mark. We are proud of the manner 
in which the retail hardware trade have 
stood by us year after year. What- 
ever expansion, whatever development 
the years may bring, the hardwareman 
shall never be neglected, nor his inter- 
ests lost sight of. 

* * * 

Eastern Canada is destined to become 
an industrial country, just as the East- 
ern United States have become indus- 
trially strong. If Hardware and Metal, 
through the suggestions in its news col- 
umns, by its weekly reports on trade 
conditions and its market quotations on 
the necessary materials, can assist the 
hardwareman to get the largest possible 
share of the rewards of this industrial 
activity, it will be fulfilling a 
destiny worthy of any news- 

paper, quite in keeping with the 
purpose of a trade paper. We 
would like to hear of hardwaremen in 
all sections of the country branching 
out— expanding in one way or another. 
One may add tinsmithing, furnace work, 
etc. If he does, he should not be con 
tent until he can figure on heating every 
building that goes up in his district, 
whether it be by hot air, hot water or 
steam. Another may add plumbing. If 
he does, he should not be content until 
he can estimate properly on the largest 
jobs that may ever be within his reach. 
A third may, like the firm referred to 
above, add a machine shop or foundry. 
These offer the greatest possibilities, 
especially in a country the industrial 
future of which is as promising as in 
( lanada. 

When we recommend expansion. 
however, we have not in mind any 
cut-price or get-rich-quick plan 
— the thought is the development of the 
best system, stocking the best range of 
goods in the most attractive manner; in 
short, building up a sound, growing 
business by the most modern methods, 
the chief of which is steady, hard work. 



11 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



AN EXPANDING HARDWARE FIRM. 



OX the Brsl of June the style of 
Dodd & Rogers, wholesale and re- 
tail bardwaremen; Charlottetown, 
P. K. I., was changed to The Rogers 

Hardware Co., Ltd. The capital of the 
company is placed at $2(10. 000. under the 
control of the Rogers family, Benjamin 
Rogers, sf., being president, and Ben- 
jamin Rogers, jr.. secretary-treasurer of 
the company. 

Dodd & .tube's were one of the old 
i-st hardware linns on Prince Edward 
Island. Mr. Rogers started with the 
firm when a lad nf seventeen, and after 
four and a-half years was admitted to 
partnership. The business has steadily 
grown. In 1867 the expansion made it 
necessary for them to move from a 
small store on Pownal street to the pres- 
ent premises, which has since been en- 
larged to meet trade requirements. 
Twelve yen's ago Mr. Dodd retired » : s « I 
.Mr. Rogers assumed full control id' the 
business. 

In 1899 an annex was completed 
which gave the premises an area of 140x 
40 feet. It has now been necessary, 
however, to add another store, so the 
lirm bought the Medical Hall corner. It 
runs back 140 feet and has a frontage 
id' forty feet on Queen street. The 
store on the lower floor is at present 
occupied by .J. (!. Jamieson, but the 
upper storeys aid an apartment in : : '" 
rear ha-ve been under rent to Dodd & 
Rogers for some years past. 

The corner building does not run so 
far back as the other, ami has in its 
reai- a vacant lot 40x00. On this site 
the Rogers Hardware Co. will have 
their new office, it being necessary to 
erect two walls only. The office will 
have its entrance on Grafton street. It 
will be thoroughly up-to-date in struc- 
ture, design and appointments. The. 
bottom of each window will l)e six feet 
above the floor, ami the top just below 
the eaves. The furniture will be id' the 
most approved type, substantially and 
attractively finished. The main build- 
ing, as well as the added property, will 
undergo considerable alterations. 

The piesent main hardware store, on 
the first floor, will be enlarged so as to 
take in the two offices now in use, and 
the packing room in the rear, thus giv- 
ing a total floor space of 90x40. The 
two upper storeys in the corner bit t i 
ing have hitherto been used mainly as 
showrooms for stoves. Henceforth what 



is now the drug store, to be occupied as 
soon as Mi-. Jamieson 's lease expires, 
will be the showroom, where not only 
stoves, but kitchen utensils and special- 
ties will he displayed. To make it 
suitable for its new purpose, the apart- 
ment will require a number of changes, 
including the removal of the counters 
and shelves, and the transformation of 
its whole front to correspond with the 
main store adjoining, with one door in- 
stead of two, and the window space in- 
creased. 

The upper st rreys mentioned will !>.■ 
used for storing, shipping and packing; 
the packing room to be located prob- 
ably over the offices. The second floor 
of the other building will contain paints 
and varnishes; the third, tinware and 
light goods. In the basement will be 
kept all the glass and dry paints. The 
three large warehouses, two directly in 
the rear and one fronting on Grafton 
street, will be used as heretofore. As a 
lesult of the improvements, admirable 
facilities will be provided for display- 
ing and handling the great stock of 
goods. Not only is the area greatly in- 
creased, bid customers will he enabled 
to make their selection without leaving 
the ground floors. At present one tra- 
veler is employed, and another man will 
be put on the mad about the lirsl of 
duly. 

The firm's retail store is one of the 
most attractively appointed in Canada. 
The steel ceiling of handsome pattern, 
the walnut counters, and show cases of 
most approved style, are features of 
the furnishings. The customers are at 
once impressed with the admirable ar- 
rangement and what could be termed 
almost artistic display of the goods. 
Everything is shown to the very best 
advantage. The spirit of refreshing 
neatness and systematic order prevails. 
Buyers can take, in the stock at a glance, 
and make their purchases from each de- 
partment with ease and satisfaction. 



Trolley competition is affecting the 
steam railways in the State of Indiana. 
says an exchange. Officials of the Lake 
Erie & Western Railroad have under 
consideration a plan for meeting the 
competition of electric lines which par- 
allel the railroad by ihstaling electric 
motors drawing single cars and run- 
ning at the rate of fifty miles an hour 
between Lafayette and Indianapolis. 



T 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

For the convenience of its readers Hardware and 
Metal has opened its columns for the review of catalogues 
booklets or other such publications issued by manufacturers 
or wholesale dealers selling to the hardware, plumbing 
machinery or metal trades. Retailers desiring such publica- 
tions may also have inserted a note to that effect It is re- 
quested that when any of the trade write for any booklet 
mentioned in these columns that they credit Hardware 
and Metai. as the source of their information. 

Generators and Fan Motors. 

UK Canadian General Electric Co., 
tead offices. Toronto, are sending 
out two new bulletins. No. 833, 
and No. S29. Bulletin No. s:S:i illus- 
trates and describes their 1004 ceiling 
fan motors, including price lists. Bul- 
letin No. 829 deals with their gener- 
ators, their construction and specifica- 
tions. This supersedes bulletin No. SI!). 
Readers of Hardware and Metal may se- 
cure these bulletins upon application to 
the Canadian General Electric Co. 

New Era Gas Engine Co. 

Hardware and Metal has received 
from the New Era (fas Engine Co . 
Dayton. 0., a circular describing and 
ilust rating their New Era Gas Engine, 
also the genera] catalogue of the com- 
pany. The catalogue is a handsome one, 
illustrating and describing in detail the 
general construction of the gas and 
gasoline engines manufactured by the 
company, mid also their New Era Patent 
Friction Clutch Pulley. At the back of 
the catalogue some suggestions are given 
about keeping gas engines in good trim, 
and there is also a summary of what 
this firm considers the advantages of a 
gas engine over a steam engine. To users 
and prospective buyers of gas or gaso- 
line engines tins catalogue and circu- 
lar would prove of value. These can 
be had on application. 

Feed Water Heater. 

The Whitlock Coil Pipe Co., Hart- 
ford. Conn., are sending out a booklet 
illustrating and describing the American 
Standard Copper Coil Feed Water 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 
WIRE^*. 

Prompt Shipment* 



The ONTARIO TACK CO 

Limited 

HAMILTON, ©*»T, 



12 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Heater. It is a very neat thine, and 
contains 3ome information that all users 
of steam power should be familiar with. 
Feed water healers in general are 
tii st discussed, then the copper coil 
heater. Readers of Hardware and 
Metal may secure a copy of this cata- 
logue upon application to the Whitlock 
Coil Pipe Co. 

Deming Power Pumps. 

The Deming Co., manufacturers of 
pumps, well supplies, etc., Salem, 0., 
are sending out to the trade a copy of 
their power pump catalogue, illustrat- 
ing and describing their pumping ma- 
chinery for various purposes, includ- 
ing triplex power pumps and deep well 
pumping engines for operation by steam 
engine, gas, gasoline or oil engine, elec- 
tric motor or water power. They an- 
nounce that they have established an 
agency in Canada for their pumping 
machinery, with Messrs. Darling Bros., 
Montreal. The firm wish that inquiries 
from Canada be referred to this firm, 
who will be in a position to execute 
with engineering skill all orders in the 
line mentioned. The firm are also pre- 
paring a r.iw edition of the catalogue 
for issue in the Summer, and readers 
of Hardware and Metal may receive it 
upon application to Darling Bros.. 
Montreal . 

A. R. Williams. 

Hardware and Metal has received 
from the A . R . Williams Machinery 
Co., Toronto, a copy of the chain cata- 
logue of the Jeffrey Mfg. Co., engineers, 
founders and machinists, Columbus, 0., 
for whom the A. R. Williams firm are 
Canadian agents. This catalogue illus- 
trates and describes various kinds of 
chains and drives for elevators, convey- 
ors, drive-belts and sprocket wheels. 
Readers may obtain a copy of this cata- 
logue upon application to the A. R. 
Williams Machinery Co., Toronto. 

Cincinnati Air Compressor. 

The Laidlaw-Dunn-Gordon Co., Cin- 
cinnati, 0., are sending out bulletin 
L508, describing and illustrating the Im- 
proved Cincinnati Air Compressor. In 
the front of the bulletin are given the 
details of construction, each detail be- 
ing well illustrated. Then follow il- 
lustrations and specifications of each 
class of compressor. Readers of Hard- 



J 



The Sherwin-Williams 
ENAMEL PAINT 

A Money Making Specialty. 

Enamel Paint is one of the best 
selling specialties in The Sherwin- 
Williams line. It is backed by 
highest quality and strongest ad- 
vertising. 

It requires great care and right 
facilities to make good enamel 
paint — to have in it the free flow- 
ing and easy working qualities. 
The S-W. Enamel Paint is manufac- 
tured expressly with a view to these 
necessary qualities. It is very 
elastic, does not crack or peel off 
readily, and is easily applied. 

Enamel Paint is the sort of spe- 
cialty that will win trade for you — 
one can of it always sells another — 
its quality draws custom. No other 
specialty shows more profit or is 
more satisfactory to sell. 

Better write for color card and 
prices today. 




For painting tcashstands, 
bedsteads , dressers , 
chairs, etc., The S-W. 
Enamel Paint is a ready 
seller because it always 
gives satisfaction. It dries 
quickly with a good lustre 
and does not pull or drag. 
It is made in 14 beauti- 
ful colors, put up in 
quarter pint to quart 



wThe Sherwin-Williams Co. 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS. 



CANADIAN DIVISION \ 



HEADQUARTERS AND PAINT FACTORY, 

21 St. Antoine St., Montreal. 



VARNISH FACTORY, 

St. Patrick St., Montreal. 



TORONTO DEPOT 

86 York St. 

WINNIPEG DEPOT, 

147 Rannatyne St., East. 



ware and Metal may secure one of these 
bulletins upon application. 

Sheldon & Sheldon. 

Hardware and Metal has received 
from Sheldon & Sheldon, Gait, Out., a 
copy of their mechanical draft cata- 
logue, in which are pointed out some 
of the advantages of the application of 
mechanical draft to power plants. A 
copy of this catalogue should be in the 
hands of all those interested in power 
plants. Readers of Hardware and 
Metal may secure a copy by applying to 
Sheldon & Sheldon. Gait. Ont. 

Electrical Machinery. 

The Triumph Electric Co., Cincin- 
nati, Ohio, have issued a very handsome 
catalogue, describing and illustrating 
their machinery and its application for 

13 



different purposes. The general get-up 
of this catalogue is very attractive; the 
paper, the illustrating, and the typo- 
graphic execution being of a high order. 
In this catalogue there is no attempt 
made to describe the detail construc- 
tion of any of their machines, but the 
purpose of the catalogue is rather to call 
attention to the advantages to be deriv- 
ed in economy and efficiency of a plan 1 
by the application of the electric drive. 
What is said is very instructive, and the 
catalogue would be of great value to 
any manufacturer thinking of instating 
the electric drive. 

Power Transmission. 

Power Transmission Economiser, the 
monthly booklet issued by the Dodge 
Mfg. Co., of Toronto. Ltd., for May, 
contains an article on "The Best Kind 
of Pulley to Buy'": it also contains an 
article entitled -The 'Odd Size' 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



Friend," which deals with the conveni- 
ence to buyers of being able to obtain 
from the Dodge Mfg. Co. so many sizes 
of wood .split pulleys, which may be 
termed standard sizes. 

The Globe Brass Works. 

The Globe Brass Works, Detroit, 
Mich., have a catalogue ready for dis- 
tribution which the trade should have 
on hand for reference. This firm ai - e 
recognized as reliable manufacturers of 
brass valves, cocks, gauges, bibbs, fire 
pots, torches and other supplies for 
machinists, plumbers, tinsmiths, etc. As 
the firm are offering good terms on all 
these lines their catalogues should be of 
decided value to the trade. Copies 
will be sent on request to readers of 
Hardware and Metal . 



JOHN LYSAGHT, LIMITED. 

THE third annual general meeting of 
shareholders was held at the head 
office of the company, St. Vin- 
cent's Iron Works, Bristol, on Wed- 
nesday, when • Mr. Sidney R. Lysaght 
presided. He said that he regretted 
their chairman was not able to be pres- 
ent, owing to illness, but he was glad 
to say that his indisposition was not of 
a serious character. 

The secretary then read the notice 
convening the meeting, and also the 
auditors' report. The directors' report, 
which has already appeared, was sub- 
mitted. 

The chairman, in proposing the adop- 
tion of the report and accounts, said 
that the latter showed a result which he 
thought would be considered most satis- 
factory, and that the figures were such 
as to need very little comment from 
him. The profits hardly reached those 
of 1902, and had been earned with more 
difficulty and an increased turnover. 
Considering, however, the keenness of 
competition, the result was satisfactory, 
and bore witness to sound organization 
and good management. It had been 
mentioned last year, and he wished 
again to point out the advantage to 
the business of its diversified operations. 
These not only comprised the manufac- 
ture of black and galvani/.ed sheets, but 
included a large department of engineer- 
ing and constructional ironwork, the 
smelting of spelter, the weaving of wire 
netting, the production of agricultural 
appliances, and other contributory ad- 
juncts; while the»«distributinig branches 
and agencies were not confined to one 
country, but had been established 
through all the colonies and in many 
foreign markets. Again the good result 



THE RECOGNIZED 

4th OF JULY REVOLVER 




/. J. Model 1900 Double Action 



The best Revolver for the money in the world. Order of your jobber, and 
insist upon getting it. Do not allow ol substitution. Made by 

I ver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works 

MAKERS OF THE FAMOUS 

IV ER JOHNSON REVOL VERS, GUNS and BICYCLES 



NEIV YORK OFFICE, 

No. 99 Chambers Street. 



ARMORIES &• GENERAL OFFICES, 

Fitchburg, Mass., U- S. A- 



had been obtained, not by the excep- 
tional profit of any one department, but 
by the fair and steady returns from a 
great number. The shareholders would 
have noticed that a sum of about £25,- 
000 had been added to the general re- 
serve fund, bringing that up to £130,- 
000, and that a further £1,000 had been 
added to the workmen's provident fund. 
Mr. Lysaght concluded by saying thai 
the brevity of his remarks might, he 
thought, be taken as an indication of 
l lie satisfactory position of the business, 
and that he felt much satisfaction in 
putting before the meeting figures which 
required neither explanation nor decora- 
tion. He moved, "That the report of 
the directors, together with the balance 
sheet and profit and loss account up to 
31st December, 1903, be and are hereby 
approved, and that the dividend at the 
rate of G per cent, per annum upon Lhe 
preference shares, which has already been 
distributed (less income tax), up to 30th 
April, 1904, be and is hereby confirmed, 
and that a dividend at the rate of 10 
per cent, per annum upon the ordinary 
shares for the year 1903 (less income 
tax) be and is hereby declared, payable 
forthwith." 

This was seconded by Mr. II. G. Hill, 
who thought that the state of progress 

14 



placed before them was such as a Bris- 
tol company might well be proud of in 
these times of stress and strife. On be- 
ing put to the meeting, it was adopted 
unanimously. The chairman moved 
that Mr. F. P. Lysaght and Mr. E. 
Davey be re-elected directors, and this 
was seconded by Mr. D. F. Boles, and 
carried.— Iron and Steel Trades Review. 



ANOTHER INDUSTRY. 

A granite and marble business has 
been started in Guelph, under the name 
of the Guelph Marble and Granite 
Works, by John Mclntyre, who has been 
carrying on a similar business in 
Orangeville for some time. 



CANADIAN IRON IN SCOTLAND. 

A recent despatch from London states 
that the Yorkshire Post says that, con- 
sidering the increasingly large shipments 
of Canadian iron into Scotland, Can- 
adian iron is bound to become an import- 
ant factor in the world's iron industry. 
This paper also says that Canadian com- 
panies have now less to fear from Ger- 
man than from British, since the in- 
ception of the German steel trust. 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



WHOLESALE 
ONLY. 



Telephone. 
Office, Park IS84. 



TEMPORARY WAREHOUSE: 
212-218 Cowan Avenue. 

CITY OFFICE— 21 Scott Street; Telephone, Main 4056. 



LIMITED 



ONLY 
WHOLESALE. 



Telephone, 
Warehouse, Park 1588. 




"Diamond" Wood Track Carriers 
Steel " 

Complete with Ball Pulley and Stop Block. 







Double Harpoon Fork 




Sling Pulley 



Grindstones 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., 



LIMITED, 



Toronto. 



Our prices are right. 



GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. 

Factory: Dufforln Street, Toronto, Ont, 

15 



We Ship Promptly. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



New and Second-Hand Machinery, 

Engines, Boilers, Belting, Pulleys, 

Motors, Etc. 

Any readers of this paper wanting 
any of the above goods may have 
an advertisement inserted free in 
Hardware and Metal, the 
machinery weekly newspaper of 
Canada, by enclosing this notice. 
Address 

HARDWARE and METAL 

Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg. 



The 



Hamilton Steel & Iron Company 



LIMITED 



HAMILTON, - CANADA. 

OPEN HEARTH 

STEEL CASTINGS 

OF ANY WEIGHT. 



t rf *»»*«*i »g n»Mji«* i»* M »» MM H P M l»l M l UU »g t+ * W ** + j\ * * * *** 



NOT IN THE COMBINE 

Ask for Prices of 

Shovels, Spades, Scoops, Etc. 

WE HAVE A LARGE STOCK. 

| CANADA HARDWARE CO., united, Montreal 




E7URNED 



FAIRBANKS' BRAND 



I -4 190^ 






REFINED CAST STEEL 



R^.9 



FILES 



AND 



RASPS 



THE BEST MADE. 

We make a specialty of Machinists' Tool Makers' Files and carry an assorted stock. 

Write for prices. 

The Fairbanks Company 



Montreal 



Toronto 



Winnipeg 



Vancouver 



* 



16 



Mh 



June 4, 1904 



Hardware and Metal 




THE MACHINERY MARKETS. 




Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street, East. 

Toronto, June 2, 1904. 

VERY week for some lime pasl 
has seen a large number of 
machinery orders rilled, and 
although no very large ones 
are reported this week, there 
is a good steady business being done. 
There is no great change from last week, 
both of which opened up well, but it is 
said that trade is hardly as good as it 
was a year ago. Inquiries are coming 
in in large numbers, but collections are 
not very good, this being due 
to the depression of the past few 
months. 

General mill supplies are selling best, 
and a few orders for engines and boil- 
ers for saw mills are reported. 

Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, June 2, 1904. 

CONDITIONS on the machinery 
market are reported fairly active 
this week. There is, however, 
no very special feature to be noted. 
There have been numerous inquiries re- 
ceived by local dealers. 

One dealei reports many inquiries for 
engines and boilers, and not a few for 
planing mill outfits and wood-working 
machinery in general. For machine 
i iols and iron working machinery there 
have not been the number of inquiries 
in keeping with the rest id' the market. 
The demands for electrical machinery 
has been good, as usual, and inquiries 
have been coming in freely. 

Setting Up and Running Steam Pumps. 

IN buying, setting up and running 
steam pumps, users have to take 
several important tacts and condi- 
tions into consideration- before they can 
obtain the most economically running 
pump. 

In buying pumps, the user should de- 
termine: First, the maximum quantity 
of liquid to be pumped per given inter- 
val of time; second, to what height the 



liquid is to be lifted by suction, to- 
gether with the length id' the suction 
pipe and the number of elbows in it ; 
third, to what height, or against what 
pressure the liquid is to be discharged, 
and the diameter and length of the dis- 
charge pipe; fourth, what steam pres- 
sure is available at the pump. It is 
quite evident thai if the manufacturer 
is supplied by the buyer with the in- 
formation regarding the foregoing con- 
ditions he will be in a position to supply 
the most economical kind of pump neces- 
sary to operate under those conditions. 

A few hints regarding the setting up 
and running of steam pumps may prove 
of use to those interested in that line 
of machinery. 

The longer the pipe is through which 
I he liquid is pumped, the greater is the 
friction, so that, should the pipes be 
very long, the diameter should "be in- 
creased, in order that the large amount 
of friction occasioned by the length of 
the pipe may be counteracted to some 
extent by the less amount of friction 
occasioned bv the increase in diameter. 
Especially should this be done in the 
suction pipes. Again, in order to keep 
friction down as much as possible, as 
few T's, elbows and valves as possible 
should be used, since they tend to in- 
crease it greatly; and for the same rea- 
son, round bends, instead of elbows, 
should be used. 

If the suction lift is high or the suc- 
tion pipe long, .'i priming connection 
will be necessary; and a vacuum cham- 
ber should also be used, since it helps 
very materially in securing smoothness 
(f operation. Under the same condi- 
tions a foot valve insures quick start- 
ing of the pump by maintaining the suc- 
tion pipe full of water. 

If the suction pipe is not vertical, it 
should be laid with a uniform grade 
from the source of supply to the pump, 
since under that condition will friction 
be least . 

Tt often happens that a pump refuses 
to lift water upon being started with 
the full pressure against which it is 

17 



expected to work, is resting on the dis- 
charge valves, for the reason that there 
is air in the pump cylinders and in the 
pipes, and the motion of the pistons 
merely compresses this air. For this 
reason it is well to run the pumps with- 
out pressure until the air is all expell- 
ed from the suction pipe and cylinders. 
This may be done by placing a swing 
check valve in the discharge pipe, near 
the pump and opening the air vent in 
the discharge pipe, or in the bonnet of 
the pump. 

Finally, if you wish to get satisfac- 
tory service give the pump reasonable 
attention. 

Locomotive Shops to be Enlarged. 

ROGER MILLER, general manager 
of the Locomotive & Machine 
Co., Montreal, in. an interview 

has made the statement that $25,000 
has been set aside for the extension of 
different plants at the Longue Point 

works. One hundred feet are to be add- 

- 

ed to the structural plant; one hun- 
dred and sixty will be added to the 
foundry: sixty feet will be added to 
the erecting shop, and sixty to the 
blacksmith shop. In addition, new ami 
improved machinery is being installed 
every day. The locomotive shops al- 
ready have a capacity of two locomo- 
tives per week, but by the end of August 
will have a capacity of four. 

Mi - . Miller also said that there were 
contracts on hand for forty-five loco- 
motives, all of which were to be turned 
out this year. 

From what Mr. Miller said, the com- 
pany have been having some (rouble in 
getting the number of skilled workmen 
they need. At the present lime there 
are openings for 500 skilled mechanics 
if the men wen_' forthcoming, and with 
the improvements that are being made 
to the works, there will lie 1,500 men 
needed by the beginning of August. 
This condition of affairs has decided the 
company to send to England for me- 
chanics, since the amonnl of work on 
hand prohibits them from taking on un- 
skilled men and training them. 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



June 4, 1904 



GAS GENERATOR FOR POWER. 



IN last week's issue of Hardware and 
Metal reference was made to a gas 
generating plant being instaled in 
the Mount St. Louis Institute. Infor- 
mation regarding these plants has been 
furnished by the Canada Gas, Power & 
Fuel Co., of Three Rivers, Quebec, of 
which Louis H. Bacque is acting' man- 
ager. These plants are in great de- 
mand on account of their economy and 
simplicity in operation, and the com- 
pany recently organized have already 
many orders ahead. The construction 
of the generator is simplicity itself. It 
is nothing more nor less than a sort of 
self-feeder stove, without the feeder 
compartment being separated from the 
combustion chamber. The coal falls 
down to the bottom of the apparatus as 
fast as it is burnt up by the process of 
making the gas. The whole apparatus 
being air tight and gas tight, steam and 
air are either blown in or aspirated, as 
may suit the fancy of the builder, and 
the fire being once started, the carbonic 
acid gas produced by the combustion of 
the lower layers of coal passes through 
the upper layers, which are heated to 
a red heat, and is thereby reduced to 
carbon monoxide, which is a combust ile 
gas . At the ffJW^Pj^) * ne steam blown 



BE 



cease, and there being no gas, the en- 
gine would stop. 

"There is not in existence to-day," 
says Mr. Bacque, "a steam plant that 
can approach these plants as an eco- 
nomic source of power, for either huge 
or small instalations. The larger the 
plants become, the easier it is to real- 
ize a very large saving over steam. 
Their advantages, on the other hand, are 
noticeable indeed. The plants consume 
scarcely any water to begin with, and 
the quality or chemical composition of 
this water is a matter of absolute indif- 
ference. There are no troublsome 
cleanings or inspections to be put up 
with, as in the case of boilers. 

"The insurance rates are reduced by 
the absence of the boiler, and no skilled 
labor whatever is required in connec- 
tion with a plant of this kind. There 
is absolutely no danger of explosion, and 
in Paris and Berlin, as well as in all 
large towns in England, these plants are 
allowed to be put even in a cellar where 
their cost does not exceed, and in some 
cases is less, than a boiler of equal 
capacity. 

"The quality of fuel required to be 
stored for a given amount of power is 
very much reduced, and there is a cor- 




Plant of ioo H. P. gas engine, with a "producer gas" generator, running a dynamo. 



in or aspirated by the engine itself ( as 
is the case of the Mount St. Louis in- 
stalation) is decomposed by the red hot 
coal into its constituent elements, hyd- 
rogen and oxygen, the latter of which 
takes up more or less carbon, according 
to the conditions of temperature, and 
becomes either carbon monoxide or car- 
bonic acid gas, as the case may be. The 
object of those in control of the appar- 
atus will be to find that position of heat 
equilibrium which will produce the 
smallest quantity of carbonic acid in 
the resulting products, while at the same 
time maintaining such a temperature 
in the plant as will insure no loss of 
heat, for in that case the reaction would 



responding economy of space, which is 
worth considering. Raising steam in an 
ordinary boiler takes from thirty to 
sixty minutes, and anwhere from 50 lbs. 
to 200 lbs. of coal, according to the 
size of the plant . In the case of these 
gas plants, the fire is blown and gas 
ready to make a start inside of ten min- 
utes at the outside, while the consump- 
tion of coal does not exceed ten to 
These plants give double the efficiency 
twenty lbs. to get fairly under way. 
as to coal consumed of a first-class 
boiler. The repair bill of a gas plant 
is almost nil, while that of a boiler is 
considerable. 

The horse-power is guaranteed for 
18 



the consumption of less than one and 
one-quarter lbs. of anthracite coal, 
while the very best steam plants, prob- 
ably run with not less than three lb. 
for hour horse-power. Most steam 
plants in the country are running on 
consumption varying between four and 
ten or twelve lbs. of coal for effective 
horse-power measured by breaks. Fin- 
ally, the most remarkable thing about 
these plants is that the results obtained 
in every day practice with unskilled la- 
bor are as good as those obtained at 
the tests. The coal feed being almost 
automatic, no stoker is required. There 
is no danger of explosion from leaks 
in the plant, for the introduction of. any 
large quantity of air would only result 
in the stopping of the engine. The ra- 
diating heat is not much more than that 
of a small heating stove, and as there 
is no coal burnt in the plant, but simply 
the transformation of it into gas, there 
is no smoke. 

As a fair sample of what these plants 
can do, and what they are now doing, 
the case of the plant instaled at Du- 
fresne & Locke's, boot and shoe factory 
at Maisonneuve, may be cited. Whereas 
the power required is eighteen to twenty 
horse-power, the expenditure formerly 
amounted to $18 per week, for fuel 
alone for generating steam. To this 
had to be added the wages of a fireman, 
at $9 per week, making a total of $27 
per week. With the new suction gas 
plant instaled there lately, the weekly ex- 
penditure has been reduced to $5.02 1-2, 
made up as follows : City gas for starting 
the plant, $4.25; 1,100 lbs. of coal at 
$5 a ton, amounting to $2.77 1-2. When 
a proper pressure blower (which is or- 
dered) can be instaled, the expenditure 
for city gas will be done away with. This 
goes to show the very great economy 
experienced in instating one of these gas 
plants. 

Metal Ceiling Machinery. 

REFERRING to the announcement 
in our issue of May 7, of the 
formation of the Gait Art Metal 
Co., Gait, Ontario, Canada, the Canton 
Foundry & Machine Co., Canton, Ohio, 
advise us that they furnished the com- 
pany referred to with their entire metal 
ceiling and ornament plant, including 
classified designs by F. M. Vogan, then 
ceiling expert, with dies, presses and 
everything complete. The company also 
equipped the factory of the Metal Shin- 
gle & Siding Co., of Preston, 
Ontario, Canada, and that of the Mil- 
waukee Corrugating Co., Milwaukee, 
Wis., the latter comprising five carloads 



June 4, 1904 



/MACHINERY 



Hardware and Metal 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal" 



Don't Forgot the lame. . . 

NEWMANS INVINCIBLE 

FLOOR SPRINGS 

Strong, Quick, Reliable, Effective, 
Will close a door against any pressure of wind. 
Far ahead of ordinary door springs, pDeumatlc or 
otherwise. Ask your wholesaler. 

W. NEWMAN & SONS. Birmingham. 



IT WILL PAY YOU 

to stock the best 
globe valves " made 
in Canada." 

KERR'S are made of 
the best steam metal, 
accurately fitted and 
perfectly tight. 




CATALOGUE FOR THE 
ASKING. 



THE KERR ENGINE CO., 



WALKERVILLE, ONT. 



Limited 



SPECIFY 




INJ 

Penberthy Injector Co., 

LIMITED. 
BRASS MFRS W.I,dSOr, Ollt. 

TRUCKS 

for Warehouse 
and Factory. 

Save You Money 
Do Men's Work 
Draw no Salary 

Our Trucks are guaranteed satisfactory. 
Turn in their own length.' 




MADE IN CANADA. 



H. C. Slingsby for Canada. 

Factory, Temple Building, 

Ontario Street, MONTREAL. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

Send for Folder No. 14. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO. 

Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 




BABBIT 



$»Mttf v & pmct M 'sat 



N9 

N9 I 

STAR 

SPECIAL I 

HERCULES 

METALLIC 

IMPERIAL 



THE 



(an ada Metal (p. 



William StJORONTO. tiumone m» mi. 



BEAVER POST HOLE DIGGER 

will please your customers. 
No wood to rot or check. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO THE TRADE. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY, 

LIMITED 
Head Office and Works, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices — Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver, 
Victoria, Rossland. 





TO POLISHERS 



If corundum be next in hardness to the 
diamond, and if emery be iron ore and 
corundum, (as stated by the United States 
Government Report), will it not pay you to 
use our pure Craig Mine Crystal Corundum ? 
It is not adulterated with emery. 

\A/ri-t© for Prices. 



Th£ Canada Corundum Company, umw 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



19 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



June 4, 1904 



of machinery. They have similarly 
equipped a number of other smaller 
concerns. With the services of Mr. 
Vogan, well known as the originator of 
classified designs in metal ceilings and 
side walls, who carefully inspects the 
casting of all the company's ceiling and 
ornamental cast dies, the Canton 
Foundry & Machine Co. are enabled to 
do the best kind of work of this charac- 
ter at the least possible cost. They are 
the only factory making a specialty of 
equipping concerns with complete plants 
for the manufacture of ceilings and or- 
namental sheet metal work from the 
beginning, thus saving them the time 
and expense of experimentation. The 
company state that they have now got 
down to a point where they can install 
a complete metal ceiling outfit, with 
classified designs, for a couple of 
thousand dollars; whereas formerly it 
used to cost many thousands of dollars 
for unclassified designs. The concern 
claim that they are doing their best to 
advance the art of metal ceiling manu- 
facture in the same manner as the Uni- 
versal Machine Works, of which they are 
the proprietors, did in starting the 
manufacture of conductor pipe and eave 
trough machinery. The success of the 
last named branch of industry is patent 
from the fact that nowadays almost 
every one has long length conductor 
pipe and eavetrough on their buildings. 
—Metal Worker. 

Machinery and Electrical Notes. 

A new convent is being built at 
Outremont, Que., which, when finished, 
will be one of the most elaborate in 
America. It is to have a complete ser- 
vice plant, power house and full elec- 
trical equipment. The work for the in- 
stallation of this and for the altera- 
tions in the Mount St. Louis Institute, 
Montreal, is in the hands of the Stand- 
ard Construction Co., of Montreal. 

The event of the year in electric 
lighting circles will be the annual con- 
vention of the National Electric Lighi 
Association, which will be held in Bos- 
ton. May 24, 25 and 26. 

The Frost & Wood Co., of Smith's 
Falls, Out., manufacturers of agricul- 
tural implements, are about to move the 
plant of the Coulthard, Scott Co., of 
Oshawa, acquired by them about a year 
ago, to Smith's Falls, to become part 
of their main plant in the latter town. 
This will mean also the transferring of 
between 75 and 100 men from Oshawa. 

The international Engineering Con- 
gress, which has been organized, and 
will meet at St. Louis from Oct. 3 to 
S, in conjunction witli the St . Louis Ex- 
position, will he of considerable import- 
ace in engineering circles. Lntj'ineers 
specially qualified in the different 
branches have been asked to prepare a 
review of the subject covering the de- 
velopment for the past ten years, to- 
gether with a summary of present prac- 
tice. The subjects discussed will in- 
clude everything in the engineering and 
machinery' line, some of the subjects be- 
ing, the manufacture of steel, tests of 
materials of construction, turbines and 
water wheels, dredges, hoisting and 
pumping machinery, passenger eleva- 
!< is. locomotives, etc. 



CONDENSED MACHINERY ADVERTISEMENTS. 



MACHINERY WANTED. 



Notices under this heading inserted free for subscribers to 
Hardware and Metal. 



DRY KILN APPARATUS— for small heading 
mill ; must be cheap and in goc d repair. 
Box 18, Hardware and Metal, Toront >. 

LATHE, screw cutting, about twelve-inch swit g; 
must be in good order. Box M. 10, Hard- 
ware and Metal, Toronto. 

MINING tools wanted, steam pump or ejector, 
forge, hammers, sledge, i-in. steel, etc, Box 
15, Hardware and Metal, Toronto. 



CTEAM ENGINE WANTED— About 7 h.p., 
"J stationary. Address, with particulars and 
lowest price, Box M 12, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. 

TO BUY . .One small gasoline engine, about one 
horse power, for small yacht. J. J. Turner & 
Sons, tent manufacturers, Peterboro, Ont. 

WANTED— 18-in. turret lathe; second-hand, if 
in good condition. Box M 13, Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. 

WANTED — Second-hand gasoline engine — tn 
good repair ; 2 to 4 h-rsepower. Box 8, 

Markham. 



Y\f ANTED— Immediately— Portable sawmill— 
" » to cut from three to five million feet mixed 
timber, pri cipally birch ; would prefer party who 
would take timber from stump and deliver lumber 
at station. Hanna & Hutcheson Bros., Hunts- 
ville, Ont. 



w 



ANTED — Good second-hand jointer and 
rounder. E. McNabb, Arva P. O., Ont. 



WANTED — Hydraulic press ; capacity at least 
200 tons. Address, giving size and full par- 
ticulars, to Box M 11, Hardware and Metal, 
Toronto. 



MACHINERY FOR SALE. 



Special rates will be quoted for notices under this heading 
for periods of three months or longer. 



A GASOLINE ENGINE— That has stood the 
test and proven to be the most economical 
ever operated in America. Made by Tuerk lion 
Works, Berlin, Ont. 

ENGINES— Gas, gasoline, stationery and ma- 
rine. E. Housey, manufacturer; 815 Queen 
west, Toronto. 



ESTIMATES given on forced and induced 
draft fans for steam plants. Sheldon & Shel- 
don, Gait. 



FOR SALE— Electric table, one motor, six ma 
chines, desk, chairs, and other machinery. 
Apply 85 St. Peter street, Montreal. 



GAS and gasoline engines, stationary, marine, 
automobile ; also launches ; silver medal, 
highest award Dominion Exhibition, Toronto ; 
also Toronto Exhibition, 1902; write for catalogue. 
The Gasoline Engine Co. of Toronto Junction, 
Limited. 



HEAVY portable engines — 21 to 50 h, p.; on 
wheels or skids; for sawmill work; prompt 
delivery; low prices; send for catalogue. The 
Robert Bell Engine and Thresher Co., Limited, 
Seaforth, Ont. 

20 



UOISTING ENGINES, derricks, continuous 
1 ' concrete mixers, 250 yards capacity; dump 
cars, railway construction cars, track-laying tools, 
boilers, etc. Marsh & Henthorn, Belleville, Ont, 



MACHINE TOOLS— I have for immediate de- 
livery a large stock of lathes, planers, shap- 
ers, millers, radial and other drills, punches and 
hears, bolt cutters, hammers, presses, etc., etc.; 
send for stock list. H. W. Petrie, Toronto. 



NEW STATIONARY ENGINES — 20 x 24 
Waterous sawmill engine ; 14 x 18 Waterous 
sawmill engine ; 9 x 10 McEwen engine ; 13 x 14 
McEwen engine. Waterous, Brantford. 



NORTHERN IRON WORKS. Winnipeg— New 
' ' Barnes lathe, 13-in. swing, 7 ft. bed; in per- 
fect condition, cheap; Porter lathe, 14-in. swing, 6 
ft. bed; almost new; bargain; ne,v shaper, 16 x 20, 
and countershaft; best make; cheap. 



N 



ORTHERN IRON WORKS, Winnipeg- 
Steam plant, consisting of a famous Buckeye 
high speed automatic 50 n. p engine, Leonard re- 
turn tubular boiler 70(1. p., smokestack and steam 
pump; a bargain is offered for quick sale. This is 
a first-class outfit, and our price is away down low. 



ROCK DRILLS for waterworks excavating, 
quarries and mines; steam hoists for builders, 
mines and quarries; simple, compound and triple 
marine engines, for pleasure launches. The Do- 
minion Rock'Drill Co., Napanee, Ont. 



THE A. R. WILLIAMS MACHINERY CO., 
* Limited, Toronto, have for sale for prompt 
shipment the following; Two 10" four side raoull- 
ers, new; 42" new sand papering machine; new 
40" Cowan resaw machine. Send for prices. 



THE FAIRBANKS CO. — Temporary ware- 
house, 124 Bay — standard scales, valves, 
truck 5 !, letter presses, shafting, hangers, pulleys 
belling, mill supplies, machine tools ; " Fair- 
banks" gas and gasoline engines; write for price 
list. 



THE STUART MACHINERY CO., Winni- 
' peg — One 50-light dynamo, direct connection 
with gasoline engine; 20 electric motors and dyna- 
mos, from }i h< rse piwer to 1,030 lights; sole 
agents for McGregor-Gourlay's iron-working and 
wood. working machinery. 



AGENCY WANTED. 



WANTED— To secure agency in Manitoba 
town for modern gasoline engine ; state 
terms and commission. Box M 14, Hardware 
and Metal, Toronto. 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



ELECTRICIAN WANTED— Hespeler muni- 
cipal electric light plant; must be able to do 
line work ; all night system ; steady man wanted ; 
state experience and salary wanted. J. W. Christ- 
man, chairman electric light plant, Hespeler. 



A 1 LATHE HAND— In first-class shop ; young 
man preferred ; state refeiences and give 
wages expected. Box 19, Hardware and 
Metal, Toronto. 



June 4, 1904 
it 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



7 J 



STEAM and GAS 

COCKS. 

"GUARANTEED SATISFACTORY." 




Catalogue "C" and Discount 
Sheet on application. 



The Globe Brass Works 

Detroit, U.S.A. 
MADE IN CANADA 




Threshermen, Attention! 

The Threshing belt that gives the greatest 
satisfaction is the " Maple Leaf " 

Stitched Cotton 
Duck Belt 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 

Dominion Belting Company 



Limited 
HAniLTON, ONTARIO. 

Ask your dealer for it and take no other. 
Beware of Imitations 

Our " Maple Leak" Belt Dressing is the 
best on the market — made only by us. 




Manganese 

Anti-Friction Metal 



is the most reliable and 
durable Babbitt Metal 
made. 

Every 



Price 18c. per lb. 
pound guaranteed. 



On sample orders of 100 
lbs. or over we pay freight. 



Syracuse Smelting Works, 



Montreal, 
New York, 
Seattle. 



ASK YOUR DEALER 
OR 
WRITE DIRECT. 



H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 
Steel and Twist Barrels 

Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down ' 
Gun Made 




CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc 

ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. Ki^TS 



NEW YORK OFFICE, ISS Chambers St 

A. 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"quality unquestioned." 




Complete Line TRIMMERS, BANKERS', BARBERS' and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 



Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIEBUSCH & HILGER, Limited, NEW YORK, Sole Agent! 



SEYMOUR 

SMEAR CO. 



Latest Cata- 
logue will be 

sent in 

eichange for 

your business 

card. 



21 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



June 4, 1904 



A QUESTION OF LATHE QUALITY. 



IN the question raised by "Machinist" 
in Hardware and Metal two weeks 
ago regarding engine lathe quali- 
ties, much interest has been taken by 
machinery users, as well as the builders 
in Canada and the United States. In 
addition to the several valuable opinions 
published last week, the following views 
of representative machinists or machin- 
ery dealers are worthy of attention : 

THE GURXEY FOUNDRY CO. 

The Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto, 
have several engine lathes installed in 
their plant built by the John Bertram 
& Sons Co., Limited, Dundas, Out., and 
W. H. Carrick, vice-president of the 
works, says that they are giving excel- 
lent satisfaction, and that they are do- 
ing an equal amount of work with as 
good results as any American lathe in 
the works. 

"We consider," said Mr. Carrick, 
"that the lathe manufactured by the 
John Bertram & Sons Co. is the best 
Canadian-built tool, and we also think 
that that firm's lathe is as good in re- 
gard to workmanship and accuracy as 
any American-built lathe of the same 
pretentions." 

"Do Bertram & Sons build lathes for 
special work ?" 

"Yes, to a certain extent they do. 
We have had some lathes built by them 
specially for our work, and the contract 
has been excellently executed. How- 
ever, quite recently we had some lathes 
of special design installed which we 
purchased in the States. This was done 
for the reason that we were in a hurry 
and could not wait for Bertram & Sons 
to manufacture them, and so we went 
to an American firm who kept in stock 
the very design of lathe we wanted. 
Therein do the American builders 
have a great advantage over the Can- 
adian builders. The American market 
is so large that builders can afford to 
establish immense plants where one line 
of lathes is specialized in, and conse- 
quently that firm can produce that 
special lathe at a much less cost than a 
firm who do not specialize in that kind 
of lathes can. Therefore, although Ber- 
tram & Sons could turn out as effi- 
cient a lathe of special design, if the 
patterns differ from the ordinary engine 
lathe it does not pay them, since they 
have special patterns to make. But 
where the difference is not very great, 
Bertram & Sons have succeeded in pro- 
ducing a lathe which is giving us as 
good satisfaction as the American lathes 
of the same kind give." 

THE FOLSON IRON WORKS. 

F. Poison, of the Poison Iron Works, 
Toronto, when asked to give an opinion 



concerning the best lathe on the Can- 
adian market, said : 

"Take the ordinary engine lathe in 
common use in machine shop and 
foundry, I consider that there is no bet- 
ter manufactured than that of the John 
Bertram & Sons Co., Limited, Dundas. 

"As to the question of the compara- 
tive value of Canadian and American- 
built lathes, there are two ways of 
answering it. As I have said, the Ber- 
tram lathe equals any ordinary engine 
lathe manufactured, but for lathes of 
special design, the Canadian builders 
cannot compete with American, for the 
very evident reason that the American 
market warrants the installation of an 
immense plant of special machinery for 
the manufacture of a special line of 
tools, and therefore it would not pay 
Canadian firms to build a special tool 
by contract, since they could not produce 
it at the cost necessary in order to 
compete with American firms." 

"How does the price of American 
lathes of ordinary type compare with 
that of Canadian ?" 

"Well, the Canadian builder keeps up 
his price as close to the American as he 
can and secure sales." 

THE BERTRAM ENGINE WORKS. 

Mr. R. Bertram, of the Bertram En- 
gine Works Co., Limited, Toronto, says 
that there can be but little doubt that 
you can get as true, accurate and effi- 
cient a lathe of the common engine 
type from the John Bertram & Sons 
Co., Limited, Dundas, as is to be had. 

"We have them installed," said Mr. 
Bertram, "and we have never had any 
trouble with them, either on account of 
inaccuracy in design or finish, or he- 
cause of their not being up to their 
specifications. We have had trouble 
with other Canadian-built lathes, but 
not with the Bertram. Then comparing 
the American and Canadian common 
engine lathe, we have found that Can- 
adian give as good satisfaction as Am- 
erican. Then, too, Bertram & Sons 
will put special appliances on a lathe on 
contract, and there can be but little 
doubt that you can get as true and 
accurate a lathe for ordinary purposes 
from John Bertram & Sons as from any 
manufacturer in the States. 

"Of course Canadian builders do not 
attempt the building of the variety of 
lathes that the American builders do, 
for the simple reason that the Canadian 
market does not demand them in suffi- 
cient numbers to warrant the outlay of 
capital necessary for the carrying them 
in stock, but if you wish it you can 
have a lathe suited to your special 
needs made by contract." 



22 



THE CANAOA MACHINERY AGENCY. 

W. H. Nolan, of the Canada Machinery 
Agency, Montreal, said in answer to a 
question of the relative merit of differ- 
ent makes of lathes : 

"American makers pay attention to 
details and improvements to a greater 
extent than Canadians, and therefore in 
a general way American lathes are bet- 
ter than Canadian. As far as Canadian 
machines are concerned, I consider the 
John Bertram lathe the best made in 
this country. Some manufacturers 
seem to be prejudiced in favor of Am- 
erican lathes, but there is no reason 
why this should be so." 

WILLIAMS & WILSON. 

F. C. Wilson, of Williams & Wilson, 
Montreal, expressed his opinion thus : 

"The subject of the relative merit of 
American and Canadian lathes is a 
broad one. Since the Canadian lathe is 
modelled to some extent after the Am- 
erican pattern, there is no doubt that 
the best American lathe is superior to 
the best Canadian, but many of the 
latter are away ahead of numerous Am- 
erican makes. Taking them all through, 
the average Canadian lathe can be re- 
lied upon, and besides, some excellent 
machines are made in Canada." 

.MONTREAL MACHINERY EXCHANGE. 

Alfred Rubbra, proprietor of the Ma- 
chinery Exchange, Montreal, in discus- 
sing the question of lathe quality with 
a representative of Hardware and 
Metal, said : 

"As a man of twenty years' experi- 
ence in connection with machine tools, 
I can safely say that Canadian-made 
lathes arc equal in every respect both 
as regards efficiency, accuracy and dur- 
ability, to the American makes of the 
same class. There is no doubt the Am- 
ericans put a higher finish on their ma- 
chine, but the general machinist does 
not look for finish. What he wants is 
an accurate, up-to-date machine. There 
is no reason to suppose that the Am- 
erican machinist is endowed with great- 
er brains than the Canadian. I handle 
both makes and so am not wedded to 
either. I think the reason why so many 
American tools are used in manufactur- 
ing in Canada, is because the superin- 
tendents of these concerns are for the 
most part Americans who are conse- 
quently accustomed to American tools, 
and when ordering generally specify a 
certain make. Of course in large con- 
cerns, where they can devote a whole 
shop to one make of tool, there is 
naturally more refinement in manufac- 
ture, as is the case with some of the 
largest American works." 
j. f. m'goun. 

J. F. McOoun, machine shop instruc- 
tor at McGill University, says : 



June 4, 1904 



MACHINERY 



Hardware and Metal 



"In working with lathes of all pat- 
Inns and makes, I find the American 
machines surpass the Canadian, both in 
design and finish. They lend them- 
selves better to different kinds of work, 
and are much easier to manipulate. We 
have both kinds here, and there is no 
doubt the Canadian lathes are gdod 
ones, but as far as I am concerned, I 
would rather work with American." 

JOHN WATSON IRON WORKS. 

The opinion of A. McKen/,ie, superin- 
tendent of John Watson Iron Works, 
Montreal, is directly opposite to that of 
J. F. McCoun. He says : 

"As far as my experience goes, and it 
has been varied, I contend that the 
lathe built by John Bertram & Sons' 
Co. to-day and put on the market by 
them, is as good for ordinary practice 
as any lathe manufactured. If I were 
installing new machines I would ask for 
nothing better than this make, as they 
have always given good satisfaction, 
and are thoroughly reliable and accur- 
ate. The Americans make a higher 
class of lathe, and a more expensive one, 
but for every-day shop work, the Can- 
adian lathe is all sufficient." 

HENDERSON ROLLER BEARING CO. 

Mr. R. I. Henderson, manager of the 
Henderson Roller Bearing Mfg Co., 
Limited, in answer to Hardware and 
Metal's enquiry concerning the relative 
value of Canadian and American lathes, 
said that engine lathes for heavy work 
built in Canada were quite as efficient 
and accurate as American lathes of the 
same class. The same, however, he was 
sorry to say, could not be said of light 
engine or tool-room lathes. The Can- 
adian builder up to the present had not 
been turning out as efficient a lathe 
for light work as his American com- 
petitor. This, Mr. Henderson thought, 
was much to be deplored. 

"Our manufacturing industries are 
growing to such an extent," said he, 
"that we should have nothing but the 
best tool, both as to workmanship and 
efficiency. What Canadian manufactur- 
ing firm does not wisli to support home 
industries ? But this at present in im- 
possible, as we cannot get at home the 
tools suited to our work. In an up-to- 
date Canadian factory the appearance of 
a lathe counts for something, but the 
simplifying ol work and saving of time 
is of greater importance. On the Am- 
erican tool lathes we have the instan- 
taneous gear change and thread cutting 
device, which on certain classes of work 
has almost doubled the capacity of the 
lathe. This device up to the present 
has not been introduced on Canadian- 
made lathes." 

Mr. Henderson went on to sav that if 
the Canadian manufacturers would turn 
out an up-to-date light engine lathe and 
tool lathe they would have no troirble 
in disposing of them, as hundreds of 
American tools are brought into Can- 
ada vearly. 



MACHINE SHOP VENTILATION. 



By J. C. A. 



T 



LIE absolute necessity for provid- 
ing an adequate system of venti- 
lation of public buildings is being 
recognized more and more each year, 
and as a consequence more attention is 
being paid to it. If it is necessary that 
public buildings have a good ventilating 
system, how much more is it necessary 
that a workshop, where the workmen 
spend so many hours of the dav should 
have a good system. Fresh air is 
necessary to maintain the bodily vigor 
and alertness of the workmen. If in- 
stead of fresh air they breathe over and 
over again the same air, thev will be- 
come exhausted and lose interest in their 
work. This good ventilation of shops 
is not only necessary to the health of 
the workmen, but it is also a source of 
economy, since the men keep the vigor 
necessary to perform their work with 
alertness and enthusiasm throughout 
the whole day. 

Then, of course, in Winter the shops 
have to be heated, and to secure the 
best system of heating and ventilating. 
one should depend on the other; that is, 
the system should be a combined sys- 
tem of heating and ventilating. A few- 
words regarding the placement of the 
fresh air inlet and the foul air outlet, 
and best way of heating the air for the 
shops would not he out of place. 

The air, as it is expelled from a per- 
son's lungs, is warmer than the sur- 
rounding air, and, therefore, tends to 
rise. However, since this air is laden 
with impurities, such as carbon dioxide, 
it is at the same temperature heavier 
than ordinary fresh air. Now, the air 
is expelled from the nostrils in a down- 
ward direction, and, therefore, will con- 
tinue in that direction for a certain 
time, and at the same time is being 
rapidly cooled to the temperature of 
the surrounding air._ Therefore, by the 
time its downward velocity is overcome, 
and its lightness has asserted itself and 
it begins to rise, in all probability it 
will have been cooled to the temperature 
ol the mom, and will again begin to 
fall. 

From this consideration it would 
prove the best policy to have the foul 
air outlets near the floor, provided that 
a current of cold air is not entering at 
the floor, and there were a draft crc- 
vision is quile evident, since the cold 
air is heavier than the impure air at 
the ordinary temperature of the room 
and, consequently, if both the cold air 
inlet and the foul air outlet were at 
the floor, and there were a draft cre- 
ated, the outlet would not be a foul air 
outlet at all, but a cold air outlet, 

23 



since the cold air would form a steady 
stream from inlet to outlet. 

If the outlet is to be at, the floor, the 
inlet should be half way up the wall of 
the shop, where a draff should be cre- 
ated; perhaps (he best way for an or- 
dinary machine shop being by use of a 
fan. Then to consider the heating prob- 
lem, it is very desirable, both from the 
heating and from ventilation standpoint, 
that the air as it enters should be 
raised to a certain temperature, not 
necessarily to the temperature desired 
for the shop, but high enough so that 
its heaviness will not cause it at once 
to drop to the floor. This heating can 
be done hy having the air as it enters 
pass through a set of steam or hot 
water coils. After the air has entered 
it may be raised to the desired temper- 
ature for working in bv direct radiation 
from steam or hot water pipes. 

By having the fresh air inlet half way 
up the wall of the shop it is possible to 
obtain the greatest heating efficiency 
from these pipes arranged along the 
wall high up from the floor, whereas if 
the cold air intake were at the floor it 
would necessitate the pipes being ar- 
ranged along the wall at the floor. 

For very apparent reasons it is much 
more desirable that the pipes be some 
distance from the floor in a machine 
shop. The best of these reasons is that 
the tools are generally arranged near 
the windows and, therefore, near the 
wall, and if there were a row of steam 
or hot water pipes along the wall next 
the floor it would not be very com- 
fortable for the operators of these ma- 
chines. 

In arranging a heating and ventilating 
system in a machine shop it is only 
necessary that a few of the common 
laws of ventilating should be followed, 
and that good commonsense is dis- 
played in the arrangement of the sys- 
tem, so that one good point may no1 be 
spoiled by the application of another, 
which does not suit the system being 
carried out . 

A Favorable Annual Report. 

The third annual report of the Mont- 
real Light, Heat and Power Co., Mont- 
real, has been given out. The net pro- 
fits of the company for the nasi year 
are $884,013.85, this being greater in 
amount by $165,346.34 than the profits 
lor the previous year. The installation 
t I' the new purifying- ami oil uas plan! 
at the Kim Station works have been 
completed. The work of standardizing 
ami unifying the electrical department 
has been going on during the year with 
satisfactory results. During the year 
34,501 incandescent, 155 commercial, 50 
streel lights ami 210 motors, equivalent 
to 2,303 h.p.. have been added to the 
company's circuit. There were also 
installed 2,895 uas. 083 electric metres, 
1,949 nas sloves ami 1,091 new services. 



Hardware and Metal 



June 4, 1904 




A New Illuminant. 

ANEW lamp is about to be placed 
on the market that bids fair to 
rival the electric arc now in use; 
in fact, to do away with carbon lamps 
altogether. The announcement comes 
from no less an authority than G. P. 
Steinmetz, which fact ensures its relia- 
bility. It is known as the Magnetite 
arc, and is the outcome of several years 
experimenting in the laboratories of the 
General Electric Co. The electrodes of 
powdered magnetite, mixed with some 
substance used as a restrainer, are made 
in cylinders, the same as the carbon. In 
the case of the carbon the light comes 
from the crater of the positive carbon, 
while with the magnetite arc, which is 
from 3-4 to 1 1-8 inches long, light is 
given out by the arc itself. This gives 
a much greater volume of light, which 
is white and perfectly steady. Another 
feature of the lamp is long life, as in 
ordinary street lighting it will burn a 
month without trimming, and thus re- 
quiring very little attention. The 
mechanism of the lamp is also different. 
The carbon arc lamp is arranged so that 
the carbon floats with a definite adjust- 
ed distance between carbon points, 
which is from three-eighths to seven-six- 
teenths of an inch. The feeding me- 
chanism of this lamp is much simpler. 
When the power is put on the lamp the 
arc is struck by separating the elec- 
trodes to a definite distance, and then 
they arc locked in this position until 
after some hours, when by the consump- 
tion of the electrode the arc lengths, 
and therefore the arc voltage, become 
higher, and when it has reached a suffi- 
cient point it operates the feeding me- 
chanism which restores the arc to its 
original length. 



Two Good Lines. 

THERE aie two exceptionally good 
and profitable lines among elec- 
trical supplies that the hardware 
merchant would do well to handle, even 
though he should decide not to go ex- 
tensively into the business. These are 
electric fans and electric bells. The 



season is just about to open when the 
demand for the former should be great, 
and the very fact of having a few in 
stock should create a demand. A few 
of these on hand and kept running at 
convenient points in the store would 
soon show other mediants their vahi", 
when they >iotic3 how cool and inviting 
the store is, compared with theirs. The 
very fact of having electric fans run- 
ning, producing an agreeable atmos- 
phere, is an attraction to customers in 
the warm days of Summer. It is alto- 
gether likely that the hardware mer- 
chant knows the voltage of the lighting 
circuit in his town, and whether the sys- 
tem used is direct or alternating cur- 
rent, but if he does not these should be 
found out before he places an order. 
The instalacion of an electric fan is as 
simple as putting a lamp in a socket ; 
for, in fact, that is all that is done, when 
the cord and plug are supplied with the 
fan. Electric bells are, or should be, a 
staple, and ought to be kept in stock the 
same as other lines of door bells. There 
is no particular season for them, but no 
doubt a steady demand woidd be creat- 
ed all the year round. The setting up 
of an electric bell requires no knowledge 
of electricity or its action, and the mat- 
ter could well be taken in hand by the 
energetic apprentice, who would, no 
doubt, take a special pride in such work. 

A Mighty Waterfall. 
((THE World's dealest Water- 
) fall" is the title of a descrip- 
tive article in Pearson's (Eng- 
lish) for May. This wonderful natural 
phenomenon, known as the Victoria 
Falls, occurs on the Zambesi River in 
Central Africa, and was discovered by 
Livingstone in 1854. "Only by com- 
parisons can any idea be given of the 
grandeur of Zambesi's fall. Anyone 
who has seen Niagara may gain some 
little notion of its unknown, untamed, 
unspoiled rival by imagining something 
nearly twice and a-half as high and 
twice as wide. And, as this is a prac- 
tical age, a comparison (if the amount 
of In rse-power running away in each 



case is interesting. Niagara's horse- 
power is 7,000,000; the Victoria 
Falls allow 30,000,0(11) horse-power to 
run to picturesque waste. " 

As the Cape to Cairo Railway is to 
cross the gorge of the Zambesi just be- 
low the falls, a bridge has been project- 
ed and is now being built. "The span 
of the bridge's arch will be 500 feet, 
and the height 400 feet above the river 
— so that the bridge will be the highest 
in the world. It is to be built out from 
either bank of the ravine until the steel- 
work of the arch meets in the centre, for 
there is no room for scaffolding." 

"The building ofi the bridge is not the 
only engineering work that Cecil 
Rhodes' great schemes have involved 
with regard to the Victoria Falls. For 
the 30,000,000 horse-power now running 
to waste is shortly to be harnessed and 
applied to the development of the coun- 
try in the near neighborhood — a coun- 
try which is more richly endowed with 
minerals than any other equal area in 
the world. " • 

Large Copper Wire Order. 

The largest order for copper wire 
that has ever been given in Canada has 
just been received by the Dominion 
Wire Manufacturing Co., in the face of 
keen competition between Canadian and 
American manufacturers. A. E. Hanna, 
secretary-treasurer of the company, has 
recently returned from a trip west, 
where he was successful in securing 
this large contract. The wire is for 
the Toronto-Niagara Power Co., and 
consists of 500 miles of stranded cable, 
about half-inch, weighing about one 
and one-half million pounds, and having 
a value of about a-cmarter of a million 
dollars. It will furnish six transmis- 
sion lines, connecting Toronto and Niag- 
ara Falls, to supply power to the former. 

This makes the third time that this 
company has secured the largest con- 
tract, up to the time that has been given 
out in the Dominion. The previous ones 
were both for the C. P. R. Telegraph 
Co., one for 1,400 miles of copper wire, 
and the other one f< r .'5,000 miles of 
wire for telegraphic communication. 



2t 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



This Awning 
is 50 ft. long. 
Has been used 
four seasons, 
and has need- 
ed no repairs. 

Our A wnings 
are the best 
made In 
Canada. 




WemakeRoll- 
erAwningsfor 
Store Fronts 
1 2 feet to 100 
feet, operated 
from one end, 
requiring 
only a boy's 
strength. 



The Awning on the Store Front of Rvrie Bros., the Largest Jewellery House in Canada. 

WE MAKE AWNINGS FOR STORE FRONTS, HOUSES AND OFFICES. 

Examples of work done in Toronto: Awnings used by GRAND & TOY, Stationers ; Walker & Co., Dry Goods ; The Wm Davies Co Iim,tf„ Pro 

VISIONERS.WE DO ALL THE WORK OF THIS FIRM IN WINDOW SHADES AND AWNINGS -37 STORES) ; T„E NASMITH CO., LIMITED, ^k™-»b"1^ 

SEND FOR A QUOTATION. 



WILLIAM BARTLETT & SON, 16 Adelaide St. W., Toronto 




ers, Florence, have 
McDonald & Wells. 



been succeeded by 



ONTARIO. 

Fire damaged the premises of H. 
Lindop, planing miller, St. Thomas. 

It is reported that J. Westron, hard- 
ware dealer, Haileybury, has sold out. 

Farrell & Gallagher, plumbers, Sault 
Ste. Marie, have been succeeded by J. 
E. Farrell. 

Fire damaged the premises of the To- 
ronto Woolen Machinery Co.; insurance 
covers the loss. 

The Boston Wood Rim Co., Limited, 
Toronto, have assigned to the National 
Trust Co., Limited. 

McDonald & McCrary, hardware deal- 



QUEBEC. 

The Standard Foundry Co., Longueuil, 
have sold out to M. Ameye. 

The International Electric Co., Mon- 
treal, have been registered. 

Beauvais Freres, hardware dealers, 
Montreal, have been registered. 

Fire damaged the premises of J. 
Beckett, St., carriage maker, Shawville. 

L. A. Nobert, hardware dealer, 
Louiseville, has obtained an extension. 

The assets of E. Lemire, carriage 
maker, Pont De Maskinonge, have been 
sold. 

S, H. Young, chief agent of the Can- 
adian Bridge Co., Limited, Montreal, 
has been registered. 



MANITOBA AND N.W.T. 

Henry & Parr, harness makers, Grand 
View, have dissolved partnership". 

W. W. McCubbin, hardware dealer, 
Nesbitt, has sold out to W. R. Middle- 
miss. 

W. C. Bond & Co., hardware mer- 
chants, Plumas, have sold out to A. S. 
Hare. 

W. B. Lennard, hardware merchant, 
Langenburg, has been succeeded by w! 
Denmark. 

The business of W. Murray, hardware 
dealer, Alameda, is advertised for sale 
by mortgage. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

G. R. C. Taylor, brick manufacturer, 
Cranbrook, has been succeeded by Tay- 
lor & Davis. 



:tT7) 



R 



Of " IS 190 




The popularity with the trade of the BLOODS CHAHPION 
Bush Hooks is due to the merits they possess. 




fOCT. 18 190^ , „ y 

Made from High Carbon Steel, carefully tempered and well finishfeft, witlT selected hickory 
handles. The peculiar shape of the blade reinforces each part, making a strong tool throughout 

■In ■■-_ U.-.-.I.X ... .... . - 




»o Size. Weight without handle. 

9 Light | lb. 8oz, 

10 Medium I lb. 12 oz. 

II Heavy 2 lb. 4 oz. 

MADE ONLY BY 



Length of handle. 
34 inches 
34 " 
34 " 



THE AMERICAN AXE (EL TOOL CO., INC 

Canadian Sales Office, - - - Coristine Building', Montreal' P.Q. 



25 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



A WHOLESALE HARDWARE FIRM IN A RINK. 



SINCE the big Toronto fire a subject 
of frequent comment lias been the 
manner in which the largest suf- 
ferers met the crisis resulting from the 
entire destruction of their stock at one 



^oods a full stock was speedily as- 
sem'fcled] and in a few days sorting or- 
ders were being filled largely from the 
new warehouse. Such goods as were 
not in stock were sent on from the i'ac- 



4F 



oJ> /Kf 




H. S. Howland, Sons & Co.-Premises destroyed by fire, April 19. 



of the busiest seasons of the year. In- 
side of twenty-four hours many of the 
(inns were out seeking new premises, 
ami in less than a week some of them 
had gathered together a stock of quite 
respectable proportions. 

A striking instance of this quality of 
enterprise ami extensive connection is 
iurnished by the experience of H. S. 
Howland, Sons & Co., whose premises 
on Front street west were included 111 
the tireswepl area. 

Scon alter the lire this firm started to 

seek new premise-. 1 der a complete 

new stock, to make arrangements for 
filling orders in hand, and to accept new 
, i-ders from their cost, mors all over 
Canada. Mention has been ma'de in 
these columns of the remarkably short 
lime in which all this was accomplish- 
ed. 

Cowan Avenue Rink, which was se- 
cured by the linn, has since April lit 
been a centre of exceptional activity. 
By their energy in sending orders to the 
manufacturers, and the co-operation of 
the latter in promptly delivering the 



oPQJ 



June 4, 1904 

should be in every way as complete as 
was the case in the old premises. Manu- 
facturers in all parts of Ontario, in 
the other provinces, throughout the 
United States, in Great Britain and in 
other European markets were com- 
municated with and all, with hard- 
ly an exception, have evidently 
made an esnecial effort to 

send their goods along promptly. Con- 
sequently there has been a constant 
pouring in of all hardware lines. From 
the accompanying illustrations the trade 
will understand how wide-reaching has 
been the operations which have resulted 
in the assembling, of such a large and 
varied stock as that shown. 

The upper view shows the desolation 
which now marks the block in which the 
warehouse of II. S- Howland, Sons & 
(•„. stood for years. The lower vtew 
on this page shows the method of ar- 
ranging small shelf goods at one corner 
of the rink. The larger views on the, 
opposite page give a fairly good im- 
pression of the magnitude of the area 
now covered for the first time with 
hardware stock. 

In addition to the space shown the 
rink provides office accommodation on 
tiie first floor, and a room on the 
ground, floor, which is rapidly filling up 




H. S. Howland, Sons & Co.-A corner of present premises. 



tones as fast as orders were received. 

From the first, however, there has 

been no lei up in the energy directed 

towards gathering together a slock that 

20 



with cutlery of all descriptions, while 
a small building has been built on the 
north side, in which heavy hardware 
lines are kept in stock. 



June 4. 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 











r- - \ 



H. S. Howland. Sons & Co. ,— Two Views of the Cowan Ave. Rink Warehouse. 



Hardware and Metal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



a M|«|MlM|M|M|K|K| M|M!MrM|W| *|M|M|M|«l«l«l*|W|W|MWIM|M|*lMl^ 




Silverware that Sells. 



WHEN YOU SELL 

SILVERWARE 



Sell something absolutely satisfactory and reliable. 
Avoid " cheap " silverware. You can repose com- 
plete confidence in every article bearing our trade 
mark. 

The Britannia or Base Metal is hard and of 

highest quality. 
The Electroplate is of Sterling Silver, generously 

applied. 
The designs, workmanship and finish of 

STANDARD SILVERWARE are of the 

first rank. 

Send for our large and handsomely 
Illustrated Catalogue— FREE 

THE STANDARD SILVER 
CO., Limited, 

Hayter St., TORONTO. 



□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□□naannannnnooaDDnaanaanaanaiiiaaDDDnDDDnnDaaDnnn 




Creamery 
Cans 




Milk 
Cans 





Samson 


Dufferin 


Dairy 


Dairy 


Pails 


Pails 



These goods are now moving rapidly in all districts. 
Are you getting your share of the business ? 



The McClary IN/lanu 

London, Toronto, Montreal, Winnipeg, 

"Everything -for the T 



uring Q^o. 

Vancouver, St. John, N.B. 

inshop." 



28 



June 4, 1904 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



President : 

JOHN BAYNE MACLEAN, 
Montreal. 

The MacLean Publishing Co. 

Limited 

Publishers of Trade Newspapers which circu- 
late in the Provinces of British Columbia, 
North-West Territories, Manitoba, Ontario, 
Quebec, Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, P.E. 
Island and Newfoundland. 



OFFICES. 



Montreal 



Toronto 



- - - 232 McGill Street. 
Telephone Main 1255. 
10 Front Street East. 
Telephone Main 2701. 
Winnipeg, Man. - Room 308, Mclntyre Block. 

Telephone 1846. 

L. P. Luxton. 

LONDON, ENG. - - 88 Fleet Street, E.C. 

J. Meredith McKim. 

Manchester, Eng. .- 92 Market Street. 

H. S. Ashburner. 

ST. JOHN, N.B. - - No. 3 Market Wharf. 

J. Hunter White. 

New YORK - Room 1241 New York Life Bldg 

W. T. Robson. 
Vancouver, B.C. - Geo. S. B. Perry. 

Subscription, Canada and United States, $'2.00. 
Great Britain and elsewhere • - 12s 

Published every Saturday. 
Cable Address | JSSftcSSC 

CHEAPER GAS. 

JUST at a time when the subject of 
cheaper gas is in the minds of all 
consumers of it, and active discus- 
sions thereon are taking place in muni- 
cipal councils, it is interesting to notice 
the entrance of a new factor in the 
situation. It is none other than the 
introduction into the country of separ- 
ate gas generating plants. Several in- 
stallations of the same have recently 
been made, which are said to be the first 
in America. The question that natur- 
ally arises is, Can these be operated at 
a cost enough lower than the present 
price to actually warrant their introduc- 
tion 1 ? From figures published else- 
where in this issue of Hardware and 
Metal, there seems to be no doubt that 
such is the case. Whether the gas is 
required for power for manufacturing, 
or to generate electricity for lighting, 
the cost is only a fraction of that charg- 
ed by the companies for gas or electric 
power. The actual cost of electric 
power in Montreal is about $80 per 
hcrse-power year, for small powers. It 



is claimed that with a gas generator 
power it is available at less than $10 a 
h.p. year, which is a startling differ- 
ence. A general introduction of these 
in large buildings and manufacturing 
concerns would do more to lower prices 
than a dozen closed sessions of commit- 
tee, and much more effectively. Any- 
thing of this kind ought to be hailed 
with delight by those who are daily la- 
menting the high prices paid to monopo- 
lies, and there is no doubt that the ef- 
fect of this innovation will be felt soon- 
er or later. Consumers are pretty well 
tired paying the demanded prices for 
light and power, but it remains for the 
future to tell what reception will he 
accorded these plants, and to what ex- 
tent they will affect prices. 



TRADING STAMPS. 

IT would seem as if the City Council 
of Montreal, as well as the Legisla- 
ture of the Province of Quebec, 
have been exercising themselves over 
something which does not warrant the 
pains they have taken. For instance, 
it may be either wise or foolish to is- 
sue or receive trading stamps, and there 
may be better and more attractive 
means of giving a discount for cash. 
The legality of the business, however, 
is not open for discussion, except by the 
courts. Senator Dandurand, acting in 
behalf of the Traders' Advertising Com- 
pany, made the interesting statement 
last week before Judge Mathieu that 
there are twenty-five thousand families 
in the City of Montreal alone who have 
books of cash receipts, which means 
that nearly half the entire City of 
Montreal is interested. 

No sooner had the City Council pass- 
ed a by-law regarding trading stamps 
than the Traders' Advertising Company 
immediately set to work and obtained an 
injunction to prevent it from beling put 
into force. Usually thirty days' no- 
tice is given before the enactment of a 
new by-law. The city attorneys, evi- 
dently, were arbitrary, and claimed that 
the charter allowed special action in 
this case. Judge Mathieu was of a dif- 
ferent opinion. The argument of the 
29 



counsel of the Trading Stamp Company 
was, that by not following the usual 
rule of giving thirty days' notice of the 
adoption of a by-law, the city would 
injure this large number of families who 
held books of stamps partly filled, and 
which were retained solely in the antici- 
pation of redemption. Mr. Dandurand 
impugned the constitutionality of the 
Act, by which the city is authorized to 
pas* such a by-law, and claimed that the 
matter <^me within the jurisdiction of 
the Federa^ parliament onl> . It is well- 
known that Provincial Legislatures have 
been put in control of the administra- 
tion of justice, and also distinctly in 
control of municipal institutions. Is it 
possible that the Local Legislature has 
not the prerogative of allowing the City 
of Montreal to pass a by-law? If so, 
our laws cannot legally be enforced. At 
any rate, the injunction against the city 
has been granted, and the whole busi- 
ness will have to go through the courts 
again . 

The City Council of Montreal appar- 
ently exercised very little care in the 
first place. Who was it that advised the 
aldermen in respect to the forty dol- 
lars, imposed, according to the first by- 
law, when it should have been twenty 
dollars? It is odd that with five alder- 
men who are grocers, and thoroughly 
know the trading stamp business, the 
city council should have been so ill-ad- 
vised by the City Attorney regarding 
as important an issue as the suppression 
of trading stamps. The weakest point 
in the argument of the aldermen was 
that trading stamps had been suppressed 
in other places, which is really no argu- 
ment at all. It is only fair to say that 
the objection to the stamps, however 
good, or however ill they may be, has 
been raised by dealers who do not use 
them. Merchants claim that the tendency 
is to create monopolies, and that certain 
dealers using the stamps attract custom- 
ers to their trade exclusively. There is 
another point which has not been men- 
tioned, namely, that large numbers of 
merchants in Montreal are quite indif- 
ferent as to whether others use trading 
stamps or give away sovereigns. It is 



Hardware and Metal 



EDITORIAL 



June 4, 1904 



surprising, however, to learn that such 
a large number of grocers use the stamps 
and that some thousands of buyers waul 
I hem. How the whole thing will end is 
hard to say, hut as far as the city coun- 
cil is concerned, a large number of gro- 
cers feel that they are quite able to fight 
their own battles. 



AMERICAN MACHINERY IN 
CANADA. 

CANADIAN manufacturers of ma- 
chine-tools are about the first of 
the Canadian industries to feel 
i he effect of the industrial depression 
in the United States. For some time 
the competition of American machinery 
houses has been keen, and during the 
last fortnight or so the presence in Can- 
ada of representatives of two ( of the 
largest and most conservative firms in 
the United States has added materially 
to the sharpness of competition. 

The most serious feature of this com- 
petition, at least as far as Canadian 
tool builders are concerned, is the cut- 
ting of prices; rather the "slaughter- 
ing," of the United States tools on this 
market. It is customary in the United 
States to make a discount of 10 per 
cent, on orders for export, and an extra 
2 1-2 per cent, on orders for Canada, 
the extra 2 1-2 off being to offset the 
saving in packing, as compared with 
boxing for ocean shipment. 

This, we have said, is customary; bul 
in times of depression one may look for 
even more than is customary. It is 
stated, on what seems reliable author- 
ity, that discounts to the extent of 10 
ami 2 1-2 and 25 per cent., or about 
34 per cent, straight, are given on large 
orders of I nited States machine-tools 
for Canada. 

Thus, with competitors in the field 
who, on a normal market, are so busy 
with domestic trade, that they pay no 
attention to foreign, and with prices 
being cut in wholesale fashion, the Can- 
adian machinery firms are convinced thai 
depression in the United Stales is no! 
a good thing for Canada. 

Charges of undervaluation at the cus- 
toms are made, but where values are so 



susceptible to change as in the United 
Slates machinery market to-day. Gov- 
ernment officials cannot be blamed if 
they in some cases are not able to cope 
with the importers who have been able 
to secure discounts of 30 per cent, or 
more. 



to refund duty paid on imported goods 
destroyed by lire after they leave the 
possession or control of the customs. 



AN OPPORTUNE STRIKE. 
The strike at the works of the Do- 
minion Iron and Steel Co., Sydney, N. 
S.. which includes 1,700 out of 2,000 
men, will not seriously inconvenience 
that company. The iron and steel mar- 
ket has been lacking in strength for 
some time, so it is probable that instead 
of being handicapped by a limitation of 
I he production, they will be benefited by 
an opportunity to clear away stock ac- 
cumulation to make necessary repairs 
and alterations to the works. 



LIABILITY OF BONDED GOODS. 

IS a merchant liable to pay duty on 
imported goods which have been 
damaged or destroyed while in customs' 
bond '.' In view of the fact that a large 
quantity of bonded goods were destroy- 
ed in the Toronto fire, this question is 
interesting. The section of the Cus- 
toms' Act of Canada dealing with this 
subject reads : 

"Upon production of satisfac- 
tory proof to the Minister of 
Customs of the .actual injury or 
destruction, in whole or in part, 
of an}' goods by accidental fire, 
or other casualty, while they re- 
mained in the custody of the offi- 
cers of the customs in any cus- 
toms' warehouse, or while in 
transportation in bond from one 
port of entry to another port of 
entry in Canada, or while with- 
in the limits of any port of en- 
try and before they were landed 
under the supervision of the offi- 
cers of the customs, the duties 
on the whole or the part thereof 
so proved to be injured or de- 
stroyed may he abated or refund- 
ed; provided that the claim is 
made within fourteen days after 
the date of the casualty, and 
that due appraisement is made 
of the goods so alleged to he 
injured as soon as they can he 
examined." 
There is no provision in the law which 
would enable the Customs' Department 



CONSERVATIVE BUYING. 

Indications point to an active busi- 
ness in Canada during the Summer and 
Fall seasons of the present year. Yet 
it would be unwise for hardware mer- 
chants to buy heavily in anticipation of 
such activity. Unfavorable weather 
and a presidential election are a com- 
bination that do much to decrease com- 
mercial and industrial activity through- 
out the United States. Depression there 
mav mean severe competition in many 
lines of hardware in Canada. This fact 
should be taken into_ consideration by 
manufacturers, jobbers and retailers in 
their preparations for the Fall trade. 



PERSONAL LETTERS. 

SOME hardware dealers have adopted 
the excellent expedient of sending 
out personal letters to some of 
their customers. 

Where one can take the time and 
its typewriter (and he can afford to 
take the time) this is one of the great- 
est means for securing profitable, 'paying 
customers. See that every new con- 
tractor and construction company that 
comes to the town has a personal let- 
ter, inviting them to call, inclosing your 
card, and perhaps making quotations on 
the lines of goods they will use. It 
will bring them every time, and in nine 
cases out of ten they will stay. 



A POINT IN ADVERTISING. 

The point of advertising is not so much 
to keep the name of the store in promin- 
ence, as to advertise what the store does 
for its customers and the goods to be 
found on its counters. If people are 
interested in these goods — and the only 
way to interest them is by telling them — 
they will read the advertisement, and 
read it through from beginning to end. 
If your announcement appeals to them, 
they will follow it to your store and your 
advertisement has done its work. The 
matter of actually selling the goods rests 
on your shoulders. 



30 



Jvre 4, 1904 



EDITORIAL 



Hardware and Metal 



Interviews with business men. 



Depression in Uni'ed States. 

MR. R. A. Baiires, of Baines & 
Peckover, Toronto, returned on 
Friday from a trip through the 
Central West States. Mr. Baines re- 
ports that the unfavorable weather of 
Hie past Winter has done much toward 
causing a slackening of the prosperity 
of former years in those states. "The 
cessation of business caused by the 
presidential election in the States 
will," Mr. Baines says, "do much to 
templet e the effect of the bad weather 
and to cause general depression there. 
Manufacturers in the States are already 
recognizing this condition and are dis- 
posed to look to Canada for an outlet 
for such of their stock as they will be 
unable to find sale for at home. This 
will be felt more and more by Canadian 
manufacturers, and the sooner they 
recognize the danger of 'slaughtered' 
goods from the United States the better 
for themselves." 

T. P. Alcock, of Gurney's. 

T. P. Alcock, secretary of the Gurney 
Foundry Co., Limited, Toronto, reports 
business active. "Our sales are larger 
than even last year. Business in On- 
tario and the east is fully as good, if 
not better, than last year, while the de- 
mand from Manitoba and the west is 
away in excess of any previous year. 

"The only proof we need of the pros- 
perity and growth of the Northwest is 
our business with that country. If 
you could see the orders that come in 
from our retail customers in the west 
you would know how their business is 
growing. As their business grows our 
trade expands. Then as new places open 
up we are getting new customers. We 
have reason to feel satisfied with the 
share of business coming to us." 
A Retailer's Experience. 

Few merchants can trace .the history 
of their business to such a remarkable 
beginning as can J. U. Smith, hard- 
ware merchant, Baysville, Out. Mr. 
Smith is a painter and decorator by 
Hade. Up to about a dozen years ago 
he confined himself to this work, which 
necessitated his moving about over a 
wide area. While working on a con- 
tract at Bracebridge a boiler explosion 
at the Baysville saw mill sent the 
great iron boiler hurtling across the 
river, crashing through his house and 
landing many yards beyond. 

Fortunately his wife and children, 
though onlv by the merest circumstance, 
were out of the house at the time, but 
his home was a complete wreck. This 
made it necessary for him to go to 



Baysville and settle down while a new 
home was built. During this stay he 
decided to instal a stock of paints, 
wall papers, window shades, etc., his 
wife attending to the store when he was 
away on contract work. 

Being a man of energy and enterprise, 
Mr. Smith added line after line to his 
stock until to-day he has one of the 
neatest hardware, etc., stores in any 
place the size of Baysville in Ontario, 
while he is recognized as a shrewd and 
conservative business man by his towns- 
men as well as by the firms he does 
business with. He continues to make a 
specialty of paints, being an "Ark 
Brand" enthusiast. He is also the 
"Oxford" stoves representative over a 
wide area. Mr. Smith is an ardent be- 
liever in doing business with one house 
in each line, and in addition to tin- 
lines mentioned is a loyal customer of 
Wood, Vallance A Co. in general hard- 
ware, and of Gowans, Kent & Co. in 
lamps, etc. In addition to his business 
as a retailer, he is a justice of the 
peace and a conveyancer, thus coming in 
contact with practically all classes in 
his district. Thus in his residence in 
Baysville he has won honor as well as a 
large measure of success. 

James Cartland & Son's Representative. 

Mr. W. Willis Mitchell, of James 
Cartland cV: Son, Birmingham, Eng., is 
making one of his annual tours through 
Canada. He is in Toronto this week, 
and is registered at the King Edward 
Hotel. Mr. Mitchell has been making 
an annual tour to Canada for some 
years. His firm is known the world 
over for the excellent quality of the 
brass goods they manufacture. Since 
Mr. Mitchell was in Toronto last he has 
visited South Africa in the interest of 
his firm. In reply to a question by 
Hardware and Metal, he said that while 
trade there was undoubtedly quiet, the 
old established firms there were, as a 
rule, doing a fairly good business. The 
firms which had suffered most we r e the 
newer enterprises, while the adverse 
trade conditions were magnified by peo- 
ple who had emigrated there and had 
been unable to find employment. 

Mr. Mitchell is a close observer, 
sharpened no doubt by his years of 
travel around the world. He gave some 
study to the labor question while in 
South Africa. Generally speaking, he 
declared himself to be opposed to 
Asiatic labor. "But," said he, "the 
conditions are these : The kaffirs will 
iio1 work, at least in sufficient number 
to supply the demand for labor. The 



average kaflir has several wives to 
sist in supporting him, and his greatesl 
ambition is to earn enough nionev to 
buy mealies sufficient for his family re- 
quirements. The Chinamen, on the 
other hand, are industrious. These 
Chinamen, when brought to South Af- 
rica, are provided with accommodation 
outside the town, not in the town, and 
in some instances they are allowed to 
bring (heir wives with them. When 
their term of contract has expired they 
are sent back to their native land." 

"What is your experience with Cm 
adian trade ?" asked Hardware and 
Metal. 

"Our experience," he said, "is satis- 
factory. Our trade is growing. I „„ d a 
growing sentiment in favor of British 
goods in Canada and, let me say, not 
only in Canada but in all British col- 
onies as well. Speaking for our firm 
we determined not only to hold the 
trade that we have, but to secure even 
a greater share than we now possess 
and what is more, we intend to do it 
on quality. We are doing everything 
that we can to comply with the condi- 
tions of the Canadian market, but we 
will do it on quality alone, and the 
manner in which our business is grow- 
ing proves that it is the proper course 
to pursue." 

While an old firm, James Cartland cv 
Son do not hesitate to adopt whatever 
new methods will advance their inter- 
ests. New machinery is continually be- 
ing put in, and newer designs manufac- 
tured. Since Mr. Mitchell was in Can- 
ada last year they have made some 
marked improvements in their factory. 

After leaving Toronto Mr. Mitchell 
will visit Winnipeg, and then return to 
Great Britain, sailing for home on June 
25. He has a great many friends in 
the trade, and his welcome on this trip 
has been most cordial. 



ORDER FOR FIRE HOSE. 

'I he council has ordered 1.000 feet of Keystone 
hose from the Canadian Rubber Co. of Montreal 
through their agents, James Nek«n & B c . 

The above, from a Windsor, Out,, 
paper, is worthy of the attention of 
hardware retailers throughout the Do- 
minion. In all probability the majority 
of municipalities in Canada are no; as 
well equipped with fire hose as they 
might be. An examination into this 
matter might enable hardware retailers 
to secure an order of similar nature, if 
not equal magnitude, to the one credit- 
ed to the enterprise of James Nelson o: 
Brother. It is such orders as these that 
make the total revenue from a retail 
hardware business a source of satisfac- 
tion. 



31 



Hardware and Metal 



June 4, 1904 




QUEBEC MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, June 3, 1904. 

FOR some weeks the Spring 
rush in the hardware trade 
has been continuing with an 
animated and decidedly brisk 
tone, but this week, the first 
time for several past, there is just the 
slightest indication of a falling off in 
business. Some dealers, however, re- 
port a great activity in nearly all lines, 
without any diminution whatever in the 
volume of trade, and the actual amount 
of business done. Any lessening there 
may be is no doubt due to the uncertain 
weather, and to the fact that farmers 
are too busy to do much trading. This, 
no doubt, exercises a direct influence 
on the energy of the retailer, which les- 
sens keenness for ordering, with the re- 
sult of fewer orders and inquiries be- 
ing received by the wholesale trade. 

There is no change of price reported 
this week in any of the hardware goods. 
Although the shortages that were so no- 
ticeably felt a few weeks ago are being 
caught up with to some extent, there 
is still a shortage in some lines, namely, 
certain sizes of screws, single-barreled 
guns in some numbers, and the more 
commonly used sizes of nails. Import 
shipments of window glass are arriv- 
ing, so that dealers are in a good posi- 
tion to fill orders. Business in cement 
and firebrick is somewhat backward, due 
to the unsettled state of the weather, 
and also to labor difficulties. Trade in 
ice cream freezers is a record breaker 
this year, and far exceeds that ofj pre- 
vious years. The largest order ever 
given in Canada for copper wire is re- 
ported this week. Collections are re- 
ported fairly good, and there is a gen- 
eral healthy tone to the hardware mar- 
ket. 

Washing Machines— There is a fairly 
good demand this week. We quote as fol- 
lows: Round (three legs), $35.00 per 
dozen; round (four legs), $39.00 per 
dozen; square (regular size), $42.00 per 
dozen; square (smaller size), $36.00 per 
dozen; round rotary, $56.00 per dozen; 
souare rotary, $59.00 per dozen; "New 
Century," $72.00 per dozen. 

Lawn Mowers— Continued repeat or- 
ders are being received for lawn mow- 
ers. Prices are the same. We quote 
as follows: With 8-inch wheel, 
sizes 12, 14 and 16 inch, $2.65 each; 
with 9-inch wheel, size 12, $3; size 14, 
$3,121-2; size 16, $3.25 each; Philadel- 
phia pattern, size 12, $3.25, size 14, 
$3.50; size 16, $3.75 each; High Wheel. 
size 12, $4; 14, $4.25; 16. $4.50; 18 
$4.75; 20, $5.25 each. 



Garden Hose— A lively demand is re- 
ported, and a brisk trade is be- 
ing done. Discounts continue: Trade 
75 per cent. ; Western, 65 and 10 per 
cent. ; White, 40 and 10 per cent. ; 
Maroon, 40 and 10 per cent. ; cotton, 
60 per cent. 

Hose Reels— Trade is exceptionally 
good, in keeping with other Spring 
lines. Prices 15 to 25 per cent, higher 
than last year. 

Lawn Sprinklers— Orders for these 
are still numerous. Prices as before, 
$2.50 to $18 a dozen. 

Ice Cream Freezers— This has been a 
record year for ice cream freezers, more 
being ordered than ever before. We 
quote the following range of prices for 
the leading brands: One quart, $1.50 
to $1.60 each; 2 quart, $1.70 to $1.80 
each; 3 quart, $1.95 to $2.25 each; 4 
quart, $2.35 to $2.60 each; 6 quart, 
$2.95 to $3.25 each; 8 quart. $3.70 to 
$4.10 each; 10 quart, $4.75 to $5.50 
each; 12 quart, $5.75 to $6.50 each; 14 
quart, $6.75 to $7.50 each. 

Agricultural Wrenches— There is no 
new feature in this market. A f|air 
demand . 

Harvest Tools— Trade continues the 
same. Discount as before, 60 per cent. 

Spring Hinges— A lively trade is re- 
ported. We quote as follows: No. 5, 
$17.25 per gross; No. 10, $18 per gross; 
No. 20, $10.50; No. 120, $20; No. 51, 
$9.25; No. 50, $27.50. 

Heavy Screw Hooks and Hinges— 
Business is good in heavy screw hooks 
and hinges this week. Prices the 
same. Sizes 12 inches and upwards 
are selling at $3.25 per 100 lbs; the 
price of the 6, 8 and 10-inch sizes is 
$4.25. 

Wire Coat and Hat Hooks— There is 
an ordinary fair demand for this line. 
Prices are the same as before, 75c a 
gross for 3 inch. 

Churns — Merely a medium trade be- 
ing done. Discounts, 40 and 15 per 
cent, f.o.b. Montreal, and 30 and 15 
per cent, f.o.b. factory. 

Green Wire Cloth— The demand keeps 
increasing with the approaching Sum- 
mer season. The price is as before, 
$1.50 per 100 souare feet. 

Poultry Netting— The market is live- 
ly, and a good trade is reported. Dis- 
counts for 2-inch 19-gauge standard ex- 
tras are 60 and 5; for 2-inch 16-gauge, 
the discounts are 55 and 5 per cent. 

Galvanized Poultry Netting Staples— 
The demand along with poultry netting 
is reported good. Prices are: Sizes 5-8, 
3-4, 1 1-8, 10 lb boxes, $12.50 list; 25 
and 50 lb. boxes, $12.25 list; 100 lb. 
boxes, $12 list. Less 57 1-2 per cent. 

32 



Bed Staples— No change this week. 
Prices continue as before. The 
discount on the Montreal Roll- 
ing Mills Company's and the 
B. Greening Wire Company's lists 
is 57 1-2 per cent . The discounts on the 
Dominion Wire Company's list are 25 
and 2 1-2 per cent. 

Blind Staples— No new fjeature in the 
market. Discount, 40 per cent. 

Galvanized Coil Spring Wire— A fair 
demand. Our quotations are as follows: 
Nos. 6, 7 and 8, $3.20; No. 9, $2.70; 
No 10, $3.30; No. 11, $3.35; No. 12, 
$2.95; No. 13, $3.10. Carlots 5 cents 
less. Freight prepaid is less than car- 
lots to extent of 25 cents and in car- 
lots to the extent of 20c. 

Galvanized Wire— Business in gal- 
vanized wire is reported good 
this week. We quote as fol- 
lows: No. 5, $3.65; Nos. 6, 
7 and 8, $3.10; No. 9, $2.45; No. 
10, $3.15; No. 11, $3.20; No. 12, $2.60; 
No. 13, $2.70; No. 14, $3.70. In car- 
lots f.o.b. Cleveland, No. 5, $2.15; 
Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9, $2.10; No. 10, $2.15; 
No. 11 $2.20; No. 12, $2.25; No. 13, 
$2.35; No. 14, $2.45. In less than car- 
lots 121-2c extra per 100 lbs will be 
charged. 

Barb Wire— There is still a big de- 
mand for barb wire, and no shortage 
is reported. We quote: $2.75 per 100 
lbs. f. o. b. Montreal, and $2.50 f. o. 
b. Cleveland. Carlots of 15 tons $2.40 
f. o. b. Cleveland. 

Smooth Steel Wire— There is not 
much of a market for this line at present- 
We quote : Bright and annealed, $2.50 per 
100 lb. f.o.b. Montreal, Toronto, Halifax, 
London, Hamilton and St. John. Net ex- 
tras per 100 lb are now as follows: 
Coppered wire, 60c; tinned wire. $2; 
oiling, 10c; spring wire, $1.25; best 
steel wire, 75c ; bright soft-drawn, 15c ; 
hay-baling wire, 20 to 25c. 

Annealed Hay Wire— A featureless 
market. Pi ices continue the same, with 
usual discounts. 

Fine Steel Wire— Few orders are re- 
ported this week Discounts 25 per cent., 
with net extras as follows: 1 and 2 lb. 
hanks, 25c per 100 lbs. ; 1-2 lb. hanks, 
37 l-2e; 1-4 lb. hanks, 50c. 

Brass Wire— Only a small trade is be- 
ing done in brass wire. Discount as 
before, 60 per cent. 

Copper Wire— Ordinary business is 
fair this week, Avhile the largest order 
ever placed in Canada, consisting of 750 
tons, was given this week. Discount 
60 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— These are selling 
well. Discounts are: Best iron rivets, 
section carriage and wagon box, 
black rivets, tinned do., coopers' rivets 
and tinned swede rivets, 60 and 10 per 



June 4, 1904 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



cent. ; swedes iron burrs are quoted at 
55 per cent, off; copper rivets with the 
usual proportion of burrs, 45 per cent. 
off and coppered iron rivets and burrs, 
in 5-lb carton boxes are quoted at 60 
and 10 per cent, off list. 

Tinned Roofing Caps— A g 1 trade 

in tinned roofing caps is reported this 
week. Price, 6c a lb. 

Screws— Although the manufacturers 
have been able to some extent to catch 
up with the demand, there is still a 
shortage in some sizes. The de- 
mand keeps up well. We quote 
discounts as follows: Round head, 
blight, 82 1-2 per cent. ; flat head, bright, 
87 1-2 per cent. ; brass, round head, 75 
per cent. ; brass, flat head, 80 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts— There is no marked 
difference in the demand, which con- 
tinues good. We quote discounts 
as follows: Carriage bolts common, ($1) 
list 3-16 and 1-4 diameter, 60 per 
cent.; carriage bolts, common ($1) list, 
5-16 and 3-8 diameter, 55 and 5 per 
cent. ; carriage bolts, common ($1) list, 
7-16 diameter and up, 55 per cent. ; car- 
riage bolts, full square ($2.40) list, 60 
per cent . ; carriage bolts, Norway iron 
($3) list, 60 per cent.; machine bolts, 
3-8 diameter and under, 60 per cent. ; 
machine bolts, 7-16 diameter and larger, 
65 and 5 per cent. ; plow bolts, 55 and 
5 per cent. ; blank bolts, 55 and 5 per 
cent.; bolt ends, 55 and 5 per cent.: 
sleigh shoe bolts, 70 per cent. ; coach 
screws, cone point, 70 per cent. ; nuts, 
square, all sizes 4c per lb off; nuts, 
hexagon, all sizes, 4l-4c per lb off. 

Washers, 45 per cent. off. 

Cut Nails — Cut nails are somewhat 
scarce this week in some sizes. There is 
an active business being done. We 
quote as before, $2.30 per keg, f.o.b. 
Montreal, Hamilton, Toronto and St. 
John. 

Wire Nails— Trade is very brisk, with 
the supply scarcely up to the demand. 
We quote the following prices: $2.40 
per keg carlots and $2.45 per keg 
in small lots f.o.b. Gananoque, 
Montreal, London, Hamilton. Toronto, 
Brantford and St. John. 

Pressed Spikes— No change. Dis- 
count as before, is 25 per cent. 

Horse Shoes— A good active trade is 
being done in horse shoes this 
week. Prices continue steady at 
former figures. Our quotations are 
as follows: Iron shoes, light 
and medium pattern, No. 2 and larger, 
$3.65; No. 1 and smaller, $3.90: snow 
pattern, No. 2 and larger, $3.90; No. 
1 and smaller, $4.15; light steel shoes. 
No. 2 and larger, $3. SO; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.05 : featherweight, all sizes, 
to 4, $5.35; toe weight, all sizes, 1 to 
4, $6.60. Shoes more than one size in 
a keg, 10c per keg extra f.o.b. Mont- 
real only. 

Horse Nails— Trade is fairly good. 
We quote: C brand, 40, 10 and 7 1-2 per 
cent, off list, other brands 55 to 57 1-2 
per cent, off list. 

Fence Staples — Prices continue as 
follows: $3 per 100 lb. keg for galvan- 



ized and $2. SO for bright; 25 to 50 lb. 
packages, 25c extra. 

Boxwood Rules— Discounts continue 
52 1-2 to 50 per cent, off list. 

Shot Guns — There is a good demand, 
with still a shortage in some numbers 
of single-barreled . 

Cordage — An active trade is report- 
ed this week. We quote as follows: 
Pure manila, 15c; British pure manila, 
121-2c; sisal, 12c; double lathyarn, lie; 
single lathyarn, 101-2c; Russian tarred 
spunyarn, 13 l-2c ; jute rope, 3-8-in in 
diameter and upwards, 9c; cotton rope, 
21c; cotton twine, 24c for 3 and 4 ply. 
Cotton bedcord, 90c to $1.70, according 
to length. Sash cord 30 to 311 -2c; cot- 
ton candle wick, 22 to 24c. 

Roofing Pitch— Trade is good. No 
change in price this week, which is $1 
per cwt. 

Building Paper— A brisk business is 
being done in building paper this 
week. We quote as follows: Tarred 
felt, $1.85 per 100 lbs ; 2-ply ready roof- 
ing, 90c per roll; 3-ply, $1.15 pei roll; 
carpet felt, $2.25 per 100 lb; dry sheath- 
ing, 40c per roll ; tar sheathing, 50c per 
roll ; dry fibre, 55c per roll ; tarred fibre, 
65c per roll O.K. and I.X.L., 70c per 
roll ; heavy straw and sheathing, $35 
per ton; slaters' felt, 65c per roll. 

Firebricks — The supply is away ahead 
of the demand, which is none too brisk. 
English are selling at $16 to $22 per 
1,000; Scotch, $17 to $22. 

Cement — Although a good business 
is being done, it is reported back- 
ward, and not up to last year. 
Prices remain unchanged at former 
quotations. which are : Canadian 
cement, $1.90 to $2.25; English, $2.15 
to $2.25; Belgian, $1.70 to $1.95 per 
barrel, ex store, and American, $2.20 
to $2.40 ex-cars. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

Conditions in the plumbing supply 
trade are much the same as last week. 
Business continues very active, and with 
the exception of iron pipe, prices 
throughout are steady. Some conces- 
sions are obtainable on large orders of 
iron pipe . The city trade is good . 

Lead Pipe — There is nothing new to 
note this week. Trade continues active. 
The price is 8c for composition, waste and 
aqueduct and 7c for ordinary. The dis- 
count is 35 per cent., f. o. b., Montreal, 
Toronto, St. John, N.B., and Halifax ; 
f. o. b. London, 15c per 100 lbs. extra; 
f. o. b. Hamilton, 10c per 100 lbs. extra. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— The market 
is apparently steady now„ discounts 
quoted being closely followed by the 
supplv houses. Business is of average 
volume. We quote discounts again, as 
follows: Light soil pipe, 3 to 6 in., 50 and 
10 per cent. ; medium and extra heavy 
soil pipe. 2 to 6 in., 60 per cent.; extra 
heavy soil pipe, 8-in, 45 per cent. Light 
fittings, 2 to 6-in, 50 and 10 per cent. ; 
medium and extra heavy fittings, 2 to 
6-in, 60 and 5 per cent. ; extra heavy 
fittings 8-in, 45 per cent. 

Iron Pipe and Fittings— We quote: 
Standard pipe, per 100 feet, in length 



under 19 feet— black, 1-8-in, $2.30; 1-4- 
in, $2.30; 3-8-in, $2.55; 1-2-in, $2.85; 
3-4-in, $3.65; 1-in, $5.20; 1 1-4-in, 
$7.35; 1 1-2-in, $8.95; 2-in, $12.55. 
Galvanized— 1-4-in, $3.20; 3-8-in, $3.45; 
1-2-in, $3.90; 3-4-in, $5; 1-in. $7.20; 
ll-4in, $10.05; 1 1-2-in, $12.20; 2-in, 
$16.85. In the above the discount on 
1-8, 1-4 and 3-8 in black and 1-4 and 
3-8 in galvanized is 121-2 per cent.; 
and on 1-2 to 2, inclusive, in black and 
galvanized is 15 per cent. Extra heavy 
pipe, plain ends, are quoted per 100 feet 
as follows: Black, 1-2-in, $4.20; 3-4-in, 
$5.25; 1-in, $7.55; 1 1-4-in, $10.55; 
1 1-2-in, $12.75; 2-in, $17.60. Galvan- 
ized— 1-2-in, $5.25; 3-4-in, $6.65; 1-in, 
$9.55; 1 1-4-in, $13.25; 1 1-2-in, $16; 
2-in, $21.90. The discount on all sizes 
of extra heavy pipe is 12-12 per cent. 
Coupling, 1-2 in. to 2 in., 55 per cent, 
discount; nipples, 1-4 and 3-8 in., 65 per 
cent discount and 1-2 in. to 6 in. 70 
per cent, discount. 

Solder— We quote 18c for bar and 
18 l-2c for wire solder. 

METALS. 

Local business in metals is fairly ac- 
tive, and there is not much change to 
report. Interest has centred this week 
on the strike of the Dominion Iron and 
Steel Company's employes at Sydney, 
and the decision of the company to 
close down their plant indefinitely. The 
iron market is quiet, buying being re- 
stricted to current requirements. The 
English market for Canada plates is re- 
ported very firm, but on the local mar- 
ket there is a disposition to go after 
business, even at low prices. Price 
changes are not numerous. Tin is easier, 
but no actual change has been made lo- 
cally. Copper and lead are both weak- 
er, the former being now quoted at 
13 3-4 to 14c, and the latter at $3.30 to 
$3.40. 

Pig Iron— There is not much activ- 
ity at present in the pig iron market, 
as buyers are specifying only for pres- 
ent requirements. Reports from the 
United States markets have not been re- 
assuring, and in anticipation of lower 
prices the foundries are placing no orders 
for future delivery. There is not enough 
actual business to establish a market, 
but prices are nominally as before. 
Much interest attaches to the mil ul- 
timate strike at Sydney. We quote: 

"Disc," No. i $17-5° delivered Montreal. 

"Dom.," No. i 13 50 

Usual difference in price for lower gradf s. 

Ferrona No. 1 gi8 00 delivered Montreal. 

No. 2 17.50 " 

No. 3 16 50 " 

" No. 4 16.00 " 

Londonderry. $18.50 to $19.00 delivered Montreal. 

Summerle<» " 18.50 

Glengarnock 20.00 " 

Gartsherrie 1925 

Carnbroe 18.50 " 

Carron No. I 19.00 " 

(•pecial) 1750 

Ayresome No. 1 17. 50 

No 3 16.90 

Clarence No. 1 16.25 

'" No. 3 16.00 

Bar Iron— Prices ;ire steady, and no 
change is expected. Prices have been 



33 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



June 4, 1904 



so low for ;i long time that the local 
market is not much affected by the 
decline in Y . S. markets. We quote: 
Merchants' bar, $1.75; horse shoe iron. 
$2; forged iron. $1 .!).">. 

Merchant Steel— Business is fairly ac- 
tive. We quote: Sleighshoe, $1.90; 
tire. $1.95 to $2.10; spring, $2.7.") to 
$2.95; toe calk, $2.55; machinery (iron 
finish), $2. 15; square harrow, $2.45. 

Tool Steel— Trade is quiet. We 
quote: Black Diamond, 8c to 9c; 
Sanderson's, 8 to 9c, according to 
the grade; Jessop's, 13c; Jonas & Col- 
yer's, 10 to 20c; "Air Hardening," 65c 
per lb.; Conqueror, 7 l-4c. 

Black Sheets — Primary markets show 
increasing strength'. We quote: 28- 
gauge, $2.35; 26-gauge. $2.30; 22 to 24- 
gauge, $2.2.1; 1!) to 20-gauge, $2.20: S 
t<> l0-gauge, $2.35. 

Galvanized Iron— There is an active 
business this week in galvanized iron. 
We quote: 28-gauge, Queen's Head, 
$4.30: (lorbal's "Best Best." 

$4.30; Apollo, 10 3-4 oz., $4.30; Fleur- 
de-Lis, $4; Comet, $4; Bell brand, $4. 
In less than case lots 25c extra. 

Canada Plates— The English market 
continues very firm, but locally there is 
a disposition to go after business, even 
it' there is not much money in it. Hence 
there has been no advance in sympathy 
with the strong primary market. We 



quote again as follows: 



$2.30: 



60s, $2.3.">: 75s, $2.40; full polished, 
$3.60 and galvanized $4 to $4.10; gal- 
vanized (iOs. $4.25 to $4.35. 

Sheet Zinc— The market is steady at 
the advance noted in last issue, ('ask 
lots are selling at about $6.50, and 
smaller lots a! $6.75 to $7. Supplies 
are still short. 

Zinc Spelter— Quoted at 6c. 

Tinplates— Market firm. Cokes $3.75, 
and charcoals $4. 

Ingot Tin— The tin market is easier 
this week, but there is no actual change 
locally. Former ((notations of 31 1-2 
to 32c still obtain. 

Ingot Copper— The copper market is 
weak, and there lias been a decline of 
l-4c. Quoted now at 13 3-4c per lb. 

Pig Lead— The lead market is weak, 
and local prices show a decline. Quo- 
tations now are $3.30 to $3.40. 

Antimony— Cook son's is quoted at 
7 3- 4c 

Coil Chain— We quote: No. 6, 
10c; No. 5, 9c; No. 4. 8 l-2c; 
No. 3, 7c; 1-1-ni, $6.10; 5-16- 
in. $4.70; 3-8-in, $4; 7-16-in, $3.80; 
1-2-in, $3.70; 9-16-in, $3.55; 5-8-in. 
$3.35; 3-4-in, $3.30; 7-8-in, $3.25: and 
1-in, $3.20 with 10c allowance on car- 
lots. 

Scrap Metals and Old Materials— 
There has been a general decline in scrap 
metals. New quotations are as follows: 
Heavy copper and wire, 10 l-2c to lie 
per lb.: light copper, 1-2 to 10c; heavy 
ied brass, '■> 1-2 to 10c per lb.; heavy 
yellow brass, <Sc; light brass, 5c; lead. 
2 3-4c; zinc, 2 3-4 to 3c; iron, No: 1 

r. in-lit. $lti; machinery scrap, $14 to 



$15; stove plate, $12; mixed country 
rags, 65 to 75c per 100 lbs. ; old rub- 
bers, 5 to 5 l-4c per lb. 

HIDES. 

A steady demand has been noticed in 
the hide market lately, and some fluc- 
tuations have taken place. 

No. 1 beef hides 08 084 

No. 2 " 07 07* 

No. 3 " 06 064 

Lambskins 75 

No. 1 calfskins Oil 



ONTARIO MARKETS. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street, East 

Toronto, June 4, 1904. 

QTEADINESS is the dominant quar- 
v3 ity of the hardware market situa- 
tion at the present. A good sort- 
ing- business in seasonable lines, particu- 
larly screen doors and windows, harvest 
tools, fencing wire, wire and cut nails, 
screws, bolts, nuts, building paper, me- 
tal lath and sheets, as well as other ma- 
terials and supplies for building, is re- 
ported. In some places building opera- 
lions are particularly active, while 
business with farmers is about as brisk 
as last year. A good feature of the 
trade is the increase in the size of or- 
ders coming to hand from Northern On- 
tario, Manitoba and the West. Prices 
are practically unchanged throughout.. 

Washing Machines— Business con- 
tinues good. Prices are steady 
al the new basis. The quotations 
now are: Round, reacting washer, 
per doz., $50; square, reacting washer, 
per doz.. $5!); Kclipse, $48; Dowswell. 
$36; New Century, $72. 

Oil Stove Wick— Prices are steady 
since the advance of about 10 vei cent- 
last week. 

Steel Track Door Hangers — An active 
business in this line has continued. 
Prices are now at the same basis, as 
follows: Steel track. 1 x 3-16 in., $3.50; 
1 1-4 x 3 1-16 in., $4.50 to $4.75. 

Chain- Business of a sorting nature 
continues excellent. Prices are still as 
follows: 1-4-inch. $5.60; 5-16 inch, $4.45; 
3-8-inch, $3.85; 7-16-inch, $3.70; 1-2-inch 
$3.55; 9-16-inch, $3.45; 5-8-inch, $3.35: 
3-4-inch, $3.25. 

Step Ladders— We quote at 10c per 
foot for 3 to 6 feet, and 11c per foot 
for 7 to 10 feet ladders. 

Lawn Mowers — The demand has con- 
tinued active, a good sorting trade still 
being reported. Prices are unchanged, 
as follows: Woodvatt, 10 1-2 inch 
wheel, $8.50; Star, inch, $7: 
Daisy. 8 inch, $5.75; Philadelphia, 
71-2 inch, $7; Ontario, 71-2 inch. 
$15.80; King Edward, 12 inch, $9.50 
(14-inch cut in aboce). D. Maxwell & 
Sons, 101-2 inch, $7.50 to $10; 9 inch, 
$5,50 to $6.25; 8 inch, $4.90 to $5.50. 
Discount 50 per cent. 

Screen Doors— A good trade is doing 
in this line. We quote as follows: Com- 
mon, two or three panel, walnut, 4 inch. 
$0.50; yellow and green stained, $6.75: 
in natural colors oil finish, $8.75, with 
20c less for 3-inch style. 



Screen Wire Cloth— Prices steady at 
$1.50 per 100 square feet. 

Spring Hinges— A good business is 
reported with prices steady as follows: 
No. 5, $17.25 per gross;' No. 10, $18 
per gross; No. 20, $10.50; No. 120, $20; 
No. 51, $9.25; No. 50, $27.50. 

Barb Wire— Activity continues. We 
quote as follows : $2.75 per 100 lbs, f .o.b. 
Toronto and $2.50 f.o.b. Cleveland. Car- 
lots of 15 tons, $2.40 f.o.b. Cleveland. 

Galvanized Wire— An excellent sort- 
ing trade in this line is reported, 
prices being firm throughout : No. 5. 
$3.65; Nos. 6. 7 and 8, $3.10; No. 

9, $2.45; No. 10, $3.15; No. 11, $3.20' 
No. 12, $2.60; No. 13. $2.70; No. 14, 
$3.70. In carlots f.o.b. Cleveland, No. 
5, $2.15; Nos. 6, 7, 8 and 9, $2.10; No. 

10, $2.15; No. 11, $2.20; No. 12, $2.25; 
No. 13, $2.35; No. 14, $2.45. In less 
than carlots, 12 l-2c per 100 lbs extra 
charged. 

Coiled Spring Wire— Sorting orders 
are still coming in freely. Prices are 
steady. Our quotations are as follows: 
No. 9, $2.70 per 100 lbs, freights equal- 
ized with factory points at Montreal, 
Hamilton, London, Welland or Walker- 
ville and allowance to other points up 
to 25c; carlots, $2.65, freight allowance 
to 20c. 

Wire Nails— A good business is ie- 
ported, with prices still steady. Quota- 
tions are: $2.45 per keg f.o.b. To- 
ronto, with carlots $2.40. 

Cut Nails— A moderate trade doing, 
with prices steady at $2.30 per keg f.o.b. 
Toronto and Hamilton . 

Horseshoes — There is not much activ- 
ity. Prices keep steady, how- 
ever, as follows: iron shoes. 
light and medium pattern. No. 2 
and larger, $3.80; No. 1 and smaller, 
$4.05; snow No. 2, and larger, $4.05; No. 
1 and smaller, $4.30: light steel shoes. 
No. 2 and larger, $3.95; No. 1 and 
smaller, $4.20; featherweight, all sizes, 
to 4, $5.50; toe weighf, all sizes, 1 to 
4, $6.75. Tf shipped from factory 15c 
less. 

Horsenails— Business is less active. 
Prices are unchanged. We still quote 
discounts as follows: "C" brand. 40. 
10 and 7 1-2 per cent.: other brands 55 
and 57 1-2 per cent. 

Screws — An active demand continues. 
Prices are unchanged. We quote: 
Flat head bright, 87 1-2 per cent, 
discount; round head bright, 821-2 per 
cent.; flat head brass, 80 per cent.: 
round head brass, 75 per cent.; round 
head bronze, 70 per cent. ; flat head 
bronze, 75 per cent. 

Rivets and Burrs— Business keeps 
active in all sizes. Prices are firm. We 
quote as follows: Iron rivets, 60 and 10 
per cent, discounts; iron burrs, 55 per 
cent. ; copper rivets, with usual propor- 
tion of burrs, 45 per cent. 

Bolts and Nuts — An active business 
is reported in all lines. We still 
quote: Carriage bolts, common ($1 list). 
3-16 and 1-4-inch, 60 per cent. ; 
5-16 and 3-8-inch, 55 and 5 per cent.; 



34 



June 4, 1904 

PORTLAND CEMENT 

CANADIAN, ENGLISH, 

GERMAN and BELGIAN. 

FIRE BRICKS, FIRE CLAY, 

ENAMELLED BRICKS, all colors. 
BUILDING BRICKS. 

SEWER PIPES, CULVERT PIPES, 
WHEELBARROWS, 

FOUNDERS' and CON- 
TRACTORS' SUPPLIES. 



F. HYDE & CO. 

WELLINGTON ST., MONTREAL 

Deseronto Iron Co. 

LIMITED 

DESERONTO, ONT. 



Manufacturers of 



Charcoal Pig Iron 

BRAND " DESERONTO." 

Especially adapted for Car Wheels. Malleable 
Castings, Boiler Tubes, Engine Cylinders, Hy- 
draulic and other Machinery where great strength 
is rt quired [ Strong, High Silicon Iron, for Foundry 
Purposes. 



c. 



J! 



MIDLAND 

BRAND 

Foundry Pig Iron. 

Made from carefully selected Lake Superior 
Ores, with Connellsville Coke as Fuel, "Mid- 
land" will rival in quality and grading the 
very best of the imported brands. 



Writ* for Prlo* to Sal** AgonU 

Drummond McCall & Co. 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



•r t* 



Canada Iron Furnace Co. 

MIDLAND, ONT Umlt«d 

We invite inquiries for 

Steel Rails 



BAR IRON, PIG IRON GALVANIZED IRON, 
CANADA PLATES, TINPLATES, WIRE ROPE 
(W. B. BROWN A CO. i, CEMENT, FIRE BRICKS 
ORE BAGS, GRAIN BAGS. ETC. 



C.F. JACKSON & CO., Limited 

Importers and Commission Merchants 

151 Hastings St. W., VANCOUVER, B.C.. 
and LIVERPOOL. ENGLAND. 



THE MARKETS 

7-16 and up, 55 per cent . ; carriage bolts, 
full square ($2.40 list), 60 per cent. ; 
carriage bolts, Norway iron ($3 list), 
60 per cent . ; machine bolts, 3-8 and less, 
60 per cent. ; 7-16 and up, 55 and 5 per 
cent.; coach screws, cone points, 66 2-3 
and 10 per cent. 

Cordage — Sonic orders are now 
coming in. The quotations on binder 
twine for the season of 1904 are as fol- 
lows: Sisal, 10 l-4c; standard, 10 l-4c; 
standard Manila (550 ft.), 11 l-4c; Man- 
ila (600 ft.), 12 l-4c; pure Manila (650 
ft.), 13 l-4c. Five-ton lots l-8c less. 
Carload lots l-4c less Prices on other 
lines are unchanged as follows: Pure 
manila, 15c; British pure manila, 
121-2c; sisal, 12c; double lathyarn, lie; 
single lathyarn, 10 l-2c ; double shingle- 
yarn, lie; single shingleyarn, 101-2c; 
sashcord 'Hercules,' 32 to 35c; 'Star,' 
36 to 38c; cotton rope, 3-16-inch and up, 
201-2 to 22c; 5 32-inch, 25 to 27c; 1-8- 
inch, 25 to 28c; cotton twine, 3-ply 25 
to 28c; 4-ply 32 to 34c; calking cotton, 
161-2 to 17c; cotton waste, criored, 
6 3-4c; white, 11 to 13c. 

Firebrick— A good trade is doing, 
with prices steady. We quote English 
and Scotch firebrick at 28 to 30c 

Cement— Trade is at its full height, 
with prices firm, as below: Canadian 
Portland, $1.90 to $2.25; American 
Portland, $2 to $2.10 t'.o.b. Toronto. 

Building Material— The market is 
steady and prices firm. We quote: Tar- 
red ' felt. $1.85 per 100 lbs; 
2-ply ready roofing, 90c per roll; 3-ply. 
$1.15 per roll; carpet felt, $2.25 per 
100 lb; dry seathing, 40c per roll; tar 
sheathing, 50c per roll; dry fibre, 55c 
per roll; tarred fibre, 65c per roll; O.K. 
and I.X.L., 70c per roll; heavy straw 
and sheathing, $35 per ton; slaters' felt, 
60c per roll. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

Activity continues with the various 
supply houses. An excellent business 
is doing in corporation brass work, in 
lead pipe and in enameled ware. Trade 
in iron pipe is less active. Prjces are 
nominally unchanged, but cutting is still 
reported in iron pipe and fittings. 

Lead Pipe— Prices are unchanged. 
We quote : Lead, 7c ; lead waste pipe, 8c ; 
discount 35 per cent. 

Soil Pipe and Fittings— Prices remain 
unchanged, while there is a good amount 
of trade being done. We quote : Medi- 
um and extra heavy pipe and fittings, 
60 per cent.; 7 and 8-inch pipe 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Iron Pipe Fittings— Business is not 
so active. Prices are firm. We 
quote nominally: Malleable fittings, 
20 per cent.; cast iron (stand- 
ard), 571-2 per cent.; headers, 521-2 
per cent.; flanged unions, 60 per cent.; 
malleable bushings and plugs, 57 1-2 per 
cent.; nipples up to 6-inch inclusive, 
67 1-2 per cent. 

Copper Range Boilers— A fair, steady 
trade is being done since the new prices 

35. 



Hardware and Metal 



Sheet Zinc 
Sheet Copper 

and other Metals. 
From Stock or for Import. 



A. C. LESLIE & CO. 

509-512 Merohants Bank Building, 
MONTREAL. 



The only reliable Pump for you to handle is 

The McDougall Standard 



It stands hard usage. 

Lasts interminably. 

Is made of iron and 
steel. 

Otitlasts several 
wooden pumps. 

It's made in Canada. 

Want our catalogue? 
It's free. 



The 

E. McDougall Co. 

Limited 

Gait, Ont. 




(( 



ALPHA 



>> 



111011 SPEED STEEL 

Crucible Cast Steel 

for Tools of all kinds. 

"BX/'Min^rsjDrill Steel 

B. K. MORTON & CO. 

SHEFFIELD. ENQ. 

Agents for Ontario : 

BAINES& PECKOVER, Toronto 
Agents for British Columbia : 

E. G. PRIOR &. CO., Limited, Victoria. 
Canadian Rep. 

D.W.CLARK, P.O. Box 520, Toronto 



Nova Scotia Steel 
& Coal Co., Limit* 

NEW GLASGOW, M.S. 

Manufacturers of » ■ 

Ferrona Pig Iron 

And SIEMENS MARTIN 

OPEN HEARTH STEEL 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



June 4, 1904 



were issued. Discounts at 15 per cent, 
continue. 

Iron Pipe— Prices are being cut by 
dealers, and a considerable amount 
of business is being done. We 
ouote nominally f. o. b. Toronto: 
Black pipe, 1-8-inch, $3.05; 1-4-inch, 
$2 07; 3-8-inch, $2.25; 1-2-inch, 
$2.50; 3-4-inch, $3.22; 1-inch, $4.58; 
11-4-inch, $6.47; 11-2-inch, $7.85; 2- 
inch, $11.05; 21-2-inch, $19.25; 3-inch, 
$22.75; 3 1-2-inch, $28.75; 4-inch, 
$35.25. Galvanized pipe, 1-4-inch, 
$2.88; 3-8-inch, $3.11; 1-2-inch, $3.42; 
3-4-inch, $4.40; 1-inch, $6.35; 1 1-4-inch, 
$8.80; 11-2-inch, $10.75; 2-inch, $14.80. 

Enameled Ware— Competition is still 
keen and prices are still low, especially 
for "B" quality. We quote: "Stand- 
ard" 5 1-2 feet rolled rim, first quality, 
at $21.60; second quality, $15.50 to 
$16. 

Copper— A fair trade is reported in 
ingot, also an excellent movement in 
sheet copper. We quote in ton lots as 
follows: Ingot copper, $13.25 to $13.50, 
and sheet copper, $20 per 100 lbs. 

Brass— There is a fair trade, with the 
discount steady at 15 per cent. 

Lead— There is a good demand at un- 
changed prices. We quote $3.25 per 100 
lbs. for pig lead and $3.60 for bar lead. 

Zinc Spelter— Stocks are light. Buy- 
ing is active at 5 3-4 to 6c per lb. 

Solder— There is a fair trade. Prices 
are l-2c lower. We quote: Guaranteed 
half-and-half at 17 1-2 to 18c, and wip- 
ing 16 1-2 to 17c. 

Antimony— 7 1-2 to 8c per lb. 

Old Material— Business so far this 
year has not been quite up to the aver- 
age of other years. The market is still 
dull, with prices unchanged. Heavy cop- 
per and wire, 10 l-4c per lb.; light cop- 
per. 9 l-4c per lb.; heavy red 
brass, 9 l-4c per lb; heavy yellow brass, 
8 to 9c per lb; light brass, 5 to 5 l-2c 
per lb; lead, $2.50 per cwt; scrap zinc, 
3c per lb; iron, No. 1 wrought, $10; No. 
2 wrought, $3; machinery cast scran, 
$13; stoveplate, $10; malleable and steel, 
$4; old rubbers, 5c per lb; country mix- 
ed rags, 65c per 100 lbs. 

METALS. 

In iron and steel a comparatively 
strong situation is reported. Prices of 
pig iron continue to decline in the 
United States, and several of the 
smellers there have shut down. Compe- 
tition in Canada, however, does not 
seem keener, and prices are fairly well 
maintained. In steel a firm market has 
been the result of ap active demand. 
Sheet and ingot metals are selling well 
;it steady prices. 

Pig Iron— The slump in prices in the 
Tinted States continues, but offerings 
from that quarter in Canada are not 
larger. The demand in Canada is of a 
hand-to-mouth nature, but is of large 
volume. Prices are unchanged, but our 
quotations on Hamilton iron are 50c 



THE BANNER 
COLO BLAST 



LANTERN 



Always Leads. 
Great Light. 
Wind Proof. 

■ NOTE IMPROVEMENTS FOR SEASON 1904. ■ 

We make twelve different Styles of Lanterns in Tin, Antique Copper and Solid Brass. 

STANDARD LIGHT PRODUCERS. 

FOR SALE BY ALL PROMINENT JOBBERS THROUGHOUT THE DOMINION. 



ONTARIO LANTERN & L.AIVI 



CO., LIMITED 



WALTER GROSE, Selling Agent, 



MONTREAL. 




THE JOHN MORROW MACHINE 
SCREW COMPANY, Limited 

Manufacturers oi 
Set and Cap Screws, Speoial Milled Work, Engine Studs 
Etc. Cold Punched Nuti of every variety of finish 
INGERSOLL, ONT. 



DOIT 
NOW 



MANUFACTURERS WISHING TO BE 
REPRESENTED IN 

MANITOBA 



COMMUNICATE WITH 



DAVID PHILIP, Manufacturers' Agent 



References Furnished, 



470 Main St., Baker Block, WINNIPEC, MAN. 




SIMPLE— LIGHT— ACCURATE 



A new idea in mitre box construction. Will cut any width 
or depth of moulding at any angle, with any saw. 

Can be used on top of ladders, scaffold or any place a mitre 
box is required. 

Send for the Green Book of Hardware Specialties for price 
and description. 

SMITH ii HEMENWAY CO . UTICA DROP FORGE & TOOL CO,, 

Mfrs. of Mfrs. of 

Cutlery and Hardware Specialties Nippers and Plyers 

296 Broadway, NEW YORK. 
Canadian Sample Room : 215 Coristine Bldg., Montreal. 

Allen C. Jenkincj, Canadian Manager 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS Sharratt & Newth 

========== 43 and 44 Percival Street, - London, England 

Contractors to H. M. Government and the Principal English Sheet and Plate Glass Works. 
ALSO Established 1815 

Lead Vices, %.'$. ^'~V-L 

Carbon Tools, 
Etc , Etc , 

Agents for Canada: ^ Raffi-Say & S0I1, MOlltreal 



lower— a basis that has prevailed for 
some time. 

Middlesboro, f.o.b., Toronto .... $19 £•> 

Hamilton, No. 1 " $18 J5 to 18 50 

No 2 " 17 75 to 18 00 

No' 1 " 17 00 to 17 25 

Midland, No. 1 ' " 18 50 to 19 00 

•• No 2 " 18 00 to 18 50 

" No. 1 f.o.b. Midland 17 00 to 17 50 

Radnor, fob. furnaces.... •••• * "« 

Londonderry, f.o.b. furnaces 17 50 to 18 OU 

Bar Iron— Prices are fairly steady, 
thoueh competition for orders is 
keen. We quote $1.75 f. o. b. 

3G 



Toronto, with discount of 2 per cent. For 
extras as cut to length while rolling', 
2 feet and over, 10c per 100 lb.; 
1 foot and under 2 feet, 15c; under 1 
foot, 20c; over 20 feet by special agree- 
ment according to length and size. 

Steel— Prices are steady, with an ex- 
cellent trade doing. Quotations are as 
follows: Morton's "Self Hardening," 
60c; "Alpha," 70c; Morton's tool steel, 
14c; Jessop's high speed, 60c; Jessop's 



June 4, 1904 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



"Standard" tool, 14c; "Chas. Leon- 
ard, ' ' 8 to 9c ; Jessop 's best crucible 
sheet steel, 14c : Crucible Steel Co . 's 
"Black Diamond," 10 to lie; "Silver," 
13c; "Special." 17c; "Rex" high 
speed, 65 to 75c; "Self Hardening," 45 
to 50c 

Tin — There is still a good trade do- 
ing. As stocks are light, prices are 
firm at 29 1-2 to 30c. 

Galvanized Sheets— There is a good 
demand at unchanged prices. Quotations 
are as follows: Queen's Head, $4.25 for 
28 gauge ; American, $3.75 for 28 gauge ; 
Bell brand, $4.25 for 28 guage; Gordon 
Crown, $4.25 for 28 gauge. 

Tinplates— Considerable business has 
been done. Stocks are light. We quote : 
Coke plates, bright, 14x20, $3.10; 
charcoal plates, $4.25. 

Canada Plates — A fair demand is re- 
ported. A large quantity is being dis- 
charged at Montreal for delivery 
throughout Ontario. Prices are steady. 
We quote as below: All dull, $2.50; 
half-polished, $2.60; and all-bright, 
$3.50. _. flf| 

COAL. 

There is an excellent, trade doing. 
Prices are firm throughout . We quote : 
Anthracite, $5.25; bituminous for steam 
purposes, $2 to $4, according to qual- 
ity, f.o.b. Buffalo and bridges. 

PETROLEUM. 

The petroleum market continues fea- 
tureless, with trade quiet at last week's 
quotaions, which were as follows: Can- 
adian prime white, 18 l-2c; Canadian 
water white, 20c; American prime white, 
19c; American water white, 21 l-2c, ex- 
warehouse . 

Hides, Skins and Wool. 

Washed wool is commencing to come 
in and, from all appearances, it is in 
good condition. The hide market is 
quiet but firm. The calfskin season is 
pretty well over, but prices continue 
firm. Fleece wool, new clip, has ad- 
vanced lc per lb., and lamb skins are 
5c apiece higher. Unwashed wool is 
now bringing one price instead of two, 
as last week. We quote : 

HIDES. 

No. 1 green, per lb 08 

" 2 " " 07 

" 1 " steers, per lb 084 

2 " " " 074 

Cured, per lb 08$ 

CALFSKINS. 

Veal skins, K o. 1, 6 to » id, inclusive 11 

"2 " " " 09 

1 15 to 20 lb " 10 

2 " " 08 

Deacons (dairies), each 65 

Sheepskins 1 00 1 25 

Lamb skins 30 

WOOL. 

Unwashed wool, per lb 10 

Fleece wool, new clip, per lb 17 

Pulled wools, super, per lb 18 204 

extra " 20 22 



The name of the Dominion Steam 
Heating Co., Winnipeg, has been chang- 
ed to the John Plaxton Co., Ltd., and 
the capital stock has been increased 
from $24,500 to $50,000. 



TRADE CONDITIONS IN MARITIME 
PROVINCES. 

Sperial Correspondence of Hardware and Metal. 

Halifax, June 1, 1904. 

THE rush of Spring trade is now 
over, and business has settled 
down to about the usual Summer 
conditions. The volume of business is 
not expected to show much change until 
the Fall activity begins. The fishing 
industry, with which the hardware 
trade of this province is closely allied, 
is in a much more flourishing condition 
than at this date last year. I have just 
had reliable information from the Nova 
Scotia banking fleet now about complet- 
ing the Spring trip, and all the vessels 
that fished the northern grounds have 
made exceptionally good catches. At 
least twenty-five vessels reported have 
averaged 1,000 quintals each, some of 
them having reached as high as 1,300 
quintals. The vessels that fished south 
did not do so well, and I hear of some 
with only 400 quintals, but it is now 
certain that on the whole the Spring 
trip will be above the average . Prices 
for spot fish, ex vessel, run from $5.25 
to $5.50 per quintal, but of course it is 
too good to expect that these figures can 
be long maintained when the new cure 
comes along to take the edge off the 
market. The outlook for trade is there- 
fore good in those sections of the prov- 
ince in which fishing is a principal in- 
dustry. As an illustration of how near 
our people are to old Neptune, it may 
be said that the brother of the Premier 
of the province was a member of the 
crew of a sealing vessel which arrived 
here last week from a sealing voyage to 
the Falkland Islands. Mackerel are run- 
ning off the coast, and good stops were 
made on Saturday and Sunday, the 
weather being very favorable. 



The only market change of import- 
ance is in linseed oil, which since last 
report has been reduced three cents per 
imperial gallon. The present Halifax 
quotations are forty-seven cents for raw 
and fifty cents for boiled, in barrels, 
with extra five cents for smaller quan- 
tifies. There is no change in turpen- 
tine, but there is not much confidence 
in the market. Paint sales have been 
very large this season. This is prob- 
ably due to the fact that, owing to the 
high price of oils last year, a good deal 
of work was postponed until the pres- 
ent season . Building operations are 
active in this citv. The military have 




GROSSES «- FINIALS 

We make a most extensive 
variety of these ornamental 
lines — adaptable to all re- 
quirements of artistic finish. 

Made of copper or galvan- 
ized steel in most gracefully 
pleasing designs — they are 
both reliable and economical. 

A full set of illustrations 
shown in our catalogue. 

THE METALLIC ROOFING CO., 

whoi.:oale manfrs. umitw, 
toronto, canadai 



lately leased a large number of resi- 
dences, which will likely lead to the 
erection of additional houses, especial- 
ly in the north end. 



Mr. E. L. Fenerty, the Halifax shov- 
el manufacturer, had a narrow escape 
from death last week. With his wife, 
he was driving out the St. Margaret's 
Bay road, when a blast set off by the 
workmen on the new line of railway un- 
der construction caused a piece of rock 
to strike his horse, killing the animal 
instantly. Mr. Fenerty was thrown be- 
neath the horse's feet, and received a 
number of bruises. He will enter an 
action for damages against the construc- 
tion company. 

* * * 

The Dominion Chemical Co., of Syd- 
ney, have chartered a steamer to carry 
a cargo of pitch to Italy. The greater 
part of this company's output for the 
Summer months has been contracted for 

in advance. 

* * * 

At present writing the strained rela- 
tions between the Dominion Iron & 
Steel Co. and its employes are serious. 
To-morrow at midnight is the limit set 
by the men for the answer to their ulti- 
matum, demanding an increase of 
wages . 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



June 4, 1904 



PITTSBURG METAL MARKET. 

From The Iron Trade Review, June 2, 1904. 

Lower prices for pig iron and a num- 
ber of finished products have come in 
the pasl week and the iron market gives 
distinct evidence of the shrinking of de- 
mand into narrower channels. There 
are signs of preparation for a quiet 
Summer in the hanking or blowing out 
of a number of blast furnaces in the 
Central West, the Chicago district and 
in Pennsylvania, though as yet the Unit- 
ed States Steel Corporation has not par- 
ticipated in this movement apart from 
the stopping of several stacks of the 
Illinois Steel Co. There is no lack of 
ore in the yards id' the Steel Corpora- 
tion at South Chicago, hut other fur- 
naces in that district may have to cur- 
tail further if the lake strike lasts many 
weeks longer. The great majority of 
consumers of pig -iron have no con- 
tracts beyond the middle of the year, 
and ordinarily a brisk buying move- 
ment would he under way. But only in 
exceptional cases, and these where large 
contracts have been undertaken by the 
foundries, as in the cast iron pipe 
trade, are buyers in the market. (!en- 
eral business conditions have not chang- 
ed for the worse. Crop prospects show 
improvement, according to official re- 
ports of the week, and the supply of 
money is abundant . Hut hesitancy is 
dominant in manufacturing operations, 
and the iron and metal-working trades 
seem to be adjusting themselves to a 
wait that may be prolonged over sev- 
eral months. 

Reports from pig iron centres show 
that where any considerable business is 
inquired on new low prices come out . 
While $9.25, Birmingham, for Southern 
No. 2 iron is commonly the price, one 
or two large orders have been taken at 
$9. Though gray forge has been rela- 
tively scarce and for early delivery has 
been held firmly, $8 has been done on 
a good-sized order for the third quar- 
ter, while No. :i and No. 4 foundry sold 
at $8.75 and $8.50 respectively. A 10,- 

000 ton contract involving considerable 
amounts of Nos. .'i and 4 is reported 
from Cincinnati, and a Northern Ohio 
pipe concern has inquired for 12,000 
tons, ol which 2,000 tons has been 
placed. 

Chicago reports about 8,000 tuns of 
bar iron sold at lower prices. Orders 
for 1,350 cars placed in that district 
account for most of the activity in bars. 
In the Pittsburg district a bar iron con- 
tract is reported at about $2 below the 
recent basis. In wrought pipe the out- 
look is excellent, ganged by the demand 
due to pipe line work, a 20. 000 tun con- 
tract for Kansas being the latest devel- 
opment. It is understood that the year's 
programme of the leading buyer will 
call for far more than the 100,000 tons 
originally contemplated. In merchant 
pipe close competition continues, ami a 
reduction of a point has been made in 

1 he past week. Wil'e and wire nails 
have a weakening tendency, and the an- 
nouncement of lower prices is looked 



lor. Sheets are making new records, 
and as low as 2.10c at mill for No. 28 
was touched on an important contract 
in the past week. 

Pir Iron— Northern No. 2 is being 
freely offered at $13 Pittsburg, and on 
a desirable order $12.85 can be readily 
done. Gray forge is quoted at $12.75, 
but this can be shaded 25c a ton. One 
local concern last week purchased 1,700 
tons of foundry and forge iron for de- 
livery outside of this district . The iron 
is for delivery during June and July, 
the No. 2 foundry being placed close to 
$9 Birmingham, while the forge went 
at a trifle below $8.25 at the southern 
furnace. For June delivery, southern 
furnaces are now freely quoting +0.2.) 
Birmingham, and $0 could be done on a 
desirable tonnage. Owing to the heavy 
demand for forge iron on the part of 
the cast iron pipe interests, this grade 
is stronger than the fjoundry irons, and 
while it might be possible to do $8 Bir- 
mingham, the prevailing quotation is 
$8.25. There is no demand for steel- 
making irons, and quotations continue 
merely nominal at $12 to $12.15 Valley 
furnace. During the present month pig- 
iron production in the Valleys will be 
curtailed from 35 to 40 per cent., al- 
though no formal action to curtail out- 
put has been taken, nor will any be 
taken. We revise quotations as fol- 
lows: 

Bessemer, Valley $12 15 to $12 25 

Bessemer, Pittsburg 13 00 to 13 10 

No. 1 Foundry 13 25 to 13 50 

No. 2 Foundry 12 85 to 1300 

Grav torge, Pittsburg 12 50 to 12 75 

Chilled basic, Valley 12 00 to 12 15 

Chilled basic, Pittsburg 128510 1300 

Bars— An order for l.ooo tons of iron 
bars, placed this week, was closed at 
close to 1.30c Pittsburg, for assorted 
sizes. This price netted the mill about 
1.20c on common bars taking no extras. 
Current demand for both iron and steel 
bars continues light, while specifica- 
tions on existing contracts are by no 
means heavy. We quote: Bar iron;, 
1. 30c to 1.35c Pittsburg, for local de- 
livery, while foi western shipment quo- 
tations are based on 1.25c to l;30c 
Pittsburg. 

Structural Material— The Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad Co. is asking for bids 
on the structural work on its Duquesne 
Way elevated track. The construction 
of this elevated road will require 5,000 
tons of steel. Bids will he opened on 
June PC The Wabash has not yet 
closed for its South Side elevated 
tracks, requiring about 5,000 tons. We 
quote as follows: Beams and channels, 
3 to P") inches, 1.60c; IS to 24 inches, 
1.70c; tees, 1.65c; zees, 1.00c; angles, 
from 3 to 10 inches. 1.60c; universal 
mill plates, l.OOc. 

Pipes and Tubes— The Union Natural 
(las Corporation, of this city, will short- 
ly close for about 20,000 tons of line 
pipe for a gas line to extend from Inde- 
pendence, Kan., to Joplin and Kansas 
City. The demand for line pipe f,or gas 
and oil lines is heavier this year than 

:5H 



ever before in the history of the pipe 
trade. On steel merchant pipe competi- 
tion is keen and prices on all sizes, ex- 
cept 7 to 12 inches, have been reduced 
one point • 

Wire and Wire Nails— A new list on 
wire and wire nails is now looked for by 
the trade, carrying a reduction of $1 a 
Ion. Concessions on delivered prices 
from 40 to 60c a ton are being made . 
We make the following quotations: 
Wire nails, carload lots to jobbers, f. 
o.b. cars Pittsburg, are quoted $1.00 
base; plain ware, carload lots, $1.80 
base; barb wire, carload lots, $2.20 
base; staples, carload lots, $2.05 keg. 
Galvanized, 30c extra. Carload lots to 
retailers are held at 5c advance in all 
lines, and on less than carload ots a 
further advance of 10c is charged. Steel 
and iron cut nails, carload lots, $1.7."), 
and less than carload lots, $1.80 f.o.b. 
Pittsburg, plus freight to points of des- 
tination. Terms, 60 days, less 2 per 
cent . off in 10 days. 

Coke — The shipment of trainloads of 
coke to Chicago and Buffalo on consign- 
ment has resulted in heavy losses to 
the coke producers, and as a result a 
large number of ovens are being shut 
down. At Chicago consignment coke 
has sold as low as 40c a ton during the 
week and numerous sales were made at 
65 and 80c, the buyer of course paying 
the freight and demurrage charges. On 
contracts and current business $1.45 to 
$1.60 is quoted on furnace coke and 
$1 .85 to $2 on foundry. For the week 
ending Saturday, May 21. the produc- 
tion of the upper region amounted to 
210,795 Ions and thai of the lower 
Connellsville region, 55,078 tons. 

Sacrifice sales of coke shipped on con- 
signment have established record low 
prices in the week and curtailment in 
the coke regions seems inevitable. 



LONDON METAL MARKET. 

From The Metal Market Report June 3. 

Pig Iron— Scotch warrants, Glasgow, 
closed at 51s fid, a decline of 3d. Mid- 
dlesboro No. 3 foundry at 4:>s 4 l-2d, 
a decline of M . 

Tin— Spot tin opened steady at £122 
7s Oil. futures £122, and after sales of 
250 tons of spot and L50 tons of futures 
closed easy at £122 2s (id for spot and 
£121 15s for futures, making prices as 
compared with last week £2 lower on 
spot and £1 9s for futures. 

Copper — Spot copper opened easy ai 
£56 7s (id, futures £">7 7s (id, and after 
sales of 23 tons of spot and 50 tons 
of futures, closed easy at £56 12s (id for 
spot and £56 12s 6d for futures, making 
price as compared with last week 5s 
higher on spot and 2s 6d higher on fu- 
l nres . 

Lead — The market (dosed at til 18s 
Od, making price as compared with a 
week ago 5s lower. 

Spelter— The market closed at £22, 
making price as compared with last 
wee|< unchanged. 



June 4, 1904 



THE MARKEl* 



June 4, 1904 



BUSINESS CONDITIONS IN BRITISH 
COLUMBIA. 

Spee'al Correspondence of Hardware and Metal. 

Vancouver, B. C, May 28, L904. 

'V HROUGH dispatches from the east 

this week, the public have had 

* their interest, engaged once more 

by the Grand Trunk Pacific Railway. 

The point of interest is that the state- 
ment is positively made, that the rail- 
way will begin construction simultane- 
ously from the Pacific and from the 
east. This is not yet an official an- 
nouncement, but would seem to be an 
assurance privately from members to 
their supporters here. Aside from the 
general proposition of a second trans- 
continental line making a terminus on 
the tidewater in this province, the chief 
point is just this commencement of con- 
si ruct ion. Were the work not to begin 
from this end at the same time as from 
the east, there would be less friendly 
interest in the undertaking, if there 
would not develop active opposition. 
The advantages accruing from such con- 
struction have been pointed out fre- 
quently, and in fact they are very 
obvious. 

The lumber duty, or the movement to 
secure tire imposition of a duty on 
lumber, has been somewhat less prom- 
inent in the eye of the business public 
this week. After the decision to have 
representations made by delegates sent 
to Ottawa from the. leading cities for 
the purpose, the boards of trade have 
been making arrangements to have 
some of their members, now in the 
east, arrange to attend at Ottawa and 
press the matter. So far no definite 
news of any interview with the Govern- 
ment has been received, but all efforts 
1o have some strong representations, 
personally made, are being put forth. 

Northern trade is picking up material- 
ly. The shipments by outgoing steam- 
ers have increased so that the cargo 
space is beginning to be taxed fully. 
The City of Seattle, on its way to 
Skagway, had all she could take from 
here last night, and so valuable is 
space now that if shippers engage so 
many tons space it is charged to them 
whether they use it or not. The C. P. 
R. steamer Amur, which also sailed last 
evening, had a full cargo from this port. 
Local wholesale merchants have the 
whole of it to their credit. Another 
large northern shipment, for Dawson 
via St. Michaels and the Lower Yukon, 
went out on the steamer Olympia, which 
sailed on Thursday morning. She car- 
ried over 800 tons from here, and oyer 
95 per cent, of the goods were Canadian 
produce or Canadian manufacture. As 
an indication of the position in the 
trade of the Yukon, this is a pretty 
strong proof that the American in- 
vasion, which was such a prominent 
feature in the past, has become a thing 
of the past. It is worth noting by 
Canadian tool manufacturers that the 
shipments sent by the Dawson Hard- 
ware Co. were practically the only- 
goods not of Canadian manufacture 
which were shipped by this steamer. 
The reason for that has been stated in 
this column once before. The repre- 
sentatives of Dawson merchants assert 
that there is a demand for U. S. made 



shovels and mining tools because they 
are better adapted to the trade, partly 
on account of the percentage of Ameri- 
cans who are operating in the Yukon, 
and partly owing to the fact that the 
I . S. manufacturers seem to under- 
stand the requirements of mining tools 
better. There is, of course, to be con- 
sidered that Canadian manufacturers do 
not always find themselves in a position 
to accept orders, as they have enough 
on hand to keep them going. It is 
worth while, however, to see that 1 ben- 
is business which is going out of the 
country, and which is, of course, worth 

looking after. 

* * * 

The Pacific Coast SS. Co.'s steamer 
Umatilla took out from this port for 
San Francisco this week five cars of 
lead bullion from Kootenay smelters 
lor the Selby Refining Works. This 
bullion is beginning to go as freely as 
before refining was commenced at 
Trail. For a time there was a prac- 
tical cessation, and recently the ship- 
ments have begun again. It is to be 
noted in this connection that the lead 
mine owners are asking for the exten- 
sion of the lead bounty to ores and con- 
centrates shipped out of the country for 
refining, owing to the fact that it can- 
not all be treated bv present establish- 
ments. 

* * * 

The Canadian Pacific Railway an- 
nounces a restriction of its common- 
point rates on through freight ship- 
ments from the east. The rule will in 
future be that for the Kootenays, Ross- 
land and Nelson will be the only com- 
mon points. To other points in the in- 
terior served from those two cities, 
there will be charged the local rate 
plus the common-point rate. This 
practically gives Rossland and Nelson 
distributing centre advantages, and will 
have a tendency to increase the amount 
of jobbing done from those two cities. 
For freights from the east direct to 
customers it will be necessary to figure 
in future on the added local rate. Just 
what position it will place Revelstoke 
in as a distributing point from the 
main line of the C. P. K. south into the 
Kootenays, does not appear from the 
circular. Not long ago Revelstoke made 
a strong representation to Mr. F. W. 
Peters, general freight agent, for recog- 
nition as a distributing point, but no 
action is yet announced. 

In connection with the extension of 
the sewer system of the City of Van- 
couver, for which a special appropria- 
tion of $150,000 has been voted, there 
will be built seven new septic tanks to 
serve the trunk sewers in various parts 
of the city. There are now six septic 
tanks in operation in the city, and some 
of them have been several years in suc- 
cessful use. The system has been dem- 
onstrated a practical success here, and 
has attracted wide attention not only 
from cities and towns in the Northwest 
and Manitoba, where the disposal of 
sewage is a serious problem as centres 
of population expand, but from many 
cities in the United States. Numerous 
visitors from all over the continent 
have from time to time inspected the 
working of the system, and all have 
given their unqualified approval of the 
method. It is to be noted in this con- 



nection, that the situation of the City 
of Vancouver permits of easy access to 
salt water for the disposal of the efflu- 
ent, which practically harmless as n is 
would have, in other places inland, to 
be run on to large areas of land pre- 
pared as absorption beds, as the law 
prevents the deposit of sewage matter 
or any effluent from a sewer into a 
running stream from which water is 
taken. 

The announcement is made that the 
Great Northern Railway is to extend 
its branch from Jennings, Montana, to 
Fernie, in the Crow's Nest Coal Dis- 
trict. Surveyors are at work laying 
out the line and outfits for active con- 
struction are being assembled on the 
ground. The rumored extension of the 
present branch of the Great Northern 
line from the Boundary Country to the 
coast via the Fraser Valley, after 
crossing the Hope Mountains, is also 
currently discussed. 

* * * 

The big China Mutual steamer Hyson 
is in port discharging the very large 
quantity of Old Country merchandise of 
1 ,800 tons, the largest single arrival 
since the steamers of this line began to 
make this a regular port of call. The 
bulk of the imports, which are for local 
merchants, are hardware, iron, steel, 
chain, galvanized iron sheets, pig iron, 
fire brick and some cement. 

* * * 

In the City of Vancouver the greatest 
activity in building now prevails, the 
season being one of the busiest in the 
history of Vancouver's "growing time" 
of the past five years or more. 

In Victoria business men report some- 
what a reverse of the conditions which 
prevail in Vancouver. In the capital 
the retail trade is enjoying fairly pros- 
perous business, while the jobbing trade 
is quieter than usual at this season of 

the year. 

* * » 

In the interior, traveling men who 
have been making the trip say that 
everywhere there is activity and ex- 
pansion of the work of development. In 
addition to mining being very carefully 
and substantially pushed in many quar- 
ters, the lumbering industry has ex- 
perienced a great increase. The trade 
with Alberta is also very satisfactory. 
Up the coast the logging industry and 
the preparations for the salmon packing 
season are causing a very good volume 
of trade to flow to the cities of the 
coast. Every coasting steamer engaged 
in northern B. C. trade is doing all the 
business, both freight and passenger, 
that it can handle. 



HARDWARE BASEBALL CHAL- 
LENGE. 

The baseball team recently organized 
among the employes of Caverhill, Lear- 
mont & Co., is practising hard these 
days, so as to be ready to meet all 
coiners. They are coining out soon in 
grey sweaters tipped with maroon, and 
having a handsomely worked monogram 
of the same color. 



39 



Hardware and Metal 



THE MARKETS 



June 4, 1904 



CONDENSED OR "WANT" 
ADVERTISEHENTS. 



Advertisements under this heading, 2c. a word first 
insertion; lc. a word each subsequent insertion. 

Contractions count as one word, but five figures (as 
$1,000) are allowed as one word. 

Cash remittance to cover cost must accompany all 
advertisements. In no case can thisrule be overlook- 
ed. Advertisements received without remittance 
cannot be acknowledged. 

Where replies come to our care to be forwarded, five 
cents must be added to cost to cover postage, etc. 



BUSINESS CHANCES. 



A GOOD HARDWARE STORE and tinware 
business, with tinshop, in a progressive town, 
about i, ooo population; stock between $4,000 and 
85,000; good reason for selling. Address, Box 136, 
Hardware and Metal. (24) 



HARDWARE BUSINESS— About 84.000, in 
lareest mining town in New Ontario. For 
particulars address Home & Hardy, Copper 
Cliff. (24) 



SITUATIONS VACANT. 



BRASS FINISHER— Familiar with switchboard 
and other electrical work. Apply to Canadian 
General Electric Co., Peterboro', Ont. f 

BOILERMAKERS— A number of good men 
wanted. Apply stating wages, to The Goldie 
& McCulloch Co., Gait. f 



c 

&Co 



URRIERS wanted ; two good setters on har- 
ness ; piece or day work. Apply John Welsh 
Hastings, Ont. f 



EXPERIENCED tinners and cornice-makers ; 
good wages and steadv employment. Robert 
Hutton & Co., 112 East Fort St., Detroit, Mich, f 

FIRST-CLASS plumber and tinsmith ; steady 
job ; state wa°es, experience and references, if 
any, to Box B, Parry Sound. f 



MACHINIST— At once 
general repair work, 
ham, Ont. 



one who is good on 
W. G. Paton, Wing- 
f 



MACHINIST — Planer hand ; on engine and 
heavy machin^y ; permanent situation for 
good, steady, sober man ; state experience and 
wages. M. Beatty & Sons, Welland, Ont. f 

PAINTERS — Two brush hands; highest wages. 
Thos. Evans, Paris. f 

PAINTER — Wanted at once ; good brush hand ; 
steady work. L. Traver, Midland, Ont. f 



T 



INSMITH — At once ; state experience and 
salary, Box 136 Durham, Ont. f 



TTINSMITH— Good all-round hand. W. H. 
» Turnbull & Son, 99 Colborne street, Brant- 
ford, f 

THREE good tinsmiths ; for general work ; must 
be experienced men ; highest wages paid. 
Adam Hall, Peterborough, Ont. f 

TWO or three moulders ; for light work ; one 
stove-plate man ; union shop. G. Walter 
Green, Peterboro'. f 



HARDWARE CONDITIONS IN MANITOBA. 



BUSINESS in the city continues to 
move along brightly, and the 
prospects are good. Trade 
through the country shows much im- 
provement over the previous months, 
and the appearance of business generally 
is encouraging. 

The market practically holds the 
price list the same as was quoted in 
last week's report. We quote : 

Barbed wire, 100 lb 83 

Plain galvanized 6 to 8 



Plain galvanized 10 

12 

13 

14 

IS 

16 



No. 2 and larger 
Snow shoes, No. o to No. 1 . . 

No. 2 and larger . 
Steel, No. o to No. 1 

No. 2 and larger. 



Cut Nails— 

2d 1 in $4 10 

3d Fin. lYt in. . 4 10 

3d 1% in 3 75 

4d 1 'A in 3 50 

5d 1 K in 3 50 

6d 2 in 3 40 

8d 2% in 3 25 

tod 3 in 3 20 

2od 4 in 3 15 

3od 4K in 3 10 

40d 5 in 3 10 

5od 5% in 3 10 

6od 6 in 3 10 



Wire Nails — 

1 in 

i'A in 



1% 

iH 

2 

2H 

3 

3K 

4 

4« 

5 

5* 

6 



Bar iron (basis) 

Swedish iron (basis) 

Sleigh shoe steel 

Spring steel 

Machinery steel 

Tool steel, Black Diamond, ioolb. 
Jessop 



Sheet iron, black, 10 to 16 gauge, 100 lb. 

18 to 22 gauge 

24 gauge 

26 gauge 

gauge 

Galvanized Iron, Apollo, 16 gauge .... 

18 and 20 gauge 

22 and 24 gauge, 

26 gauge English or 28 American . . 

28 gauge 

30 gauge or ioJi oz 

Extra sheets, 36 in. wide an advance 
of 25 p. c. per 100 lb. 

Queen's Head, 24 gauge 

26 gauge 

28 " 

Extra sheets, 36-in. wide, an advance 
of 25 p.c. per 100 lb. 



IS 
3 39 

2 50 

3 5° 
3 10 
3 20 



3 9° 

4 45 
4 60 

IS 



Plain twist 

Staples 

Oiled annealed wire 10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

IS 

Annealed wires (unoiled) 10c. less. 

Horsenails, 40 per cent, discount. 

Horseshoes, iron, No. o to No 1 $4 75 



365 
3 42 
3 48 
3 56 
3 66 
3 76 
3 91 



4 45 
4 60 

4 45 
4 45 
4 20 



2 50 
4 75 

2 85 

3 25 
3 50 
8 50 

13 00 

3 5o 
3 75 

3 9° 

4 00 
4 10 

4 00 
4 00 
4 25 
4 25 
4 50 
4 75 



4 25 
4 50 
4 75 



Genuine Russian, per lb 

Imitation " " 

Tinned, 24 gauge, 100 lb 
26 gauge 



Tinplate, IC charcoal, 20 x 28, box 

IX 

IXX 
Ingot tin 



11 

07 to 08 

8 00 

8 50 

9 5° 
11 50 

13 50 
35 



3 co 


3 IS 


7 00 


7 5° 


5 5° 


3 30 


3 3° 


3 40 


3 75 


4 30 


6 25 


8 75 


10 50 


14 5° 


11 75 



Office of Hardware and Metal 

Room 308 Mclntyre Block, 

Winnipeg, May 30, 1904. 

Canada plate, 18 x 21, 18 x 24 and 20 x 28. 

Canada plate, full polished 

Sheet zinc, cask lots, 100 lb 

Broken lots 

Pig lead. 100 lb 

Black iron pipe, V% inch 

X " 

K " 

% " 

Black iron pipe, Ji inch 

\% " ::":::::::::::: 

1% " 

" 2 " 

Rope, sisal, 7-16 and larger, basis 

Manila, 7-16 and larger, basis 15 25 

Lathyarn JZ 2 c 

Solder 2 o 

Axes, chopping $ 6 75 to 12 00 

" double bitts 12 00 to 18 00 

Bluestone 5 2 e 

Screws, flat head, iron, bright 85 and 10 p.c. 

Round " " 8op.c. 

Flat " brass 75 and 10 p.c. 

Round" " 70 and 10 p.c. 

Coach 70 p.c. 

Bolts, carriage, 3-16 and # 60 p.c. 

5-16 and H 55 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and up 55 p.c. 

Bolts, machine, J-fj and under 50 and 5 p.c. 

7-16 and over 55 and 5 p.c. 

Bolts, tire 60 and 5 p.c. 

Bolt ends 55 and 5 p.c. 

Sleigh shoe bolts 70 p.c. 

Machine screws 70 p.c. 

Plough bolts 55 and 5 p.c. 

Square nuts, case lots 3c. discount. 

" small lots 2}<c. " 

Hex " case lots 3c. " 

" smaller lots 2&c. " 

Rivets, iron 50 and 10 p.c. 



Copper, No. 8. 
" No. 12 

Coil chain, 3-16 inch . . 
K inch 



5-16 inch 

H inch . . 

7-16 inch 

% inch . . . 

y% and \i inch. 



32 
36 

9« 

7« 

SK 
4* 
4* 
4 



Spades and shovels ...40 and 5 p.c. 

Harvest tools 60 p.c. 

*3 IS 

1 90 

1 60 

2 30 
1 60 



Axe handles, turned, s.g. hickory, doz. 

No. 1 

No. 2 

Octagon extra 

No.i 

Files common 70 and 10 p.c 

Diamond 60 p.c. 

Building paper : 

Anchor, plain 65c. 

" tarred 70c. 

Pure fibre, plain 67KC. 

" " tarred 80c. 

Ammunition, cartridges, Dominion R.F. 50 p.c. 

Dominion.C.F., pistol 30 p.c. 

" military...... 15 p.c. 

American R.F 30 p.c. 

C.F. pistol 5 p.c. 

C.F. military 10 p.c. advance. 

Loaded shells : 

Eley's soft, 12 gauge black 

chilled, 12 gauge 

soft, 10 gauge 

chilled, 10 gauge 



15 00 

16 00 

18 00 

19 00 

Shot , Ordinary, per 100 lb 6 00 

Chilled : 650 

Powder, F.F., keg 475 

F. F.G 5 00 

Tinware, pressed, retinned 70 and 10 p.c. 

" plain 75 and 2% p.c. 

" pieced 

Japanned ware 37 % p.c. 

Enamelled ware, white 45 p.c. 

Famous 50 and 10 p.c. 

Imperial 50 and 10 p.c. 

Green Wire Cloth 1 55 



40 



June 4, 1904 



THE MARKETS 



Hardware and Metal 



PETROLEUM. 

Water white American 27 'Ac. 

Prime white American 25 Vi c. 

Water white Canadian 2554c. 

Prime white Canadian 2454 c. 

SCRAP. 

No. 1 cast iron $14 to J 5 

No. 2 " 7 

Wrought iron scrap 5 

Copper (heavy) 854 0. per lb 

Yellow brass (heavy) 7%c. " 

Light brass 5c. to 6c. " 

Lead pipe, or tea lead 2c. to 2 He. " 

Zinc scrap ic. " 

PAINTS, OILS AND GLASS. 

White lead $6 00 to $6 50 

Putty in bladder, 2K lb., in keg of 100 lbs. o 02K 
Turpentine, pure, in barrels $ o 97 

Less than barrel lots 1 02 

Linseed oil, raw 052 

Boiled o 55 

WINDOW GLASS. 

Single 1st break, up to 25 miled inches, $3.50; 26 
to 40, I3.75; 41 to 50, $4.25; 51 to 60, $4.75; 61 to 
70, $5.25, in 100-ft. boxes. 
Lubricating oils, heavy castor machine. ... o 29 

" extra engine 027 

" dynamo o 35 

" black 021 

" cylinder $0 50 to o 75 

(as to quality) 

Harness oil o 50 to o 60 

Neatsfoot oil 1 00 

Vegetable oil, 1st pressure 1 00K 

" 2ndpressure 1 09*4 



IRON AND STEEL STRIKE. 

The eighteen hundred employes of 
the Dominion Iron & Steel Co. have 
gone on strike, and the works are prac- 
tically tied up. It is said that the 
strike may involve the Dominion Coal 
Co., and if the employes of this firm 
went out it would be more serious than 
in the case of the Iron & Steel Co. It 
is thought that the closing down of the 
works is not so serious for the company 
as it would have been had more favor- 
able conditions existed in the iron trade. 
As conditions are at present the direc- 
tors do not see their way clear to raise 
the wage scale, as demanded. 



C. H. Westwood & Co., whose build- 
ing was destroyed in the recent Toronto 
fire, have made all arrangements for re- 
building on the site of their old prem- 
ises, at 72 Bay street. 



STRUCTURAL STEEL WORK. 

The Hamilton Bridge Works have un- 
der way several good contracts. They 
are installing a steel roof on the Berlin 
Gas Works; erecting steel buildings for 
the Canadian Westinghouse Co.; put- 
ting up steel structures for the Belle- 
ville Cement Works at Point Anne, near 
Belleville; building a power house for 
the Canadian Niagara Power Co. The 
firm also have nine highway bridges, 
with reinforced concrete floors. 



"Matchless Treasure" 

RANGE 

RETURN- 

4=Hole Coal or 
F*"*Y Wood Range 




eet Steel Oven, Duplex Grate, 
i^keled Steel Edges, "Never-Break" 
lem Base. 

A splendid baker, moderate in 
price, and economical on the fuel. 

EVERY "MATCHLESS TREASURE" GUARANTEED. 

THE D. MOORE COMPANY, HAMILTON 



MANITOBA DEPOT. 



ninnimir 



MERRICK, ANDERSON & CO., 



117 Bannatyne St. East, 



Winnipeg 




The Greatest Seller 
in the Paint Line 



Write us for new prices. 



MANUFACTURED BY 

G. F. STEPHENS & CO., LIMITED 

170. 172. 174, I/O MarKet Street. - 'WINNIPEG. CANADA. 

41 



Hardware and Metal 



June 4, 1904 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Dead Surface Varnish Media. 

IN" certain kinds of decorative work 
there is a constant demand for a 
medium with which to mix pig- 
ments, which will enable the latter to 
dry with a dead non-lustrous surface, 
says the Review. Such media are usu- 
ally obtained by dissolving paraffin 
wax or beeswax in a suitable solvent. 
The three media most in use at the 
present time are Parry's medium, which 
consists of gum elemi in turps and oil 
of spike in which is dissolved a small 
quantity of white wax. To the mixture 
so formed copal oil varnish is added un- 
til the requisite binding consistency is 
obtained. Church recommends 4 ounces 
of paraffin wax in 12 fluid ounces of 
turpentine. The mixture is heated until 
dissolved, and to it is added 16 fluid 
ounces of oil copal varnish, the whole 
being then warmed and shaken together. 
Lourie suggests the use of beeswax in 
place of paraffin wax in the above. 
Diluting media in such mixtures are 



turpentine, oil of spike and certain pe- 
troleum fractions. 

Benzine Tests. 
Benzine is often adulterated with pe- 
troleum oil, in which case it gives off a 
disagreeable and persistent odor. A 
method of recognizing the fraud consists 
in placing a small piece of pitch in the 
suspected benzine, which, when the ben- 
zine is adulterated, will soon be dis- 
solved, but will color the liquid less on 
account of the presence of the petroleum 
oil, says Oil and Colourman's Journal. 
To judge with certainty, it is well to 
examine the benzine by comparison 
with a type of standard purity (benzol). 
Benzine can be distinguished from ben- 
zol in the following way : Benzine is 
colored violet by a crystal of potassium 
iodide, while benzol is colored carmine. 
If to two cubic centimetres of benzine 
three or four drops of a clear ether so- 
lution of sandarach (1— 10) are added, a 
persistent cloudiness is produced in the 



benzine, while with benzol, treated in 
the same way, the cloudiness will soon 
pass away. Finally, if the benzol is 
shaken with a drop of alcohol, it will 
become clouded, while the benzine wijl 
remain clear. 

A New Use for Glue. 

An application for burns can be made, 
il is said, by taking fifteen ounces of 
the best glue, breaking it into small 
pieces and adding two pints of water. 
This having become soft, should be dis- 
solved by means of a water bath; two 
ounces of glycerine and six drachms of 
carbolic acid should be added, and the 
heat continued until the whole is thor- 
oughly dissolved. On cooling this mix- 
ture hardens to an elastic mass, covered 
with a shining Darchment-like skin, and 
, may be kept for any length of time. 
When required for use it is placed for a 
few minutes in a water bath until suffi- 
ciently liquid, and apnlied by means of 
a brush. Jn about two minutes it forms 
a shining, smooth, flexible and nearly 
transparent skin. 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 




THE SPRAMOTOR 

is recognized by the users as the most durable and 
efficient apparatus yet invented, for the 

Prevention of blight and bugs on fruit and potatoes. 

For the destruction of wild mustard in the grain 
crops without injury to the grain, and for 

The painting of buildings. 

Has been awarded First Place by the Canadian Gov- 
erment in actual contest, and 

The Oold Medal at the Pan-American. 

The Trade fully protected. 

Write for particulars and discounts. Terms liberal. 

THE SPRAMOTOR CO., 



68-70 King St.. 



LONDON, CAN. 






J*B!J* 




You can get Paint at almost any 
price. This does not apply 
to Hollywood, as it is fixed 
in price as it is in quality. 

Being designed to give entire satisfaction to 
the most critical customer, it is as low in price as 
it is possible to get a thoroughly reliable article. 

Hollywood Paste, Ready=Mixed «* Floor Paints 

They wear on the job, not off it. 



The Imperial Varnish & Color Co. 

LIMITED, 

TORONTO, ONTARIO, CANADA. 



42 



June 4, 1904 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



McArthur. Corneille & Co. 



lu 



MONTREAL 

and Gelatine 



An extensive assortment, to suit all requirements. 
WILL BE PLEASED TO SUBMIT SAMPLES AND PRICES 



MANUFACTURERS AND IMPORTERS OF . 



"^ 



White Lead, Oils and Colors, 
Prepared Paints, Window 
Glass, Varnishes, Etc. 



SELLING AGENTS IN CANADA 



For the GENUINE 

imperial French Green 

of JOHN LUCAS & CO., 

PHILADELPHIA. 



And CELEBRATED 

English Varnishes 

of CHAS. TURNER & SON, 
LONDON. 



Please mention Hardware and Metal when writing. 




GILLETT'S LYE 

— IS GOOD FOR— 

Engineers 

As a Boiler Cleaner and Anti-lncrustator. 
DID YOU KNOW THIS? 

Sell Gilletts Lye 

— TO 



ineers. 



E. W. GILLETT COMPANY LIMITED 

TORONTO 




The Best 



REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

Gilt Edge 

650 FT. 

Gold Leaf 

600 FT. 

Silver Leaf 

550 FT. 

Maple Leaf 

500 FT 




lem 



FOUR MAPLE LEAF BRANDS 
HI GH GRADE BINDER TWINE 

Best in Quality. 

Product of Canadian Industry. 
Growing in Popularity. 



—For the Dealer to buy to sell 

BECAUSE 

— For the Farmer to buy to use. 

ENQUIRIES RECEIVE PROMPT ATTENTION 

The Brantford Cordage Co.,— Brantford, Ont. 



41? 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



June 4, 1904 



* 



Paint and Oil MarKets 



t 



Quebec. 



Office of Hardware and Metal, 
232 McGill Street. 

Montreal, June 3, 1904. 



'"TMIE Hurry in paris gn 
X lias been a feature 



reen, wliieh 
re of the 
market for the last two or 
three weeks, seems to be subsid- 
ing. It has been suggested that the 
potato hugs have struck against the 
"open" bucket, and have refused to 

< ie to the surface to be annihilated. 

Whatever the cause, business in paris 
green is very quiet. One well-known 
jqbber remarked to Hardware and Me- 
tal this week, that this has been the 
poorest year for paris green sales that 
he has ever experienced. The real ex- 
planation is that the severe Winter and 
late opening of Spring have made every- 
thing backward. 

General business is brisk, and values 
throughout are fairly well maintained. 
Dry colors and colors ground in oil and 
in japan are in active request, and a 
good movement is noted in varnishes 
and japans. Turpentine and linseed oil 
are unchanged in price, but, as stated 
last week, neither item is particularly 
strong. General supplies of,' paints and 
oils seem fairly ample, and there is no 
complaint of delays, as in former sea- 
sons. Some houses have been working 
overtime in order to keep up with their 
orders, as retailers have been asking for 
immediate delivery. We ((note: 

Ground White Lead— Best brands, 
Government standard, $4.50; No. 1 
$4.25 to $4.40; No. 2, $4 to $4.10; No. 
3, $3,671-2 to $3,771-2; No. 4, $3.30 
to $3.40, all f.o.b. Montreal. 

Dry White Lead— $4 in casks and in 
kegs $4.25. 

Dry White Zinc— Pure dry, in casks, 
Gc; in 100-lb. kegs, (i l-2c; No. 1 zinc, in 
casks, 5c; in 100-lb. kegs, 5 l-2c. 

White Zinc (ground in oil) —Pure, 25- 
lb. irons, 7 l-2c; No. 1, 6 l-2c; No. 2, 
5 l-2e. 

Putty— Bulk, in barrels. $1.40; in 
25-lb. tins and irons. $1.70; bladdered 
putty in barrels, $1.05. 

Orange Mineral— Casks, 7c; 100-lb 
kegs, 71-4c; smaller quantities, 81-4c. 

Red Lead — Genuine red lead in casks, 
$4; in 100-lb. kegs, $4.25; in less quan- 
tities, $5.25 per 100 lbs. No. 1 red 
lead, casks, $2.75; kegs, $4, and smaller 
quantities $5. 



Litharge — Ground, casks, 5c; in less 
quantities, 51-2c; flake litharge, casks, 
$5; smalls, $5.50 per 100 lb. 

Turpentine— Single barrels, 85c per 
gallon; 2 to 4 barrels, 84c per gallon. 
Smaller quantities than barrels, 90c per 
gallon. Standard gallon of 8.6 lbs. 

Linseed Oil— Raw, 1 to 4 barrels, 43c; 
5 to 9 barrels, 42c ; boiled, 1 to 4 bar- 
rels, 46c; 5 to 9 barrels, 45c. Delivered 
in Ontario between Montreal and Osh- 
awa at 2c per gallon advance. 

Shellac Varnish— Pure white, $2.80 to 
$3; pure orange, $2.75 to $2.85; No. 1 
orange, $2.45 to $2.60. 

Mixed Paints— $1.20 to $1.40 per gal- 
lon. 

Castor Oil— 8 3-4 to 9 l-4c in whole- 
sale lots, and l-2c additional for small 
lots. 

Canadian Paris Green — Barrels, 
14 l-4c ; arsenic kegs, 14 l-2c ; 50 and 
100 lb drums, 15c ; 25-lb drums, 15 l-4c : 
1-lb packages, 16c; 1-2-lb packages, 
18c; 1-lb tins, 17c. Terms 2 per cent, 
discount for cash in 30 days or 90 days 
net. 

English Paris Green— Barrels. 141-4c; 
arsenic kegs, 14 l-2c ; 50 and 100 lb 
drums, 15c per lb ; 25 lb drums, 15 l-2c ; 
1-lb paper boxes, 16c; 1-lb tin boxes, 
17c. Terms, 2 per cent, 30 days; 90 
days net. 



Ontario. 

office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front street east. 

Toronto, June i, 1904 

REDUCTIONS in both linseed oil 
and turpentine are reported this 
week, the decline being 2c in each 
case. A good business has been done 
this week. Early in the week orders 
were small, but came in from all quart- 
ers. The disagreeable weather has 
probably stopped much painting, but 
letailers seem to be using their time to 
look over their stocks, and a good busi- 
ness has in consequence continued. 
With the exception of turpentine and 
linseed oil, materials are unchanged in 
price . 

White Lead— Ex-Toronto, pure white 
lead, $4.65; No. 1, $4.20; No. 2, $3.90; 
No. 3, $3.50; No. 4, $3.25 in packages 
of 25 lb and upwards; l-2c per lb extra 
will be charged for 12 1-2-lb packages ; 
genuine dry white lead, in casks, $4.50. 

Red Lead — Genuine in casks of 560 
lb, $4.25; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb, 
$4.50; No. 1, in casks of 560 lb, $3.75 
to $4; ditto, in kegs of 100 lb, $4.25. 

White Zinc— Genuine, French V.M., 
in casks, $6 to $6.25; Lehigh, in casks, 
$6 to $6.25. 

Shingle Stain— In 5-gallon lots, 60 to 
85c per gallon. 

Paris White -90c to $1 per 100 lb. 

Whiting— 60 to 65c per 100 lb: Gild- 
ers' whiting, 75c. 

Shellac — Pure orange, in barrels, 
$2.50 to $3; white, $2.50 per gallon; 
No. 1, $2,371-2, including price of can. 

Linseed Oil — Our quotation ';: Raw, 
1 to 4 bbls, 41c; boiled, 44e; 5 to 9 
bbls, raw, 40c; boiled, 4He, Toronto, 
Hamilton, London, Elora and Guelph, 
net 30 days. Advance of 2c for deliv- 
ery to outside points. Another quota- 
tion is: Raw, 1 to 4 bbls, 43c; boiled, 
46c; 5 to 9 bbls, 42c; boiled, 45c; 10 




^■W-iiSSj 




Sand us a post card 

and let us tail you 

all about them. 



TRADE WINNERS. 

That's what you'll find 

ANCHOR and 

ENGLISH 

LIQUID PAINTS 

They not only win trade, but they 
hold it. 

They are the only ready-mixed paints 
made in Canada that contain Brandram's 
B. B. Genuine White Lead — standard 
of the world. 



HENDERSON & POTTS, Limited, Halifax. 
HENDERSON & POTTS CO., Limited, Hontreal. 




June 1, 1904 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



DON'T GO GROPING 
AROUND in the DARK 




BUT BRIGHTEN 

UP YOUR 

STORE 

AND 

FACTORY 
BY USING 



^ 4»^»% J.A^A^ AAAAAA^^A^.^AA t* 



LUXEER 




LLXEER 


SIDEWALK 


ana 


WINDOW 


PRISMS 




PRISMS 



LUXFER. PRISM CO., 

100 King St. W., TORONTO. 



LIMITED 



4 
~j 
4 

4 
4 

^ 

4 

-w 

4 
4 
4 

4 

4\ 



4 

4\ 
4 
4 
4\ 
4 
4 
•J 



The Auer 
Gas Lamp. 

"TURNS NIGHT-TIME 
INTO DAY-TIME." 

New Styles. Lower Prices. 

Are you interested in a lamp 
which gives ioo candle 
power ? 

Are you interested in light 
ing your sioie brilliantly? 
You know it draws trade ? 

Are you interested in saving 
half of your bill for coal oil ? 

Are you interested in having 
the agency for a lamp 
which does this ? 




No. 28 
100 Candle Power. 



Then write for our Catalog ue and Discounts. 



EVERY LAMP GUARANTEED. 



AUER LIGHT CO., 1682 NOTRE DAME ST., MONTREAL. 






A •j k Vi k i*irviriri k irirwYT¥¥i'iri k '» 



- 



A Weatherable Paint for Out=of = Doors ^/V* 

A Washable Paint for Inypoofs 

STERLING PAINTS ^ 

To be recommended wherever a new surface is required 

on the face of things. 

CANADIAN OIL COMPANY, Limited 

Scott and Front Sts., TORONTO. 



Hardware and Metal 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



June 4, 1904 




VARNISH 



will make 




A 
SUNNY 
HOME! 

It may not generally be known 
that the 



CANADA 

PAINf 

COMPANY 



LIMITED 



have one of the largest and most com- 
plete varnish plants in' the Dominion 
of Canada Their varnish premises 
in Toronto have an area of two 
acres If you are desirous of 
extending your varnish trade 
address 

The CANADA PAINT 
COMPANY , Limited 

Montreal 

k or J 

L Toronto. A 



barrels and over open, ex-Toronto, 2 
per cent, off 30 days. 

Turpentine— Single bbls, 81c; 2 to 4 
bbls, 80c; 5 bbls and over, f.o.b. point 
of shipment, net 30 days. Another quo- 
tation is: Single bbls! 84 l-2c; 2 to 4 
bbls, 83 l-2c ; 5 bbls, and over, open ex- 
Toronto with 2 per cent, off 30 days. 
For less quantities than barrels, 5c per 
gallon extra will be added, and for 5- 
gallon packages, 50c and 10-gallon pack- 
ages 80c will be charged. 

Glues— Broken sheet, in 200-lb bbls, 
8 to 81-2c per lb; cabinet glue, in bbls. 
11 1-2 to 12c; emery glue, in bbls, 17c; 
bookbinders', ground, 101-2c; finest 
American, white, 19c; No. 1 American 
white, 15c per lb. 

Putty— Common, $1.65; pure (linseed 
oil) bladders in barrels, +1.70; bladders, 
in KlO-lb kegs, $1.85; bulk in barrels, 
$1.45; bulk, less than barrels and up to 
1 00-lb., $1.70. 

Plaster Paris— New Brunswick, $2 
per bbl . 

Liquid Paints— Pure, $1.20 to $1.40 
per gallon; No. 1, $1.10 per gallon. 

Barn Paints — 55 to 70c per gallon. 

Bridge Paints— 75c to $1. 

Castor Oil— English, in cases, 71-2 to 
8c per pound, and 8 1-2 to 9c for single 
tins. 

English Paris Green — Petroleum 
bbls, 131-4c; arsenic kegs, 131-2c; 50 
to 1 00-lb drums, 14c; 1-lb packages. 
15c; 1-lb tins, 16c; 1-2-lb tins, 18c. 

Canadian Paris Green (present deliv- 
ery)— Petroleum bbls, 13 3-4c; arsenic 
kegs, 14c; 50 and 100-lb drums, 14 l-2e; 
1-2-lb tins, IS l-2c. 

St. John, N.B. 

The price in Nova Scotia is usually a 
little lower than in New Brunswick, ow- 
ing to the low water freights from Bos- 
ton, which makes increased competition. 
Some few weeks ago prices there were 
reduced lc, and last week, in sympathy 
with this, the local quotation was 
marked down lc. Dealers claim, how- 
ever, that the only reason for this is the 
keen competition, and that otherwise 
the market is a very firm one. There 
continues to be a steady demand. The 
busiest season in lubricating oil is over, 
as far as booking orders is concerned. 
Prices are held firm, while shipments 
are being freely made. 

Linseeds continue low, with rather 
less sale. Turpentine, which has been 
quoted very high for some time, is rather 
lower. In fish oils, while the season is 
yet early, a rather easy market is an- 
ticipated. 

Window Glass. 

MONTREAL. 

There is an active trade in glass. We 
quote: First break. 50 feet, $1.70; sec- 
ond break. $1.80 lor 50 feet. First 
break, 100 feet, $3.25; second break, 
$3.45; third break. $3.95; fourth break. 
$4.20. 



nominally as follows: Star, first 
break at $3.30 ber 100 feet and Double 
Diamond, first break, at $5.10. Dis- 
count, 15 and 20 per cent. 



Trade Enquiries 



Government Enquiries. 

The names of the firms making theBe enquiries, together 
with their addresses, may be obtained from the Department 
of Trade and Commerce, Ottawa, by quoting office under 
which the enquiry appears and giving number. 

CANADIAN HIGH COMMISSIONER, LONDON. 

76. A gentleman with experience of 
the London market and of the. South 
African trade, desires to obtain the rep- 
resentation of a few Canadian manufac- 
turers, more especially in bank, church 
and office furniture, joinery and bent 
wood . 

77. A Canadian gentleman resident in 
London is looking out for agencies on 
commission or otherwise for Canadian 
exporters. 

CURATOR, CANADIAN SEC. IMPERIAL 
INSTITUTE. 

15. A tanning company in the North 
of England invites correspondence from 
Canadian shippers of hides. 

16. Inquiry is made for the names of 
Canadian manufacturers who are in a 
position to supply materials for offiee- 
top desks which would subsequently be 
fitted up on this side. 

17. A firm of heating engineers is 
prepared to hear from Canadian manu- 
facturers of heating appliances suitable 
for this market. 



TORONTO. 




A geed trade in window nhiss 


and a 


fairly good business in plate and 


orna- 


menial glass is reported. We 


quote 


46 





PERSONAL MENTION. 

Mr. Harry Walker, late of Fort 
Dodge, la., is now manager of Robt. 
Home's hardware business at Copper 
Cliff, Ont. 

Air. C. F. Cragg, of Cragg Bros. & 
Co.. Halifax, N. S., has returned from 
a six weeks' business trip as far west 
as Winnipeg. 

Mr. H. Valliers, who was formerly 
with the Canada Hardware Co., and 
lately managing a retail hardware store 
in Quebec, has taken a position as city 
traveler with Lewis Bros. 

Mr. W. A. Wood, ol Cavcrhill, Lear- 
monl & Co., is taking a holiday this 
week, the occasion being his marriage 
i" an estimable young ladv in the west, 
lie was presented with a handsome cut- 
lery cabinet by his fellow employes be- 
fore he left. 

Mr. George .1. Rogers, of Charlotte- 
town, I'. E. 1., was a caller at the 
.Montreal office of Hardware and Metal 
on Tuesday. Mr. Rogers is connected 
witli the Rogers Hardware Co., (form- 
erlv Dodd & Rogers), a firm well known 
to the Maritime Province readers of 
this paper. He was forced to give up 
active work some time ago, but after a 
long holiday he is returning to Char- 
lottetown with a renewed energy which 
should make business hum. Mr. Rogers 
speaks very highly of Hardware and 
Metal, which he has read for several 
years. 



Jvne 4, 1904 



PAINT, OIL AND BRUSH TRADES 



Hardware and Metal 



Rr TUODMir 768 Craig St., 
. C. InUnnc, Montreal 

Wholesale Agent and Importer 

Dry Colors, Ochres, Bronze Powders, 
Aluminum Powder, Schlag Metal, 
Bronze Liquids and Varnishes. 

Toronto Office— 29 Mellnda St. 



The QxiicKest 

Selling Metal Polish 

is the usual remark of the trade 
when you ask them about 

SOLARINE 

It satisfies or your money hark. 
Write for sample order. 




SOLARINE DEPOT, TORONTO. 



Bronze Powders 

COLD PAINTS, when wanted, can be 
quoted at very low prices to the trade, by 

GEO. RIDOUT £.■> CO., Agents, Toronto 

Memorial Windows 

UNEXCELLED 
DOMESTIC ART GLASS 

H. E. St, George, London, Ont, 



McCaskill, Dougall & Co. 

Manufacturers RAILWAY, CARRIAGE AND BOAT VARNlSHES. 

»• HIGH GRADE FURNITURE and HOUSE VARNISHES. 

MONTREAL 



Get, your GLUES from 

The GROVE CHEMICAL CO., Limited, 

Appley Bridge, Lanes , England. 

Our ordinary grades are better than ordinary, and we can supply special makes for 
special purposes. SCOTCH GLUES, BOX GLUES, COLOGNE GLUES for Paper 
Makers. SIZE of all kinds. Send your name for our printed matter. 



TRADE 




MARK 



JVobles Sf Moare. 

CORNWALL ROAD STAMFORD STREET. 

LONDON, ENG. 

Manufacturers oi 

HIGH-CLASS VARNISHES ONLY 

Which can be obtained direct from the -works 
or from the principal Color Dealers in Canada 



RETURNED 
OCT 22 190*1 




"OUSE LONO'itU" 



vE^P 



"* WHITE LEAD VAB"" 

sr Patrick sTRfc' 1 ' 

This is the home of the "ISLAND CITY" Paint and Varnish Works. 

P. D. DODS &. CO., Montreal, Toronto, Vancouver 



Wagner s Carriage Paints 



Prepared Ready for the Brush. 
Quick Drying. 
Varnishing Unnecessary. 
Quarts, Pints, Half-Pints. 



Quality and Durability absolutely unequalled. 

Explicit directions. 

Any inexperienced person can do the work. 



Excellent also for Painting Store Fronts, Lawn and Porch Chairs, Settees, Furniture, Window Sash. Iron Fences and Railings, 

Flower Pots, Boats, Etc. 

A paint that the hardware dealer can recommend without reservation — the best general purpose paint made. 

Quarts, Pints, Half-Pints. Write for Prices. 

STANDARD PAINT & VARNISH CO., Limited 

WINDSOR, ONTARIO. 



47 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



t% ^V^»*fc M^ V^Ofr ^n i 



Window and Interior Displays 



0l^^f^^^^$t^^0I^R^ft^t^t0^ff^ 



Timely Hints ! f 
and Suggestions 



WI 



The Lack of Taste. 

HEN a merchant displays 
Lttle interest in his win- 
low, he often hides be- 
lind the fact that he has 
no laste for window 
dressing, that is, that he has none of 
the artistic qualifications that show 
themselves in first-class windows. As is 
the ease in most of the causes to which 
the unprogressive merchant assigns his 
unattractive windows, it is a character- 
istic which he does not endeavor to 
overcome. He really thinks it is so, 
and blames this rather than lack of ef- 
lort on his part. 

It may be true enough in some cases 
that a merchant doing his very best 
would make his windows look like a 
store-room, or would be utterly unable 
to acquire the desired effect. Such a 
man is, however, deprived of all excuse 
by the fact that his clerk, or one of 
them, is not likely to be as inartistic as 
he is. If so, it simply shows that a 
new clerk is required. Windows must be 
dressed even if the old staff must be dis- 
missed and a clerk with some ideas of 
arrangement be engaged. However, it 
is so very seldom that the merchant is 
as bad as he says, that it only re- 
quires some effort and push on his part 
lo convince himself that if not a born 
artist, he has some eye for effect, and 
at least the ability to arrange articles 
neatly. 

Neatness is essential to the effective 
display, and a window in which it is a 
prominent feature is sure to have its at- 
tractions, although perhaps not so well 
arranged as if by an experienced window 
dresser. Willi time, too, he will im- 
prove his eye for beauty and the ease 
with which he will think of designs. Am- 
bition and practice is all that is neces- 
sary to make a fair window dresser. out 
of any man. 

Observe Detail. 

Although a large pari of the work in 
connection with window dressing is the 
formation of a plan to be followed in 
the arrangement, it is not by any means 
all that requires close attention. Any 
clerk in the store may be capable of sug- 
gesting excellent ideas to the window- 
dresser, but only the latter can 'be de- 
pended upon to carry out the idea in a 
l, a t will give the besl icsults. 



In the actual arrangement the time 
spent on detail is of great consequence. 
The general plan may be closely follow- 
ed without obtaining a good effect, 
whereas the same plan may be made 
much more attractive by observing what 
would be usually called the unimport- 
ant part of the display. 

Exposed framework may not interfere 
with the intended design, but it utterly 
ruins the value of the window. The plan 
is almost always general in its charac- 
ter, and, however good, may be spoiled 
by the filling in. The slant of one prom- 
inent article, the introduction of too 
many objects, or neglect to conceal a 
rough framework may rob the display of 
most of its value, however cleverly con- 
ceived the plan may be. Many of these 
faults may be avoided by a close inspec- 
tion of the window from the street. 

An Honest Window. 

A point that must be observed in 
every window display is that the goods 
shown must be of the same class as 
the stock carried. An excellent 
quality must not be displayed in the 
window and the customer served from 
an inferior quality. The window is sup- 
posed to advertise just what is for sale 
inside, and the merchant who attempts 
to manage his business on a different 
principle will find a readily suspicious 
public will pass his store. A customer 
is ever willing to suspect that the 
goods he buys are inferior to those 
which benefit from their attractive ar- 
rangement in the window, and any proof 
of the existence of such a state of 
affairs will be magnified and turn away 
the trade of any one who discovers it. 

It will often be found necessary to 
compare the two lines of goods, and no 
reticence should be shown, if a cus- 
tomer desires it, in removing the article 
shown in the window in order to prove 
that what is on the shelves is the same 
in quality. Nor should the window- 
dresser he allowed to select all the best 
for the window, unless it is plainly 
shown to every inquirer that the goods 
in the window form the complete stock, 
and are for sale. A single case of an 
attempt to unload onto a customer a 
different finality may mean the loss of a 
greal amount of trade, for corrupt prae- 
4S 



tices are far more injurious than ineffi- 
cient business ability. In fact, it is 
wise never to place the complete stock 
of an-y line in the window under any cir- 
cumstances, particularly when the qual- 
ity is of a high class, as the customer 
is apt to believe that it is customary 
to carry particular lines for window 
display and a lower class for sale. It 
is not an unheard of thing, and the pub- 
lic knows it. 

How to Bore Holes in Plate Glass. 

It is often desirable to bore a 
hole through plate glass to be used 
as a shelf or for some other pur- 
pose in the store. This has ofiten seem- 
ed impossible to the trimmer or mer- 
chant in the smaller towns where there 
is no one especially prepared to do this 
work. Here is a simple and easy way 
to do it. 

Get a small three-cornered file and 
grind the points from one corner and 
the bias from the other and set the tile 
in a common brace for boring wood. 
Lay the glass you wish the holes bored 
in on a smooth surface covered with a 
blanket, and start the hole. You will 
soon make a slight impression on the 
glass. 

Around this place a disk of putty, lill 
this with water. This will prevent too 
great heating from the friction. Re- 
sume the boring and in a few seconds 
you will have as clean a hole as though 
you were boring in wood. Use a little 
care and don't apply too much pressure 
while you are boring, as you are liable 
to crack the glass. Any size hides may 
be made in this way. 

Send in Photos. 

Hardware and Metal will be pleased 
to receive and publish photographs of 
window displays that have attracted 
attention. These pictures will receive 
the personal attention of a window 
critic and both good and bad points in 
the display will be commented upon. In 
this way the window dresser will in all 
likelihood discover faults in his arrange- 
ment that lessened its value, and will 
learn the features that gave the displav 
its value. It is in a grasp of these 
points that the window dresser will be 
able in his future displays to avoid pre- 
vious faults, and employ the good fea- 
tures. Photos need not be mounted on 
expensive cardboard . 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



iETURNtrd 

JUL -4 lwf 

(JWV 
clfclA 



1 uV »^tO 




UNITED FACTORIES, LIMITED, 

OPERATING 
BOECKH'S TORONTO FACTORIES. 
BRYAN'S LONDON FACTORIES, 
DANE'S NEWMARKET FACTORIES. 




BOECKH 



y^ 



TORONTO, May ioth, 1904. 
Dear Sir : 

The question of side lines for the hardware trade has been the subject of numerous articles 
in "Hardware and Metal" of late. As that journal has no "axe to grind" their suggestions on 
this point are no doubt made purely with a desire to further the interest of the retail hardware 
man. 

If a hardware merchant wishes to carry anything besides ordinary staple hardware, our lines 
unquestionably offer the best opportunities as side lines, in fact, most of our goods can hardly be 
considered side lines to the hardware business from an up-to-date standpoint. 

Perhaps your store is exclusively a man's store, if so we would suggest a line of Horse 
Brushes, Stable Buckets, Stable Brooms, Baskets, etc. (We take it for granted that you handle 
Paint and Varnish Brushes, etc.) But why should the ladies be excluded from your store ? In 
two departments of the household, alone, we can offer a range of goods sufficient to bring them 
to you as steady customers. We refer to the kitchen and laundry. For the kitchen we have 
Pot and Sink Scrubs, Stove Brushes, Bake Boards, Butter Bowls, Chopping Trays, Mops 
Potato Mashers, Rolling Pins, Wooden Spoons, etc. For the laundry, Pails and Tubs, Wash- 
boards, Clothes Horses, Clothes Wringers, Clothes Lines, Clothes Pins, Baskets, etc , while for 
general house use we can supply a wide ranee of Brooms, Whisks, Feather Dusters, Cobweb 
Brushes, Bannister Brushes, Scrubbing Brushes, Step Ladders, Carpet Sweepers, etc. Don't 
you think we have suggested enough to make a pretty fair Ladies' Department ? 

With the opening of Spring, the season of house-cleaning, the above lines are of particular 
interest to housewives, and a window tastefully dressed with this line of goods would unques- 
tionably bring business to your store sufficient to more than compensate you for the trouble 
involved. 

We would emphasize the fact that these lines are not novelties, but staple lines which 
properly go with the hardware business, and there is a certain steady demand the year round. 

You will find that these lines offer a wider margin of profit than many staple lines of hard- 



ware. 



Trusting that you will at least favor us with a request for quotations, we are, 

Yours very truly, 

UNITED FACTORIES, Limited. 

P. S. Illustrated Catalogue will be furnished on application. 

49 



Hardware and Metal 



STOVES AND TINWARE 



June 4, 1904 




STOVES IN HARDWARE STORES. 



SOME Hardware merchants handle 
stoves and ranges. If all hard- 
waremen knew how easily this 
line could be taken up and profitably 
sold, certain it is that more hardware 
stores would carry a stock of these 
goods. If any class of hardware could 
he called staple, especially for smaller 
city and country trade, certainly it 
would be -'.<oves and ranges. Yet it is 
rather remarkable that upwards of one- 
half the hardware dealers of the east 
do not handle them, whites Hammernai! 
in Hardware. 

Stoves and heaters surely come under 
the genera] head of hardware; and the 
hardware store is the one where the 
buyer would naturally look for thesc- 
goods. Yet there are in many cities and 
even large towns exclusively stove 
stores. In some of our eastern cities 
it will be found that house-furnishing 
stores and even dry goods stores are 
working up a large business in goods 
that the ha;dwaremen ought to control, 
and one such line is stoves. Let the 
hardware merchant remember that ever • 
time a house-furnishing or dry goods 
store in any way enters his field, another 
wedge has ueen driven that will help to 
crack open the safe where the hardware- 
man keeps his profits. And by giving 
these competitors a chance, by himself 
not fully covering the Held. simply 
means thai he is letting competition 
grow . 

Some of the disadvantages to the 
stove business are quite apparent. Tha 
cost of distributing stoves is more ex- 
pensive than some lighter and higher- 
priced goods, such as cutlery, tools, etc. 
Properly handling stoves would probably 
require at 'east an extra man. When a 
sale is made, the job is not considered 
as finished until the stove is set up - 
and sometimes a defective chimney 
will even then cause the dealer much 
trouble — ai.d it is necessary for him to 
prove that the draft and not the stove 
is in the wrong. Then, too, it may be 
pointed out that the handling of stoves 
requires a large investment^ that often 
thev must be sold on instalments— thsl 



no small amount u£ trouble is brought t-j 
the dealer in making his collections, 
etc. All -Ana is true, hut, on the other 
hand, the large business? in stoves comes 
at a season when the regular hardware 
business is dull. The sales made on 
stove repairs and fixings, of a good es- 
tablished .love .rade, will pay tlu 
wages of an e-xtrs? man -and if carefully 
looked after will show a good profit in 
addition. 

Selling stoves and ranges will bring- 
to the hardwareman many new custom- 
ers. When people begin housekeeping, 
one of the first things to be bought is 
the range. And to the hardware store 
or house-furnishing store that sells that 
range will follow much other business 
from that .same customer— and often the 
sale of that first range will result in a 
lifelong customer being made. The pro- 
fit on stoves is good, while the profit 
from the sale of supplies is large. After 
the trade is once established the busi- 
ness is easily held. Ranges and stoves 
are always in demand; the goods are 
staple. 

As in adding any new line, it is a 
good idea to put some one clerk in 
charge of that end of the business and 
let him keep thoroughly posted on the 
line. Get the right man, and the hard- 
ware merchant will find the stove busi- 
ness a profitable adjunct to his regular 
trade. Care should be taken to get an 
agency for a well-advertised stove, and 
one that is high-grade. The best busi- 
ness can be built up on a line that will 
give entire satisfaction. More clean 
money can be made by selling the vei v 
best stoves, even if the price is some- 
what higher than that at which an in- 
ferior grade could be sold. 

As in every other business, one of tha 
best advertisements a store can have is 
a. pleased customer— this is especially 
I rue when a new line is being added — 
and even more true of a line such as 
stoves and ranges than of almost anj 
other goods. ?or this reason it is of 
utmost importance to sell stoves that 
will give he best of satisfaction. 
50 



Subscribe to the 

OIL AND COLUMN'S JOURNAL 

for news of the Oil, Paint, Soap, Varnish, 
Chemical and Drysaltery Trades. 

Subscription. *2.00 per year from date. 
Sample for 10 cents. 

SCOTT, GREENWOOD & CO. 

19 LUDOATE HILL LONDON, ENO. 




COVERT MFG. CO. 

West Troy,[N.Y. 

Steel Carriage and Wagon Jacks 

Harness Snaps, Chain, Rope and Web 
Goods, etc. 

SOLD BY ALL LEADING JOBBERS. 



PRIEST'S CLIPPERS 

JaA<J".»a ^--^3f Largest Variety, 

REA* 1 [ Z^^y/A Toilet, Hand, Electric Power] 

V ARE THE BEST. 

Highest Quality Grooming and 
Sbeep-Shearing Machines. 

WE MAKE THEM. 

8END FOB CATALOGUE TO 
American Shearer Mfg. Co., Nashua, N.H..CSA 

Wiebu9ch & Hilger, Limited, special New York 
representatives, 9-15 Murray Street. 






The FAIRGRIEVE GAS TOASTER 

Retails at 25c. The only Toaster guaranteed to toast on 
gas, gasoline or blue flame oil stoves without taste or smell. 
Write for prices. 

THE FAIRGRIEVE MAN'FG. CO.. 

29S COLLEGE ST., TORONTO. 
U. S. Branch : 289 Jefferson Ave.. DETROIT 

AgentB for Oreat Britain : Heine, Solly & Co., Sutton 
House, 2 Old Street, London, E.C. 



VORTEX 

HOT BLAST 
COAL 
STOVE 

for Soft Coal, 
Lignite, 
Hard Coal, 
Wood, 
and 
lighter 
fuel. 




For sale 
by 



E. T. Wriaht & Co., Hamilton, Canada. 



June 4, 1904 

Have you 
tried it ? 

Tried what ? 

SELLING 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




This is in your line of business, and it will 
pay you. 

The Batty Stove 4 Hardware Go 

76 YORK ST., TORONTO. 



DIAMOND EXTENSION STOVE BACK 



They are easily l'»t*nt*d, July nth, 1893. 
adjusted and 
fitted to a stove 
by anyone. 

Please your 
customers by 
supplying them 
immediately 
with what 
they want. 



C»na.il»n Patent, June 14th. 1894. 




EXTENDED. 



Sold by 
Jobbers 
of - - - 

Hardware 
Tinware 
and 
Stoves. 



Manufactured by THE ADAMS COMPANY. Dubuque, Iowa, U. S. A. 
TAYLOR-FORBES CO.. Limited, Guelph, Ontario. 



P-H 



This Coil 

is made of our celebrated % P-H Wrought 
Iron Pipe. It was taken at random from our 
stock and was bent cold. The inside diameter 
of the coil is but two inches. 

The Quality will be remem- 
bered long after the price 
is forgotten. 

PIPE THAT IS PIPF If your jobber does not carry this material, 

write us, and we shall see thatjyou get it. 

Write for Quotations. 



/'~\ 





Page-Hersey Iron & Tube Co., Limited, Guelph, Can. 

Davidson's Milk Can Trimmings 

and rlllk v^anS with broad hoop patent bottoms 



?Errj 

AUG 2ig| 




IN COMPLETE 

SETS. 
" Broad Hoor" Pattern 
— Composed of the following: 
i Broad Hoop Bottom, i 
Cover, i Centre Hoop 6 in. 
wide, 20 gauge, 1 Broad Top 
Hoop, 1 pair Cover Handles, 
1 pair Side Handles. 



give great satisfaction 
and are justly entitled to their 
popularity. 



Our BROAD-HOOP BOTTOM has all the 

advantages of a Seamless Bottom without the 
strain that spinning entails. 

BOTTOMS can be sweated in with very little 
solder. 

BOTTOMS are concave, draining to the 
centre, and are therefore easy to wash out and 
will not corrode. 

Top bands are shouldered and all bands have 
returned edges. 

PATENT FLUSH SIDE HANDLES. 



WE CAN SUPPLY BEST QUALITY TINNED IRON 
AT LOWEST MARKET PRICES. 




Heavy Rolled Edges make our PATENT Bottoms 
doubly durable and waggon and factory floor 
protectors. 



The THOS. DAVIDSON MFG. CO. Limited. . . .MONTREAL. 

51 



Hardware and Metal 



June 4, 1904 




SOME POINTERS FOR PLUMBERS. 



IN the following, from the pen of 
"The Judge, - ' m the Plumbers' 
Trade Journal, Canadian plumb- 
ers will find some thoughts 
worthy of attention : "I like to 
take a cheerful view of things; to share 
in the optimism of the younger men 
whose faith in men and morals is still 
in the ascendant ! If it were not for 
the enthusiasm of our young men, for 
the incense they burn before the altars 
of Faith and Hope, the world would be 
a sorry place indeed, and you and I, 
brother, who have been in life's race 
these many years, would not find zest in 
the battles they are fighting. Yes ! 
"\es ! It's very hard to take a cheerful 
view of the. plumbing business when so 
many irritating features present them- 
selves. But my word for it, oh, friend, 
you'll find it much pleasanter to still 
keep on the firing line and cease the 
useless complaining and criticising that 
is not accompanied by action. 

It's robbing you of your bank account, 
now, and by and by will rob you of 
physical and mental health, which is 
still worse. Yes, the labor problem is 
a delicate one; so is the loose credit 
system; so is the attitude of organized 
labor on the apprentice question; so is 
the laxity of plumbing laws; so is the 
laxity of latter day trade protection; so 
is the injustice of unfair and ignorant 
competition; so is the manufacture and 
sale of shoddy materials, and so are 
many other things that we encounter 
daily. Our boys are out on the firing 
line battling to right these things. 
Don't sit still; don't discourage them 

About the meanest cusses in the 
plumbing Hade just now are the makers 
and users of substitute materials, the 
stutT that is sold with a juicy discount 
and a guarantee of being "just as good." 
The manufacturer is, if possible, more 
deserving of censure than the buyer of 
his goods, but both in my opinion arc 
pirates and robbers— yes, ulcers defiling 
the fair forms of clean business and hon- 
est methods. When a man or a firm by 
the exercise of study, ingenuity and ex- 
periment devises an article, fixture, 
tool, valve or other implement of trade 
that is a successful departure from or a 
distinct improvement upon that in gen- 
eral use, justice and fair play should 



practically ensure a commercial reward 
commensurate with the value of their 
product. Do they get it ? My observa- 
tion of and reflections upon such matters 
for the last twenty years prompts the 
emphatic negative expression "no!" 

Who gets if The parasites who 
handle the cheap imitation of the in- 
ventor's original creation and the man 
with the scissors or the camera who 
produces the grandest and sometimes 
the richest, catalogs without a single 
original idea or design between its cov- 
ers. I don't know anything about pat- 
ent laws or the legal status of an or- 
iginal inventor; neither do I fully un- 
derstand the law of copyrights; but I do 
know that the vicious practices referred 
to are very common to the plumbing 
trade, and that it is high time some one 
called the trade's earnest attention to 
it, and suggested some means of pro- 
tecting the man who has enriched and 
advanced the trade with some valuable 
article, but also of protecting ourselves 
in everyday business competition against- 
the man who uses the cheap and dis- 
honestly made substitute. 

It is not possible, nor even practical 
under any possible means now attain- 
able, to have all materials or fixtures 
bear the stamp of approval from some 
central authority recognized by the 
plumbing trade, but it is eminently 
practical and would go a very long way 
in improving the conditions referred to, 
if the National Association of Master 
Plumbers would refuse to handle any 
article of trade use, from a porcelain 
bath tub to a gas pipe fitting, that did 
not bear the name of the manufacturer, 
either cast, painted or burnt upon the 
article itself. 

This, I admit, would only be a partial 
cure, but a complete one would possi'l 
be devised through the more general con- 
sideration of such matters that would 
follow the inauguration of such a rule. 
Of course, the pirate who uses a pin in 
his valve, where the other man used a 
screw; the fellow who substitutes a 
copper ball and a rubber seat for a 
rubber ball and a brass seat; the house 
that photographs Brown's "Speedway" 
closet, and after a change of the in- 
tegral jet from the right seat to the 
left, re-christens it "Smith's 'Driveway' 

52 



closet," and the rest of their numerous 
tribe would have to be dealt with in 
other ways.- On the whole, you'll find 
it good policy to preach and to practice 
the use of honest goods, to denounce the 
despicable practice of "substitution" 
and to so perfect your organization that 
the members who are honest, capable 
and conscientious will have a fair field 
and no favor as the very least they are 
entitled to in competition with men 
whose methods to-day are robbing in- 
ventors, robbing honest manufacturers, 
making competition a curse and perpe- 
trating wrongs upon the public that are 
positively criminal. 



Declare for an Open Shop. 

F EVIDENTLY the plumbers of Daven- 
j port, Iowa, have had some experi- 
ences similar to those of the 
Montreal employers, for they have, like 
their Montreal brethren, declared for 
an open shop in no uncertain tones. 
They have adopted the following resolu- 
tions : 

Whereas, We, the members of the 
Master Plumbers' Association of the 
City of Davenport, believing it to be to 
the best interests of harmony between 
employers as well as to the public in 
general : be it 

Resolved, That we declare for what is 
known as the "open shop." reserving 
the right to hire and discharge whom we 
please, but thai we will at all times give 
preference to union men, for the rea- 
son thai we believe the right of organi- 
zation lor mutual benefit should be ac- 
corded our employes equally with our- 
selves; be it further 

Resolved, That an Arbitral ion Com- 
mittee, consisting of three members se- 
lected from our association be appoint- 
ed to meet at any time with a like com- 
mittee of the journeymen plumbers or 
steam-fitters to settle by arbitration 
any questions in dispute that might 
arise ; be it further 

Resolved, That we pledge ourselves to 
take back all of the employes now lock- 
ed oui necessary to carry on the work 
now on hand, to report for work Tues- 
day, May 10, 1904, at 7.4.3 a.m.. and 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WINDOW 

GLASS 



A. 



Large stocks are now arriv- 
ing and assortments are well 
maintained. Glass is in 
splendid condition. Send us 
your specification now, and 
have your order filled before 
assortments are depleted. The 
brand is good and the price 
is right. 



& 



MONTREAL. 



' EST'D 

1842 



GLASS 
IMPORTERS 



T HE GURNE Y 

STANDARD SCALES 



Absolutely Accurate and Reliable. The Best of Material 
and Workmanship. Recognized throughout Canada aa 

"THE STANDARD" 




We make scales of every description. Established 1856. 
Send for catalogue and printed matter. 

The Gurney Scale Co., Hamil,on o*. 

Eastern Warehouse : Western Warehouse : 

The Gurney Massey Co., Limited The Gurney Stove and Rang* Co. 
Montreal, Quo. Winnipeg, Man. Limited. 




The Imperial Oxford Trade 
of Your District 

is the best range business there. 
Wouldn't you like to have it ? It 
means more business and better 
business for you. We are appointing 
agents for the 

Imperial Oxford Range 

in districts where we are not already 
represented. Won't you write us 
for particulars ? 



The Gurney foundry Co., Limited, 

TORONTO WINNIPEG VANOOUVER 

CORRESPONDENTS : 
THE GURNEY-MASSEY CO., LIMITED, 

MONTREAL, QUE 

THE GURNEY STANDARD METAL CO., LIMITED 
CALGARY, ALTA. 



53 



Eardv arc and Metal 



HEATING AND PLUMBING 



June 4, 1904 



the balance ;is soon thereafter as neces- 
sity demands; be it further 

Resolved, That the secretary be in- 
structed to forward a copy of the above 
resolution to the secretary of the Jour- 
neymen Plumbers' and Steam-Fitters' 
Association, with instructions that an 
acknowledgment or acceptance thereof 
will be unnecessary, as their reporting 
for duty will be sufficient evidence of 
their intentions to accept of and concur 
in this action. 

On May 10 the men, in conference 
with a committee from the association, 
refused to work under the resolutions, 
when the following rules were adopt- 
ed and Signed by both workmen and 
employers. 

I. The hours of actual work shall be 
from S a.m. to 12 noon, and from 1 p.m. 
to 5 p.m. 

'J. All employes shall be on their 
respective jobs and at work as per above 
hours. 

3. Time and a half will be allowed 
for all overtime, excepting Sundays, 
Decoration Day, Fourth of July, Labor 
Day. Christmas, New Year and Thanks- 
giving Day, for which double time will 
be allowed. 

4. On all work done outside of town 
the hours of work shall be governed by 
local customs at places where work is 
done. 

5. Apprentices will be employed at 
the discretion of employers. 

(i. Helpers will be supplied when 
deemed advisable. 

7. Car fare shall be allowed at dis- 
cretion of employers. 

8. All employes shall be respon- 
sible for any destruction of property or 
materia] caused by their carelessness or 
neglect. 

!). No discrimination shall be made 
between union and non-union men. 

10. Whenever a complaint of im- 
proper work shall be lodged against a 
journeyman he shall be compelled to re- 
pair the same at his own expense. He, 
however, shall be allowed to remedy any 
such work after working hours on the 
day of the complaint. 

II. All of the above rules are here- 
by accepted and agreed to. 



Montreal Strike Ended. 
In reply to an inquiry of Hardware 
and Metal regarding the strike situa- 
tion, Joseph Thibeault, the president of 
the National Plumbers' Association, 
said: "There is practically no strike 
now. as far as we are concerned, al- 



though there has been no agreement 
whatever between the master plumbers 
and the union. At the last meeting of 
the master plumbers not a single firm 
reported a shortage of men, but all say 
they have all the men they require, and 
are open to take any amount of work. 
The reason of this is because of the 
large number of plumbers arriving from 
the Old Country and filling the ranks 
of the strikers, so that we are in no 
way dependent upon them. It is a mat- 
ter of no concern to us now how long 
the strike under present conditions may 
last." 

To Holiday in Scotland. 

Robert Uoss. president of the Toronto 
Master Plumbers' Association, left on 
Thursday for a two months' holiday 
among the heather and the hills of his 
native land, "Auld Scotia." Mr. Koss, 
who is accompanied by his brother, 
Thomas Koss, is counting on having a 
gay time. He has had several busy- 
years since he last crossed the ocean, 
both in his business and in connection 
with the association. Now he will leave 
all cares behind him and enjoy the holi- 
day so weil earned. He was given a 
good send-off by the plumbing fratern- 
ity of Toronto. 

Galvanizing Small Articles. 

AN improved method of galvanizing 
small articles, such as nails, 
screws, tacks, rivets, washers, 
etc., is now being brought to the atten- 
tion of manufacturers. Representatives 
of the International Specialty Co., of 
San Francisco, Gal., are now in New 
York, at the Marl ton Hotel, 5 West 
Eighth street,' for the purpose of intro- 
ducing an apparatus invented and pat- 
ented by George Porter, an expert gal- 
vanizer. This apparatus, it is claimed, 
will be the means of placing on the 
market a number of galvanized goods 
which are not now carried in stock. 

In the old method of galvanizing, the 
articles arc placed in perforated dippers 
or baskets, dipped into a tank of molten 
zinc, left there till brought to the same 
temperature as the zinc, then taken out 
and shaken into an inclined chute lead- 
ing to a water tank, leaving a large 
quantity of surplus metal adhering to 
the articles. The contact with water 
makes them very rough, and often, in 
the case of small articles, a large per- 
centage of them will remain stuck to- 
gether in hunches. The articles when 
taken out of the water are sifted in 
sawdust to dry them and the bunches of 



stuck articles are picked out. By this 
method it is almost an impossibility to 
produce a satisfactory galvanized wood 
screw, for the reason that the slot and 
the thread are filled up with surplus 
metal. Washers are also difficult to 
galvanize, owing to the large amount of 
fiat surface on them and the liabilifv of 
their sticking together. The water cool- 
ing also has a bad effect on the metal 
of which the articles are manufactured. 

By the Porter method, as described by 
the inventor, the articles, after being 
dipped in the molten zinc, are thrown 
into the hopper of a machine which does 
the rest. It handles anything from a 
small tack to a 60-penny nail at the 
rate of from 2,000 to 3,000 pounds per 
hour, and a boy can run it. It removes 
all unnecessary surplus metal, cools 
without coming in contact with water 
and delivers the articles into kegs or 
boxes readv for shipment with one oper- 
ation. Its work is done so quickly 
that it allows the galvanizer to use his 
metal at a lower degree of temperature, 
and hence a less amount of dross is pro- 
duced and the life of the metal tank is 
prolonged. The cooling process is so 
gradual that the temper of the metal is 
not affected, leaving it in its original 
soft and malleable condition. The ad- 
vantages of such a process on such ar- 
ticles as clinch or boat nails and rivets 
can easily be seen. On screws the zinc 
is so evenly distributed that the thread 
and slot in the head are left perfect. 

This process, it is claimed, will 
cheapen wire nail galvanizing to such an 
extent that all wire nails can be gal- 
vanized. The galvanizing of nails will 
greatly increase their holding power, at 
the same time making them absolutely 
rust proof, so that they can be shipped 
to any part of the world or kept in 
stock for any length of time without 
fear of becoming rusty or damaged by 
dampness. 

This apparatus is not a matter of ex- 
periment, one of the machines having 
been in practical operation for some 
time in the Porter Metal Works, San 
Francisco. 



Made the First Box Stove. 

Ariel L. Thomas, who is credited with 
having manufactured the first box stove, 
died May 4 in Colrain, Mass., aged 87 
years. He was a native of Colrain. For 
many years he conducted a foundry at 
Foundry Village, in Colrain, as a mem- 
ber of the firm of Thomas & Gleason, 
and later by himself. His box stove 
was not patented, and was taken up by 
other manufacturers. 



54 



June 4, 1904 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



Hardware and Metal 



CHARLES BAVNES, England. 

KNUZDEN BROOK, 
MAKER OF THE BLACKBURN, 



II 



CLICK-CLACK 



ii 



HACK SAW BLADES. 

In Factory Solely NONE In All sizes 

BETTER. 



Devoted to Making 
Hack Saw Blades. 



of Best 
English Steal. 



The Hanover Portland Cement Co., Limited 

HANOVER, ONTARIO. 

Saugeen Brand" 



Manufacturers of *« 
the Celebrated 



OF PORTLAND CEMENT. 



Prices on application. 



"THE EMLYN" SAW BENCH 

Made in 6 sizes. Best value obtainable. Specially 
designed for export With or without " Emlyn ' 
Patent Guard. Sole maker — 

CHARLE8 D. PHILLIPS, 
Cables — Emlyn Engineering Works 

"Machinery," Newport. Newpokt, Mon., England 



Will Hold Dp a Shelf ! 

That's what a shelf, bracket is for. 
For this purpose there can be Nothing B et 
ter, Nothing Cheaper than the BRADLEY 
STEEL BRACKET. It is well Japanned, Strong 
and Light. The saving in freight is a good profit, 
aside from the lower price at which the goods are 
sold. Order direct or through your jobber. 

ATLA3 MFC. CO., 

New Haven, Conn., U.8.A. 




Manufacturers' 



Tp Hardware and 

1 Metal has in- 

quiries from time 
to time from 
m aim facturers 

Airents an ^ °thers want- 

ed ing representat- 

ives in the leading business centres here 
and abroad. 

Firms or individuals open for agencies 
in Canada or abroad may have their 
names and addresses placed on a special 
list kept for the information of inquirers 
in our various offices throughout Canada 
and in Great Britain without charge. 
Address 

Business Manager 

Hardware and Metal 
Montreal and Toronto 




It is a fact that one man with our PATENT 
PIPE DIE can easily do the work of two 
men wilh any other. Send us your address 
and we will explain HOW and WHY. 



A. B. JARDINE & CO. 

Hfrs. TAPS and DIES. 

HESPELER, ONT. 



PIG IRON 



FOR 
IMPORT. 



Carnbroe, Summerlee, Gartsherrie and Middlesboro', Glengarnock. 



Henry Rogers, Sons & Co., Montreal, P.Q. 

SATISFACTION 

results to everybody if you sell our 
METAL -all Metal -SCREENS. They 
cost no more than wood, are stronger 
and more workable. 

SEND FOR CIRCULAR. 




C. M. CUTTS& CO 

Maker*, Toronto Junction. 




55 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



June 4, 1904 




No. 4001 




Classified Designs in NeLal Ceilings 

assist in securing orders for the reason that they appeal to the good taste and judgment of a 
purchaser. 

There is no question about our having the most saleable line of Metal Ceilings on the 
Canadian Market, and where we have the opportunity of co-operating with a dealer, continual orders 
have always been the result. 

Do not say, "Oh, there is no Metal Ceiling work in my town," but put a little fresh bait on 
your hook and cast about. There is such a thing as making trade, and a sample Metal Ceiling 
erected, soon brings further orders. 

Make up your mind that you are going to do business, and you will find orders where you 
least expected. 

We will supply designs and blue prints and help you to start in right. 

There is no time like the present — ACT NOW. 




No. 4003 



Representatives The Metal Shingle ®> Siding Co., Limited 

G^jr^i-wTTH 7^*> Clare & BrocKest, "Winnipeg 

^^ _ No. 4002 A 1 «.,,. a r- ^ <~ l^ 

s~) (, •cHL *) Ellis 8i Grogan, Calgary 




Preston, Ont. 



No. 4006 



"EcwT 



Building Permits. 

MONTREAL. 

A. Lafrauce, Dufferiu street, two 
dwellings, $1,500. 

A. Perrault, 461 Plessis street, dwell- 
ing, $3,000. 

0. D 'Amour, two dwellings, $5,000, 
Dorion street. 

J. G. G. Kerry, four houses, Hutchi- 
son street, $7,200. 

A. Rochon, Chausse street, three 
dwellings, $2,800. 

Jacob Levi, Dufresne street, three 
dwellings, $28,000. 

0. Depate, three dwellings, 72 Visi- 
tation street, $4,000. 

Canadian Rubber Co., 1,000 Notre 
Dame street, building, $8,000. 

M. Tannenbaun, alteration on house, 
111 Metcalfe street, $2,200. 

V. Boissorineau, 1,502 St. Hubert 
street, two dwellings, $5,000. 

J. W. Stewart, 537 William street, 
three-storey building, $2,300. 

Sovereign Bank of Canada, building 
at 234 St. James street, $150,000. 

J. W. Orkin, building, Notre Dame, 
$23,000; also building to cost $17,000. 

Canadian Rubber Co., alteration on 
building, Notre Dame street and Pap- 
pineau avenue, $1,500. 

TORONTO. 

A. B. Dick, dwelling, Wood street, 
$3,400. 

W. Murray, two dwellings, Spadina 
road, $5,400. 

C. E. Walton, two dwellings, Smith 
street, $3,000. 

J. C. Malcomson, dwelling, Rusholme 
road, $4,700. 

John Inglis & Co., office, Strachan 
avenue, $5,000. 

McColl Bros. & Co., stable, Don Es- 
planade, $1,600. 

G. Wills, six dwellings, Ossington 
avenue, $7,200. 



V. L. Scott, two dwellings, Marguer- 
etta street, $3,000. 

R. Saunders, four dwellings, Dela- 
ware avenue, $7,500. 

R. E. Kennerer, two dwellings, 
Wright avenue, $3,000. 

R. West & Co., a residence, King and 
Wilson avenue, $5,000. 

F. W. Stair, addition to residence, 
St. George street, $1,500. 

Grand Trunk Railway, freight shed, 
corner of Simcoe and John streets. 
$10,000. 

C. R. S. Dinnick, a dwelling on Ber- 
nard avenue, $2,700; also three dwell- 
ings on Kendall avenue, $8,100. 



BRAJMDON, MAN. 

R. E. Bell, house, 13th street. 

D. H. Scott, residence, 8th street. 
John Scott, residence, 1st street. 
A. A. Evans, house, 13th street. 

E. Johnson, residence, 7th street. 
T. H. Milburn, house, 3rd street. 
Ed. Barnwell, residence, 1st street. 
Ed . Gregson, residence, 10th street . 
Geo. Miller, residence, 10th street. 
C. Splayford, residence, 3rd street. 
E. Shingfield, residence, 1st street. 
James Turnbull, residence, 6th street. 
Bernard White, residence, 10th street. 
Jason Burchal, residence, 5th street . 
P. W. Cook, residence on 4th street. 
C. Whillier, residence on Pacific ave- 
nue. 

J. N. Kirchoffer, residence, Russell 
street . 

Alex. McDonagh, residence, 1st 
street . 

Earl McCartney, residence, 13th 
street. 

Geo. C. Carbert, veneered residence 
on 2nd street. 

Wm. Currie and Alex. McEaehern, 
three houses on 1st and 2nd streets. 
56 



Light, Heat and Plumbing Notes. 

The directors of the Maritime Auer 
Light Co., Ltd., at a meeting in St. 
John, N.B., decided to go into volun- 
tary liquid ition. 

Building Notes. 

A new Methodist church is being built 
in Baldur, Man. 

The First Baptist Church, Winnipeg, 
is to be enlarged and improved. 

The Ab-.vdeen Hospital, New Glas- 
gow, N.S., is being extended. 

An addition is being made to the 
Glenboro Lehool, Glenboro, Man. 

The Antigonish C.M.B.A. Hall Co., 
Ltd., are erecting a building in An- 
tigonish, N.S. 

Tenders are being called for the con- 
struction ./f a new fire hall in Winni- 
peg. 

The shipping offices of the Interna- 
tional Coal Co., Sydney, N.S., are to 
be enlarged . 

Tenders are being called for the erec- 
tion of the Deer Park public school, To- 
ronto, by B. Sinclair, chairman. 

D. Bawlf is about to erect a five- 
storey building near the site of the Mas- 
sey-Harris showrooms, Winnipeg. 

J. R. Baker and 1. J. Phinney are 
calling for tenders for the erection of 
an Anglican church at Napinka, Man. 

The board of the Medical College in 
Winnipeg have secured a site adjoin- 
ing the present one for the proposed 
new college buildings. 

It is reported that the contract for 
the new hotel and station at Winnipeg 
has been let to Peter Lyall & Sons, 
Montreal . 

The Toionto Pharmaeal Co. will 
build a three-storey warehouse on King 
street west, near Spadina avenue, at a 
cost of $15,000. 

In addition to their new warehouse, 
Gordon, Mackay & Co. will erect a fac- 
tory on the north side of King street 
west, to cost $25,000. 






June 4, 1904 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



Hardware and Metal 




Hardware and Metal would be pleased to receive from any authoritative source industrial news of any sort, the 
formation or incorporation of companies, establishment or enlargement of mills, factories foundries or other 
works, railway or mining news, etc All such correspondence will be treated as confidential when desired. 



THE world's production of copper 
during the last three years is 
estimated by II. R. Merton & 
Co., London, Eng., in gross tons, as 
follows : 

1903. 1902. 19 1. 

Australia 29,000 28,640 30,875 

Canada 19,320 17,485 18,800 

Chili 30,930 28,930 30,780 

Germany v 21,205 21,674 21,720 

! a P an 31.30° 29,775 27,475 

Mexico 45.315 35.785 30,430 

Russia 10,320 8,675 8,000 

Spain and Portugal. .. . 49,740 49,790 53,641 

All other countries. .. . 29,980 27.400 29,677 

United States 298,760 292,870 265250 

Total 565.820 541,295 516,628 



The main building of the plant of the 
Stratford Chair Co., Stratford, Out., 
will be 60x100 feet, and three storeys 
high. A power house 30x38 feet, and a 
drying kiln, two storeys high with 
three drying apartments, will also be 
built. It is probable that the building 
material will be cement blocks. 



The annual meeting of the sharehold- 
ers of the Payne Consolidated Mining 
Co. was held in Montreal recently. The 
following directors were elected for the 
ensuing year : Lt.-Col. F. C. Henshaw, 
president; Hon. L. J. Forget, vice- 
president; A. W. McCuue, J. Dillon, W 
G. Ross, F. B. Mathys, R. Forget, Wm. 
Hanson, C. E. L. Porteous. 



The Quebec Government is being peti- 
tioned by J. R. Woodward, Sherbrooke, 
Quebec, to aid in the establishment of 
a smelter in the province, in order that 
the development of the copper bearing 
properties scattered throughout the 
province may be assisted. At the pres- 
ent time all the ores mined are sent to 
the smelter at Staten Island, N. Y., 
for treatment, which costs $4.65 per 
ton. If there were a smelter in the 
close vicinitv the cost of smelting would 
nut probably exceed 90c per ton. 



The re-organization of the Lake Su- 
perior Consolidated Co. is now com- 
plete. Speyer & Co. have closed the 
sale of the securities of the company, 
amounting to $5,050,000. The new 
company are now in possession of the 
property, and very shortly it is expect- 
ed that the plant at Sault Ste. Marie 



will be in full operation. At a special 
meeting of the Ontario Cabinet an order 
was passed declaring the provisions un- 
der which the bonds of the company, to 
the amount of $2,000,000, are to be 
guaranteed by the Government, had been 
complied with. 

Notes. 

R. E. Estey, lumberman, St. John, 
N. B., has assigned, the liabilities being 
$135,000, and the assets $105,000. 

The Pembroke Observer says that the 
National Mfg. Co., Pembroke, are now 
placing their cream separators upon the 

market. j; 

. . — .-' . 

The Anderson Furniture Co., New 
Castle, N. B., are seeking incorporation 
with a capital of $150,000, half of which 
is paid up. 

The Standard Paint and Varnish Co. 
are arranging to build and equip a 
new factory at Windsor, Ont., to cost 
$10,000. 

The Frontenac Cereal Co., Kingston, 
is planning to erect a $250,000 mill at 
Vancouver, to take care of the trade in 
western Canada. 

Within a very short time the machin- 
ery in the new 200-ton concentrator of 
the Rossland Power Co., Rossland, 
B. C, will be running. 

The Canadian Heating and Ventilating 
Co., Owen Sound, Ont., are opening up 
a warehouse in Winnipeg, from where 
the west will be supplied. 

The Fort William Journal says that a 
company known as the American Brick 
Co. have secured about 60 acres near 
the State River bridge, and are going 
to manulaiture brick. 

The Hamilton Herald says that the 
Diamond Glass Co. are talking of start- 
ing again a glass factory 111 Hamilton. 
It the factory is re-established 300 men 
will probably be employed. 

A meeting of the directors of the Do- 
minion Iron & Steel Co. was held at 
Montreal recently, for the purpose of 
preparing the statement for the annual 
meeting, the date for which has not as 
yet been set. 

The planing mill owned by Henry 
Lindep, on Moore street, St. Thomas, 
Ont., has been destroyed by fire. The 
total loss is $12,000, $10,000 on building 
and machinery, and $2,000 on stock. 
The mill will be rebuilt. 

57 



Dr. W. A. Parks, lecturer in miner- 
ology and geology, Toronto University, 
has been selected by the Dominion Geo- 
logical Survey to make an investigation 
of the recent mineral discoveries west 
and north of Lake Teniiskaming. 

The Canadian Westinghouse Co., 
Hamilton, who are having erected in 
that city a most up-to-date factory 
building, are now preparing plans tor 
ollice buildings which will cost in the 
neighborhood of $25,000. 

The new sawmill of Murray &, Greg- 
ory, St. John, N. B., has been com- 
pleted. The capacity of the mill per 
day is 75,000 feet of long lumber, 25,- 
000 shingles, 6,000 to 8,000 pieces clap- 
board, 40,000 pieces laths, and 25,000 
staves and headings. 

The Pure Gold Mfg. Co., Toronto, are 
seeking a permit from the City Board 
of Control to erect a factory warehouse 
just west of the College street fire hall. 
The company state their willingness to 
comply with all the conditions specified 
by the new building by-law. 

Companies Incorporated. 

J. Curry Co., Limited, Toronto; capi- 
tal, $50,000; purpose, to carry on a 
general brokerage business. 

The Niagara Falls Milling Co., Limit- 
ed, Niagara Falls; capital, $50,000, 
purpose, to deal in grain and cereals of 
all kinds. 

The Canada Smelting Co., Limited, 
Montreal; capital, $16,000, purpose, to 
carry on in general the business of 
smelting all kinds of metals. 

The Dominion Brokerage and Contract- 
ing Co., Limited, Ottawa; capital, $20,- 
000; purpose, to carry on business as 
brokers, contractors and general agents. 

Cameras, Limited,, Montreal; capital, 
$20,000; purpose, to manufacture and 
otherwise deal in cameras, lenses, 
lanterns, lantern slides, photographic 
plates, etc. 

Walker Steel Range Co., Limited, 
Windsor; capital, $75,000; purpose, to 
manufacture and sell steel ranges, 
sheeting, siding, and all kinds of metal 
work. 

The Cornell Brewing and Malting 
Co., Limited, Lindsay; capital, $40,000; 
purpose, to carry on the business of 
brewing of beer and manufacturing 
malt. 

The Reid Featherbone Mfg. Co., Lim- 
ited, London; capital, $20,000; purpose, 
to manufacture and sell featherbone, 
featherbone belts, girdles, neckwear and 
other featherbone novelties. 

W. B. Reid Co., Limited, Toronto; 
capital, $40,000; purpose, to carry on 



Hardware and Metal 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



June 4, 1904 



in all its branches the business of whole- 
sale and retail merchants of cigars, to- 
baccos, etc. 

Licenses Granted. 
S. II. Knox & Co., incorporated in 

\e\v York Stale, have been granted a 
license to carry on a general mercan- 
tile business m Ontario, provided that a 
capital not larger than $100,000 '.ere 
used. 



PEDLAR'S METAL LATH. 

H^RDWAREMEN in many centres 
have found it to their advantage 
to study the merits of the metal 
lath, as compared with the wooden one, 
and to persuade builders to use the 
former, thus opening a new line of trade 
lor themselves. The Pedlar People, 
Oshawa, Out., issue a booklet which 
may furnish retailers with valuable sug- 
gestions along this line. 

In the introduction to it they say: 
"111 to the present time the medal 
plastering lath has been used only in 
buildings where fire-proofing was the 
essential requirement, and while that is 
one of the principal advantages of 
Pedlar's "Perfect" lath, we, by 
the adoption of a new method 
of manufacturing, are able to offer 
what is conceded to be a super- 
ior article at a price that will enable 
it to be used in any building. Aside 
from its fire-proof qualities, the 
lath has the following- 
over wooden lath to 
it. The key is posi- 
actual size of the mesh is 
only 3-8 in. x 1-2 in., so that when the 
plaster is applied the metal lath be- 
comes practically embedded in the mor- 
tar, making it impossible for the mortar 
to crack and fall off. It can be applied 
more quickly than wooden lath, each 
sheet being 18 inches x 96 inches, which 
when applied covers 1 1-3 square yards, 
and to cover this space on 1G inch 
centres 3G staples only need be driven. 
A good mechanic, therefore, could 
eover a meat many more times the 
amount of space with the "Per- 
fect" lath than would be possible 
with a wooden lath. It takes no more 
mortar than wood lath. It has 
been demonstrated in actual prac- 
tice that 1 l-'J yards of sand and f> 
bushels of lime will cover Kill square 
yards of "Perfect" lath, this quantity 
being sufficient to cover the metal fabric 
thoroughly on both sides. Using the 
Pedlar "Perfect" metal lath no diffi- 
culty is experienced in the annoyance of 
having a good job spoiled by the sap 

from the lath staining through the 

plaster, as is the ease with wood. 



'•Perfect" 
advantages 
ce commend 
five. The 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 




Our Skylights 

are— 
DUST, 
WIND and 
WEATHERPROOF. 

People who buy the Oimsby Skylight 
are satisfied. 

WRITE ABOUT IT. 

A. B. ORMSBY LIMITED, 

Cor. Queen and George Streets, 
TORONTO, ONT. 



Orlan Clyde Cullen.C.E.L.L.M. 

Counsellor at Law U.S. Supreme Court. 
Registered Attorney U.S. Patent Office, 

U.S. and Foreign Patents, Caveats, Copy- 
rights and Trade Marks. Military and 
Naval Inventions a specialty. Address, 

Box 264, Station G, Washington, D.C. 

CUN SHOP and MODEL SHOP 

Warren White Sulphur Springs, 

Totten P.O., Virginia. 



$2 



FOR THIS SMALL SUM THE 



$2 



MANUFACTURER^oSUPPLY MERCHANT 

may keep posted on new openings 
for trade. 

III? CANADIAN CONTRACT RECORD 

reports weekly all projected building and other 
construction works throughout Canada as well 
as new business enterprises. 



Send your name and address with $2 for 
a year's subscription to 

Canadian Contract Record 

<J»2 TORONTO and MONTREAL §£ 



GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 




Our diamonds were first on the market and still remain first with up-to-date improvements. We claim 
for them Superiority over All Others in Quality and Workmanship. 

Glaziers' Diamonds of every description, for all purposes, supplied. Established 1815 

CANADIAN AGENT /* CT O C nn 

' GODFREY S. PELTON •*' 3IUIW « i30ll 

338 st. Paul St., - Montreal 52 Rahere St., E.C , London 



TRY A 
3 DOZ. CASE 

A BIC WINNER 



BbACK JiAGK 

^^E STOVE POLISH^ 



ASK YOUR 
JOBBER FOR IT 



SELLS ON SIGHT 



MONTREAL STEEL WORKS, 



SUCCESSORS TO- 

The Canada Switch and Spring Co., Limited. 

Manufacturers of 



LIMITED. 



IN 



OPEN) 
HEARTH 
SYSTEM. 



SPRINGS, FROGS, SWITCHES, SIGNALS, for Steam and Electric Railways 

CANAL BANK, POINT ST. CHARLES, : : MONTREAL- 

58 



June 4, 1904 

. . FULL STOCK . . 



BUILDERS' AND CONTRACTORS' SUPPLIES 



Hardware and Metal 



Salt Glazed Vitrified 



SEWER PIPE 



Double Strength Culvert Pipe 
a Specialty. 

'he CANADIAN SEWER PIPE CO. 

HAMILTON. OUT. TORONTO. ON?. 

ST. JOHNS. QUE. 

PORTLAND CEMENTS 

Best German, Belgian and English 
Brands. 

FIRE BRICKS 

FIRE CLAY 

FLUE LININGS 

DRAIN PIPES 

HARD WALL PLASTER 

CALCINED PLASTER 

WHEELBARROWS 

MORTAR STAINS. 

A Full Stock of Builders' and Con- 
tractors' Supplies. 

W. McNALLY & CO. 

40 to 52 Jlcaill St (Cor. Wellington St.) 
MONTREAL. 

Write for our quotations. 



Permanent, Economic*!. 
Hendaorae. 




Arrow Brand Asphalt Ready Roofing. 

Cornea in rolls, read/ to lay, with nails and cement. 
All ready covered with whit* sea gravel. No further attention after laid. 

A. C. JENKING, Sole Agent, 

Room 210 Coristlne Building, ■ MONTREAL. 

Sun, Frost, Water, Fumes DO NOT affect it. Write to-day for agency 




■ IOC iJ||/N n nr\/>C||J/A For Flat or Steep Roofs. It is Waterproof 

fa/^^Ei IVI I ^r#<% l\^^^^l I Hi Wi Fireproof, quickly and very easily laid, and 
mummmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmummmmmmmmmmmmmmi cheaper than other rooting. 



HAMILTON MICA ROOFING CO., 



60 Catherine Street North, 



HAMILTON, CANADA. 




CONSTRUCTION vs. DESTRUCTION. 

CARE vs. CARELESSNESS. 

BEST MATERIAL vs. POOR MATERIAL 

REX FLINTKOTE ROOFING vs. ALL OTHER ROOFING. 

IPireiitffcofe cRoojmg 

TRADE MARK f*J 

The above tells the whole story, and means to the dealer a quick-selling, business- 
bringing roofing vs. the ordinary kind that never sells, because people don't want it, 
and when they are persuaded to try it never come back again. If you want satisfied 
customers for roofing, you should write us to-day about Rex Fllntki 



J. A. & W. BIRD & CO., 40 | nd i a street, 



cote Roofing:. 
Boston, Mass. 



CHEESE PRESS SCREWS, 

JACK SCREWS, 

MORTISE MACHINES 



AND 



GENERAL CAST HARDWARE. 



THE H. R. IVES GO., MONTREAL. 



The Saw That Sells Itself. 

When placed in the hands of the intelligent mechanic the ATKINS High Grade Silver 
Steel Hand Saw sells itself. You simply show it and the saw does the rest. 



ATKINS Silver Steel Hand Saws with Perfection Handles are warranted 
the FINEST Saws on earth in material, temper, grinding and finish. 

Write for Catalogue and Prices. 

E. C. ATKINS & CO. 

C. D. TEN EYCK, Sales Agent for Canada. 

Toronto Office : 30 Front St, East. Tel. Main 1896. 



59 











>'**"*' 



"^ ATKINS 

ALWAYS AHEAD 



Leading Saw and Tool Manufacturers 

Factories: INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 
Northwestern Branch; Minneapolis, Minn. 



Hardware and Metal 



June 4, 1904 




A STATEMENT has been issued by the Russian 
Government on the financial situation with 
regard to the Japanese War. The statement 
reads: "The war. which broke out in spite of 
the peaceful intentions of Russia, found the 
finances of the empire in a satisfactory position. 

"The effective capital of the Exchequer, which at the 
beginning of the year amounted to 182,000,000 rubles, 
has been more than doubled up to the present time, by 
reason of the diminution of the budget expenses. Now 
the whole sum at the disposal of the Exchequer exceeds 
300.000,000 rubles. 

"Despite this, the war expenditure must be very con- 
siderable, and on this account it has been thought prudent 
to discover a new method for providing funds. These 
funds might be borrowed from the State Bank to the 
extent of 500,000,000 rubles, but in order to avoid ex- 
pending the effective capital at the risk of a disturbance 
of the monev in circulation, and as the Government wishes 
to see Russia at the end of the war in the same steady 
financial position as before the outbreak of hostilities, 
the Finance Minister has considered it necessary to have 
recourse to an external loan. 

"By imperial order of May 12 for an increase in the 
war funds the issue of a five per cent, external loan for 
a short term has been decided upon with a nominal cap- 
ital of 300,000,000 rubles, or 800,000,000 francs ($160,- 
000,000), under the title of 'five per cent. State Exchequer 
bonds of 1904,' free forever from Russian taxes. 

"On May 14, 1909, these bonds will be redeemable 
at the issue price, and must be presented for redemption 
in Paris. 

"The flotation of the loan is intrusted to the Neth- 
erlands Bank, the Credit Lyonais, and Hottinger & Co. 

of Paris." 

• 

A STATEMENT showing the percentage of increases 
in individual deposits in United States banking 
centres during the period from 1890 to 1903 has been 
compiled. The smallest percentage of increases are to 
Be found in New Orleans, Baltimore, Boston and 
Philadelphia, New York follows, and then Chicago, 
Pittsburg, St. Louis and San Francisco in the order 
named. The feature of the statement is that the At- 
lantic ports are far behind the interior centres. Specific 
causes no doubt would appear in an extended examination 
of local conditions, such as the growth of trust com- 
panies in Boston and the attraction which their generally 
higher rates of interest have for deposits that might 
otherwise be carried in national banks; this probably 
would explain a certain amount of the decreases scored 
in New Orleans, for there appears no intrinsic reason 
why individual deposits in general should have fallen 
away to the extent indicated. 

In New York's case the issue is open for discussion, 
and is a rather pretty one, whether the growth of such 
a banking item as individual deposits should be about 



commensurate with the average of the country or whether 
the advances scoi-ed by the x - emainder of the country 
ought, to have a cumulative effect at this point. To 
this end the item of individual deposits is an apt one, 
for its increase or decrease is not so readily brought 
about by external agencies of a temporary character as 
would be the case with other items in the bank state- 
ment. It is likely to indicate, therefore, as clearly as 
any, the permanent effect in one direction or the other, 
and so will serve reasonably well as a basis for dis- 
cussing the question whether a percentage of growth that 
keeps just a little ahead of that in the points of com- 
parison is to New York's detriment or credit. 

NOTES. 

Five German fire insurance companies were in- 
volved to the extent of $3,52,240 in the Toronto fire. 

Mr. Archibald Wood, private banker, of Millbrook, is 
dead. He was senior member of the firm of Wood and 
Kells. 

The annual meeting of the shareholders of the Sover- 
eign Bank of Canada will be held in Toronto on the 
14th inst. 

The Metropolitan Bank will occupy the quarters in 
the Canada Lifle Building, Toronto, which have been 
vacated by the Bank of Nova Scotia. 

The Bank of Nova Scotia are now occupying their 
handsome new building on King street west, Toronto. 
The rotunda and facade of this building have been greatly 
admired. 

The Nova Scotia Fire Insurance Company, a non-tariff 
company, which was organized in Halifax about a year 
ago, held its annual meeting recently. The report of the 
directors was considered very satisfactory. The num- 
er of policies issued during the year was 900, and the 
premiums received amounted to $21,113.97. The profits 
for the year amounted to $13,602.42. The rates of this 
company are something like 10 per cent, less than those 
of the tariff companies. 



M 



STOOK 




DESKS!!! 



THE LOWEST PRICES 

TEES & CO. 



300 8t. James St., 



MONTREAL 



60 



June 4 1904 



FINANCE AND INSURANCE 



Hardware and Metal 



w 



ESTERN 



• • 



Incorporated 
1851 

ASSURANCE 
• COMPANY. 



FIRE 

A1SD 

MARINE 



Heaaomce Capital 
Toronto, Assets, over 
Otlt. Annual Income 

HON. GEO. A. COX. President. 



$2,000,000.00 
3.546.000.00 
3.678.000.00 



J. J. KENNY, Vice-President and Man. Director. 

C. C. FOSTER, Secretary. 



i&" Money ^* 

CAN BE SAVED BY MEANS 
OF AN ENDOWMENT POLICY. 

YOU CAN ONLY SECURE 
SUCH A POLICY WHILE YOU 
ARE IN GOOD HEALTH. 



Pamphlets and Full Particulars regarding the 

New Accumulation Endowment Policy 

sent on application. 



Confederation Life 



ASSOCIATION. 



W. H. BEATTY, PRESIDENT. 
W.C. MACDONALD, J. K. MACDONALO, 

ACTUARY. MANAGING DIRECTOR. 



HEAD OFFICE, 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



MANUFACTURERS AND 
MERCHANTS. 

It may be necessary for your staff to have fidelity 
bonds. We act as surety on such. We are known the 
world over. 

Write to us for terms and particulars. 



The London Guarantee & Accident Co,, Limited, 

D. W. ALEXANDER, General Manager for Canada, 

Canada Life Building, • ■ . TORONTO. 



BRITISH AMERICA 
ASSURANCE COMFY 



FIRE AND MARINE. 



Incorporated 1833 



CASH CAPITAL, 81,000,000.00. 

TOTAL ASSETS, $2,024,096.02. 

LOSSES PAID SINCE ORGANIZATION, $23,886,005.32. 

HEAD OFFICE, - BRITISH AMERICA BUILDINO, 
Cor. Front and Scott Sts., Toronto. 

HON.GEO. A. COX, President. J. J. KENNY, Vice-President 

P. H. 8IM8, Secretary. and Managing Director 



THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE. 



Paid-up Capital, 
Rest, 

HON. GEO. A. COX, President. 



B. E 



$8,700,000 
$3,000,000 

WALKER, General Manager. 



HEAD OFFICE : TORONTO, CANADA. 

This Bank, with 109 branches, covering all the principal cities of Canada and 
the Pacific coast of the United States, and its own offices in London, Eng , and 
New York, is able to offer to those engaged in mercantile business of any kind 
unexcelled facilities for any legitimate banking business. 

LIST OF BRANCHES : 
BRITISH COLUriBIA : 



Atlin Greenwood Nanaimo 

Cranbrook Kam loops Nelson 

Fernie Ladysmith New Westminster 

MANITOBA AND NORTHWEST TERRITORIES 



Vancouver 

" East End 
Victoria 



Calgary 

Carman 

Dauphin 

Dawson 

Edmonton 



Ayr 

Barrie 

Belleville 

Berlin 

Blenheim 

Brantford 

Cayuga 

Chatham 

Collingwood 

Dresden 



Amherst 
Antigonish 
Barrington 
Bridgewater 



Elgin Moose Jaw 

Elkhorn Moosomin 

Gilbert Plains Neepawa 

Grandview Ponoka 

Innisfail Portage la Prairi* 

Medicine Hat Red Deer 

ONTARIO AND QUEBEC : 



Ottawa 

Paris 

Parkhill 

Peterboro' 

Port Perry 

St Catharines 

Sarnia 

Sault Ste Marie 

Seaforth 

Simcoe 



Dundas 

Dunnville 

Fort Frances 

Gait 

Goderich 

Guelph 

Hamilton 

London 

Montreal 

Orangeville 

MARITIME PROVINCES : 
Canning New Glasgow 

Halifax Parrsboro 

Lockeport Sackville 

Lunenburg St John 

Middleton Shelburne 

IN THB UNITED STATES 
Portland, Ore 
Seattle, Wash. 



Regina 
Swan River 
Treherne 
White Hors» 

Winnipeg 

North 



Stratford 

Strathroy 

Toronto, 8 offices 

Toronto Junction 

Walkerton 

Walkerville 

Waterloo 

Wiarton 

Windsor 

Woodstock 



Springhill 
Sydney 
Truro 
Windsor 



San Francisco. 



Skagway, Alaska 

LONDON, ENGLAND, OFFICE : 60 LOMBARD ST., E.C. 

A general banking business transacted. Foreign exchange bought and sold 



THE METROPOLITAN BANK, 



CAPITAL PAID UP, 
RESERVE FUND, 



$1,000,000. 
I.OOO.OOO. 



HEAD OFFICE, - TORONTO. 

R. H. WARDEN, L.D., President. W. D. ROSS, General Manaoer. 



BRANCHES 



Brigdeu 
Brockville 

Brussels 
East Toronto 
Milton 



Petrolia 
Picton 
Streetsville 
Sutton West 
Wellington 



GENERAL. 

BANKING 

BUSINESS 



In Toronto— 
cor. College and Bathurst Sta, 
Dundas and Arthur Sts. 
Queen and McOaul Sts. 

7 and 9 King St. E. 

SAVINGS 

DEPARTMENT 
AT ALL BRANCHES 



61 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



Roofing Felt Factory 



Htrbor St 



Montreal. 



Paper Manufacturers 



Paper Mills, 



Joliette, 
Quebec. 



Building Papers BW>cVl 0,amond Br *n<i Brown- Manilla Wrapping 

Ready Roofing ^^ Hanging and Print, 

Pitch and Roofing Cement r ***ED felt. Colored Papers 

ALEX. McARTHUR & CO., Office 82 McGill St., Montreal 



LIMITED. 



CURRENT MARKET QUOTATIONS. 



June 3, 1904. 

These prices are for such qualities and 
quantities as are usually ordered by retail 
dealers on the usual terms of credit, the 
lowest figures being for larger quantities and 
prompt pay. Large cash buyers can fre- 
quently make purchases at bettor prices. Ihe 

Editor is anxious to be informed at once of 
any apparent errors in this list, as the desire 
is to make it perfectly accurate. 

METALS. 

TIN. 

Lamb and Flag and Straits— 

56 and 28-lb. ingots, 100 lb. $30 00 $31 00 
TIN PLATES. 
Charcoal Plates— Bright. 
itf.L.S., equal to Bradley— Per box. 

I C, usual sizes 96 50 

IX " 800 

IXX " , 950 

Famous, equal to Bradley — 

ic «£> 

IX 825 

IXX 97o 

Raven and Vulture Grades— 

I C, usual sizes * 25 

IX " 500 

IXX " 5 75 

IXXX " 6 50 

"Dominion Crown Best "—Double 

Coated, Tissued. p er j, ox 

IC 5 50 ' 

IX "50 

XX 7 50 

AUaway'B Best "—Standard Quality. 

IC 450 

IX 550 

IXX 6 50 

Coke Plates— Bright. 
Bessemer Steel— 

I.C., usual size, 14x20 3 35 

I.C., special sizes, base 3 60 

' 20x28 7 10 

Charcoal Plates— Terne 
Dean or J. G. Grade— 

IC, 20x28, 112 sheets .... 7 50 

IX., Terne Tin 10 50 

Charcoal Tin Boiler Plates. 
Cookley Grade— 

X X, 14x56, 50 sheet bxs. ) 

" 14x60, " [ ... 7 00 
" 14x65, " ) 
Tinned Sheets. 

72x30 up to 24 gauge 7 25 7 50 

r ' 26 " 7 75 8 00 

IRON AND STEEL. 

Common bar, per 100 lb 180 

Refined " " 2 20 

Horseshoe Iron " 2 25 

Hoop steel, 1 J to 3-in. base 2 75 

Sleigh shoe steel, " 2 10 

Tire steel 2 30 2 50 

T. Firth&Co.'s tool steel, per lb 125 13 

B. K. Morton & Co. 

" Alpha " Air Hardening tool steel.. 70 

" M " Self-Hardening 50 

" I " Standard 14 

JesBop's high speed steel 60 

standard tool steel 14 

" crucible sheet steel 14 

Chas. Leonard stool. . 08 09 
Crucible Steel Co. 

Black Diamond 10 11 

Silver steel 13 

Special 17 

" Rex high speed steel. . 65 75 

Self Hardening 45 50 

Sanderson's Crucible Tool OS 09 

Superior " 12 13 

Extra Anld 15 

Self Hardening. ... 45 50 

" Rex high speed 65 75 

Jonas fc Colver's tool steel. ... 10 20 

" " Air Hardening" 70 

Drill steel, per lb 08 10 



BABBIT METAL. 

"Tandem." A per lb. 27 

B " 21 

C " Hi 

Frictiouless Metal ' 23 

Syracuse Smelting Works : 

Aluminum, genuine 45 

Government, " 44 

Tough, " 40 

Hard, " 040 

Dynamo 30 

Special 25 

Harmony 22 

Car Box 20 

Extra 15 

The Canada Metal Co. : 

Imperial, genuine, 40 

Metallic 30 

Hercules 20 



Star.. 

No. 

No. 

No. 

No. 



Geo. Langwell & Son. 



No. 
No. 
No. 



15 
12 
10 
06 
05 



08 
07 
05J 



Extra 09; 

BLACK SHEETS. 

Montreal. Toronto 

10 and 16 gauge 2 25 2 50 

18 gauge 2 30 2 50 

20 " 2 30 2 50 

22to24gauge 2 35 2 70 

26 " 2 40 2 80 

28 2 40 2 90 

COPPER WIRE. 
Discount, 50 per cent. 

CANADA PLATES. 

Ordinary 2 60 

All bright 3 50 

Galvanized Canada Plates- 
Ordinary. Dom. 
Crown. 

18x24x52 4 25 4 35 

" 60 4 50 4 60 

20x28x80 8 50 8 70 

" 94 9 00 9 20 

GALVANIZED SHEETS. Queen's 
Fleur-de-Lis. Gordon Crown. Comet Bell. Head 

16 gauge 3 65 

18 to 24 gauge . . 3 75 3 75 3 75 3 75 
26 " .. 4 00 4 00 3 90 4 00 

28 " .. 4 25 4 25 4 05 4 25 

American brands, $4.00 for 28 gauge. 
Less than case lots 10 to 15c. extra. 

CHAIN. 
Proof coil, 3-16 in., per 100 lb. 7 00 
i 

5-16 
1 
7-16 



10 00 
5 60 
4 45 
3 85 
3 70 
3 55 

i-16 " 3 45 

3 35 
3 25 

Halter, kennel and post chains, 40 to 40 and 
5 per cent. 

Cow ties 40 p.c. 

Tie out chains 65 p.c. 

Stall fixtures 35 p.c. 

Trace chain 45 p.c. 

Jack chain, iron, single and double, discount 

35 p.c. 
Jack chain, brass, single and double, dis- 
count 40 p.c. 

COPPER. 

Ingot. Per 100 lb. 

Casting, car lots 13 75 

Bars. 
Cut lengths, round, J to i in. . 21 00 23 00 
" round and square, 

1 to 2 inches... 21 00 23 00 



Sheet. 

Plain, 16 oz., 14x48 and 14x60 .... 20 00 

Plain, 14 oz 21 00 

Tinned copper sheet 24 00 

Planished 32 00 

Braziers' (in sheets). 

4x6 ft., 25 to 30 lb. each, per lb 22 

" 35 to 45 " " .... 21 

" 50-lb. and above " .... 20 

BOILER AND T.K. PITTS. 

Plain tinned, per lb 28 

Spun, per lb 32 

BRASS. 
Rod and Sheet, 14 to 30 gauge, 15 per cent. 

Sheets, hard-rolled, 2x4 23 

Tubing, base, per lb 231 

ZINC SPELTER. 

Foreign, per 100 lb 6 00 6 25 

Domestic " " 

ZINC SHEET. 

5-cwt. casks 6 15 6 50 

Partcasks 6 50 7 00 

LEAD. 

Imported Pig, per 100 lb 3 20 3 30 

Bar.perlb 05 

Sheets, 21 lb. sq. ft., by roll 06} 

Sheets, 3 to 6 lb. " 06 

Note.— Cut sheets Jc. per lb., extra. Pipe, 
by the roll, usual weights per yard, lists at 7c. 
per lb. and 35 p.c lis. fob. Toronto. 

Note. — Cut lengths, net price, waste pipe 
8-ft. lengths, lists at 8c. 

ANTIMONY. 

Cookson's per lb. 7 50 8 00 

SHOT. 

Common, $6.50 per 100 lb.: chilled, $7.00 
per 100 lb.; buck, seal and ball, $7.50. Dis- 
count, 174 pc. Prices are f.o.b. Toronto, 
Hamilton, Montreal, St. John and Halifax. 
Terms, 3 p.c. cash, freights equalized. 

PLUMBING GOODS. 

BATH TUBS. 

Zinc 6 00 

Copper, discount 20 per cent, off revised list. 

BATHS. 

Standard Enameled. 

5|-ft. rolled rim, 1st quality 21 60 

5J " " "2nd " 17 85 

closets. Net. 

Fittings 1 00 

Plain Simplex Syphon Jet 9 00 

Emb. " " " ..9 50 

Fittings 1 25 

Low Down Elgin or Teutonic, plain. . 6 00 

Low " " " emb. .. 6 50 

Connection 1 25 

Plain Richelieu 4 25 

Emb. " 4 50 

Connections 1 25 

Basins, P.O., 14-in 63 

Basins, oval, 17 x 14-in 1 50 

Basins, " 19 x 15-in 2 Oi, 

iron pipe. 
Black pipe— Per 100 feet. 

1 inch 3 05 

1 " 2 07 

| " 2 25 

J " 2 50 

i " 3 22 

1 " 4 58 

1} " 6 47 

U " 7 85 

2 " 1105 

2J " 19 25 

3 " 22 75 

3J " 28 75 

4 ' 35 25 

41 " 41 00 

5 " 44 00 

" 57 50 

62 



Galvanized pipe — 

J inch 2 88 

I " 3 11 

1 " 3 42 

! " 4 40 

1 " 6 35 

1} " 8 80 

11 " 10 75 

2 " 14 80 

Malleable Fittings— Discount 20 p.c. 

Cast Iron Fittings- 
Standard, 571 per cent.; unions,55 per cent.' 
on nipples, headers and flanged unions, 60 
per cent. 

PLUMBERS' BRASS GOODS. 

Standard Compression work, dis. 60 & 10 p.c. 
Cushion work, discount 50 per cent. 
Fuller work, discount 70 per cent. 

6 dozen lots and over of the above, extra dis- 
count 10 per cent. 

Lever handle Stops and Waste, discount 60 
per cent. With, in lots of 2 dozen and over 
an extra discount of 10 per cent. 

J. M.T. Globe, Angle and Check Valves, dis- 
count 55 per cent. 

Standard Globe, Angle and Check Valves, 
discount 60 per cent. 

Kerr's special standard globes and angles, 
discount 60 percent. 

Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc and 
heavy standard valves, discount 60 percent. 

Kerr's standard brass checks, discount 60 p.c. 

Kerr's standard brass disc steam radiator 
valves, discount 70 per cent. 

Kerr's Jenkin disc, copper-alloy disc radia- 
tor valves, discount 70 per cent. 

Kerr's quick - opening hot - water radiator 
valves, discount 70 and 10 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 
valves, brass, discount 55 per cent. 

Weber's (Kerr) patent straightway gate 
valves, I.B.B.M., discount 70 per cent. 

J. M. T. Radiator Valves discount 55 per cent. 

Standard Radiator Valves, discount 60 per 
cent. 

Patent Quick - Opening Valves, discount 65 
per cent. 

No. 1 compression bath co.-k net 1 75 

No. 4 " " " 1 90 

No .7 Fuller's " 2 10 

No. 41, " " 2 25 

Patent Compression Cushion, basin 
cock, hot and cold per doz. 15 00 

Patent Compression Cushion, bath 
cock, No. 2208 2 25 

Square head brass cocks, discount 55 percent. 
" " iron " "50 to 60 " 

Thompson Smoke-test Machine $25.00 

RANGE BOILERS. 

Dominion, 30 gallon net 4 75 

35 " * " 5 75 

40 " " 6 75 

Copper, 30 gallon " 22 00 

K 35 ' " 24 00 

" 40 " 28 00 

Discount off copper boilers 15 per cent. 

SOID PIPE AND FITTINGS. 

Light soil pipe, discount, 50 per cent. 

" " fittings, discount 50 and 10 p.c. 
Med. and Extra heavy pipe and fittings, dis. 60 
per cent. 

7 and 8-in. pipe, discount 40 and 5 per cent. 

solder. Per lb 

Bar, half-and-half, guaranteed 19 

Bar, half-and-half, commercial 18 

Refined 18 

WRENCHES. 

Acme, dit lount 35 to 371 per cent. 
Agricultural, discount 60 per cent. 

Coe's Genuine, discount 20 to 25 pe cent. 

Towers' Engineer.. each 2 00 7 00 

S per doz. 5 80 €00 

G. &K.'sPipe " .... J 40 

Burrell's Pipe each — 3 00 

Pocket per doz. 25 2 9C) 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



BEAMS 
CHANNELS 
ANGLES 
PLATES 3 



1,500 TONS FOR SALE 

All of this material in lengths from 40 to 60 feet. 

We can ship promptly, and should be pleased to receive your order. 

Prices and stock lists on application. 

STEEL FRAME BUILDINGS and ROOF TRUSSES. 

Also Steel Bridges for Railways and Highways. 

HAMILTON BRIDGE WORKS COMPANY 



LIMITED 



Long Distance Telephone, Hamilton 630. 



MAIN/IH-TOIM, CANADA. 



PAINTS AND OILS. 

COLORS IN OIL. 
1-lb. tins, pure. 

Venetian red, per lb 08 

Chrome yellow 15 

(Jolden ochre 08 

French " 06 

Marine black 04 

Chrome green 10 

French permanent green 13 

Signwriters' black 15 

COLORS DRY. 
Pure in bbls., per cwt. Less than this 
quantity 4c. extra. 

Common ochre, bbls 2 50 

Yellow ochre 1 124 

Brussels ochre 2 75 

Venetian red, 1 50 2 25 

English oxides 3 00 3 25 

American oxides 1 25 2 75 

Canadian red oxides 1 50 

Super magnetic oxides, 93 p.c 2 00 

Burnt sienna 9 00 

" umber 6 00 7 00 

Raw umber 6 00 7 00 

Drop black 12 00 

Chrome yellow 18 

Chrome greens 5 50 

French green 09 

Golden ochre 2 75 

Ultramarine blue, in 28-lb.bxs 7 00 10 00 

Fii e proof mineral 1 00 

Genuine Eng. Litharge 4 50 

Mortar color 1 00 

Pure Indian red. lb 09 

Whiting, bbl 65 

English vermilion in 30-lb. bgs. ... 85 
WHITE LEAD. Per 100 lb. 



Pure 

No. 1 

No. 2 

No. 3 

No. 4 

Munro's Select Flake White . . 
Elephant and Decorators'Pure 

Monarch 

Deoorator's Pure 

Essex Genuine 

Sterling Pure 

Island City Pure 



4 75 
4 50 
4 25 
3 874 

3 50 

4 75 

4 75 

5 00 
4 75 

4 25 

5 00 
5 00 

Ramsay's Pure Lead 4 75 5 00 

Ramsay s Exterior 4 50 4 75 

RED LEAD. 

Genuine, 560 lb. casks, perewt $4 25 $4 50 

Genuine, 100 lb. kegs, " .... 4 75 

No. 1, 560 lb. casks, per cwt 4 00 

No. 1, 100 lb. kegs, per cwt 4 25 



WHITE ZINC. 

Extra Red Seal 06 

French V. M 06 

Lehigh 0,06 

DRY WHITE LEAD. 

Pure, casks 

Pure, kegs 

No. 1, casks 

No. 1, kegs 



PREPARED PAINTS. 

In }, J and 1-gallon tins. 

Pure, per gallon 

Second qualities, per gallon 

Barn (in bbls.) 60 

The Sherwin-Williams paints 1 30 

Canada Paint Co.'s pure 

Toronto Lead & Color Co*s pure 

Sanderson Pearcy's pure 

Standard Co.'s " New Era.". . 

"Globe" barn 60 

Francis- Frost Co.'s "Ark" B'd 

11 British Navy deck 

Henderson & Potts's "Anchor" 

Ramsay's paints. Pure, per gal 

Thistle, " 

Outside, bbls 

Island City House Paint 

Floor " .... 

Sterling House Paint 

Floor " 

National 



08 
061 
06} 



4 50 
4 75 
4 25 
4 50 



1 20 
1 00 

90 

1 40 
1 25 
1 25 
1 20 
1 30 

70 
1 25 
1 50 
1 35 
I 20 
1 00 

65 

1 25 
1 25 
1 20 
1 10 
1 05 



PUTTY. 

Bulk in bbls 1.45 

Bulk in less quantity 1*70 

Bladders in bbls 1 70 

Bladders in kegs, boxes or loose 1 85 

25-lb. tins 1 80 

12J lb. tins 2 05 

Bladders in bulk or tins less than 100 lb. 1 85 

VARNISHES. 

In 5-gal. lots. Per gal. Net. 

Carriage, No. 1 1 50 1 60 

Pale durable body 4 10 4 25 

" rubbing 2 85 3 20 

Gold size, japan 1 50 1 60 

No. 1 brown japan 85 90 

Elastic oak 1 50 

Furniture, extra 110 125 

No. 1 90 100 

Hardoilflnish 135 150 

Light oil finish 160 170 

Damar 175 2 00 

Shellac, white 2 40 2 50 

" orange 230 240 

Turpentine, brown japan 1 10 1 20 

black japan 1 10 1 20 

"' No. 1. 85 90 

Eiastilite varnish, 1 gal. can, each. . 2 00 

Granitine floor finish, per gal 2 75 

Maple Leaf coach enamels; size 1, $1.20; 

size 2, 70c.; size 3, 40c. each. 
Sherwin-Williams' kopal varnish, assorted 
case, from to 1 gal., $2.50. 

GLUE. 

Common 08 084 

French medal 10 14 

White, extra 18 22 

Gelatine 

Strip 18 20 

Coopers 19 20 

Huttner 

Ground 12 16 

Cologne, genuine 



HARDWARE. 



AMMUNITION. 



Cartridges. 

B. B. Caps Dominion, 50 and5 and 25 per cent. 

Rim Fire Pistol, discount 40 p.c, American. 

Rim Fire Cartridges, Dominion. 50 and 5 p.c. 

Central Fire, Military and Sporting, Amer- 
ican, add 5 per cent, to list. B.B. Caps, 
discount 40 per cent., American. 

Central Fire Pistol and Rifle, 10 p.c, Amer. 

Central Fire Cartridges, pistol sizes, Domin- 
ion, 30 per cent. 

Central Fire Cartridges, Sporting and Mili- 
tary, Dominion, 15 per cent. 

Loaded and empty Shells, "Trap" and 
" Dominion " grades,25 per cent, discount. 
Rival and Nitro, 10 per cent, advance on 
list. 

Brass Shot Shells, 55 per cent. 

Primers, Dom., 30 per cent.; American, $1.75 

Wads. per lb. 

Best thick brown or grey felt wads, in 

4-lb. bags $0 70 

Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 12 and smaller gauges 99 
Best thick white card wads, in boxes 

of 500 each, 10 gauge 35 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 each, 

12 and smaller gauges 20 

Thin card wads, in boxes of 1,000 

each, 10 gauge P 25 

Chemically prepared black edge grey 
cloth wads, in boxes of 250 each— Per M. 

11 and smaller gauge 60 

9 and 10 gauges 70 

7 and 8 " 90 

5 and 6 " 1 10 

Superior chemically prepared pink 
edge, best white cloth wads, in 
boxes of 250 each — 

11 and smaller gauge 1 15 

9 and 10 gauges 1 40 

7 and 8 " 1 65 

5 and 6 " 1 90 



ADZES. 
Discount 20 per cent. 

ANVILS. 

Wright's, 80-lb. and over lOf 

Hay Budden, 80-lh. and over 09} 

Brook's, 80-lb. and over 11} 

AUGERS. 

Gilmour's, discount 65 and 5 per cent, off list. 

AXES. 

Chopping Axes 

Single bit, per doz 7 00 10 00 

Double bit, " 10 00 18 00 

Bench Axes, 40 per cent. 
Broad Axes, 25 per cent. 

Hunters' Axes 5 50 6 00 

Boys' Axes 6 25 7 00 

Splitting Axes 7 00 12 00 

Handled Axes 10 00 

AMERICAN AXE AND TOOL CO. 

Red Ridge, boys', handled 5 75 

hunters 5 25 

Underhill American Bench Axes, 40 p.c. 

AXLE GREASE 

Ordinary, per gross 6 00 7 00 

Best quality 10 00 12 00 

BELLS. 

Hand. 
Brass, 60 per cent. 
Nickel, 55 per cent. 

Cow. 
American make, discount 63J per cent. 
Canadian, discount 45 and 50 per cent. 

Door. 

Gongs, Sargant's 5 50 8 00 

" Peterboro', discount 50 and 10 
per cent, off new list. 

Farm. 
American, each 1 25 3 00 

House. 
American, per lb 35 40 

BELLOWS. 

Hand, per doz 3 35 4 75 

Moulders', per doz 7 50 10 00 

Blacksmiths', discount 40 per cent 

BELTING. 

Extra, 60 per cent. 

Standard, 60 and 10 per cent. 

No. 1, not wider than 6 in., 60, 10 and 10 per 

cent. 
Agricultural, not wider than 4 in., 75 per cent. 

BITS. 

Auger. 
Gilmour's, discourt 60 per cent. 
Rockford, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 
Jennings' Gen., net list. 

Car. 
Gilmour s, 47J per cent. 

Expansive. 
Clark's, 40 per cent. 

Gimlet. 

Clark's, per doz 65 90 

Diamond, Shell, per doz 1 00 1 50 

Nail and Spike, per gross 2 25 5 20 

BLIND AND BED STAPLES. 

All sizes, per lb 07J 12 

bolts and nuts Per cent. 
Carriage Bolts, common ($1 list) 

" 3-16 and} 60 

" 5-16 and § 55 and 5 

" 7-16 and up 55 

" full sq. ($2.40 lis* ) 60 
" " Norway Iron ($3 

list) 60 

Machine Bolts, all sizes, i and 

less 60 

Machine Bolts, 7-16 and up 55 and 5 

Plough Bolts 55 and 5 

Blank Bolts 55 and 5 

Bolt Ends 55 and 5 

Sleigh Shoe Bolts 70 

Coach Screws, cone point 70 

Nuts, square, ail sizes, 4c per lb. off. 
Nuts, hexagon, all sizes, 4}c. per lb. off 
Stove Rods per lb., 5 J to 6c 
boot calks. 

Small and medium, ball per M. 4 25 

Small heel " 4 50 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS. 

Discount 624 per cent. 

63 



BUTCHERS' CLEAVERS. 

German per doz. 6 00 9 00 

American " 12 00 18 00 

BUTCHER KNIVES. 

Bailey's per doz. 60 6 30 

BUILDING PAPER, ETC 

Tarred Felt, ner 100 lb 1 85 

Ready roofing; 2-ply, not under 45 lb. 

per roll 90 

Ready roofing, 3-ply, not under 65 lb., 

per roll 1 15 

Carpet Felt per ton 45 0C 

Heavy Straw Sheathing per ton 35 00 

Dry Sheathing per roll, 400 sq. ft. 40 

Tar " " 400 " 50 

Dry Fibre " 400 " 55 

Tarred Fibre " 400 " 65 

O. K. &I. X. L... '• 400 " 70 

Resin-sized ' 400 '' 45 

Oiled Sheathing " 600 •• 1 00 

Oiled " .... " 400 " 70 

Roof Coating, in barrels per gal. 17 

Roof " small packages " 25 

Refined Tar per barrel 5 00 

Coal Tar " 4 00 

Coal Tar, less than barrels per gal. 15 

Roofing Pitch per 100 lb. 1 10 

BULL RINGS. 

Copper, $2.00 for 24-inch, and $1.9 or 2-inen 

BUTTS. 

Wrought Brass, net revised list. 

Cast Iron. 
LooBe Pin, discount 60 per cent 
Wrought Steel. 
Fast Joint, discount 65, 10 and 24 per cent. 

Loose Pin, discount 65, 10 and 2J per cent. 
Berlin Bronzed, discount 70, 70 and5 percent 

Gen. Bronzed per pair 40 65 

CARPET STRETCHERS. 

American per doz. 100 150 

Billiards " 6 50 

CASTORS. 

Bed, new list, discount 55 to 574 per cent. 
Plate, discount 524 to 574 per cent. 

CATTLE LEADERS. 

Nos. 32 and 33 per gross 7 50 8 50 

CHALK. 

Carpenters' Colored, per gross 45 75 

White lump perewt. 60 65 

£ ed 005 06 

Crayon per gross 14 18 



Socket, Framing and Firmer. 
Broad s, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 
Warnoek's, discount 50 and 10 per cent 
P. S. & W. Extra, discount 60 and 10 per cent. 

FOODS— STOCK. 

Colonial Stock Foods, 50c. packages, 

per doz |4 CO 

' " 25c. pkgs., " 2 r>0 

■ " 10c. " " 75 

_ ' _ , 25-lb. pail, each 1 30 

Poultry Foods, 25c. packages 125 

Cough Powders, per doz 1 2i 

Worm " " 1 25 

Internation 1 Stock Foods, $1 packages 

perdoz g 00 

International Stock Foods, per pail . . 2 75 
per I. hi .... 10 50 
Poultry " $1 pkgs.. ptrdz. 8 00 
Worm Powders, 50c.pkg8, " 4 00 
Pine Healing oil, per doz ... 8 00 
Pheno-Chloro,$lpkgs.,per doz 8 00 

Hoof Oint ment 8 00 

" Compound Absorbent 16 00 

Also 25c pkgs. at #2 per doz. 50c pkgs. at 
4 per doz. 

CLIPS 

Axle, discount 65 per cent. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



Two Paper Mills and Three Factories Busy 



making Paterson's Wire -Edged Ready Roofing, Building Papers 
and Roofing Felts. 

Our success is due to the fact that we make the goods the people want, 
and our customers know their orders will be promptly and carefully filled. 



*7 



The Paterson Mfg. Co-, Limited 



Toronto and Montreal. 



COMPASSES, DIVIDERS, ETC. 
American, discount 624 to 65 per cent. 
CONDUCTOR PIPE. 
Plain or Corrugated. 

j-inch per 100 feet 3 00 

3 " " " 4 00 

4 •• " " 5 25 

5 " • " 6 75 

6 " " " 9 00 

CRADLES, GRAIN. 

Canadian, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

CROSSCUT SAW HANDLES. 

8. k D., No. 3 per pair 8 17} 

8. 4D., " 5 r ' 22} 

8. tD„ " 6 " 15 

Boynton pattern " 20 

DOOR SPRINGS. 

Torrey s Rod per doz 1 75 

Coil, 9 to 11 in " 95 1 65 

English.... " 2 00 4 00 

DRAW KNIVES. 

Ooaob and Wagon, discount 50 pei oent. 

Carpenters' discount 60 and 10 per oent. 
DRILLS. 
Hand and Breast. 
Millar s Falls, per doz., net list 

DRILL BITS. 

Horse, discount 37$ to 40 per cent. 
Standard, discount 50 and 5 to 55 per cent. 

FAUCETS. 

Common, cork-lined, discount 35 per cent. 

EAVETROUGHS. 

10-inch per 100 ft. 10 00 

elbows (stovepipe.) 

5 and 6-inch, common per do/.. 1 20 

7-inch " 1 35 

Polished, 15c. per dozen extra. 

ESCUTCHEONS. 

Discount 50 and 10 per cent., new list 

ESCUTCHEON PINS. 

Iron, discount 40 per cent. 

FACTORY MILK CANS. 

Discount off revised list, 40 per cent. 

FILES AND RASPS. 

Great Western 70 and 10 per cent. 

Arcade 70 " 10 

Kearney 4 Foot 70 " 10 

Disstons 70 " 10 

American 70 " 10 " 

J. Barton Smith 70 " 10 

MoClellan 70 " 10 

Eagle 70 " 1U 

Nicholson, 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 

Royal 80 

Globe 70 to 75 

Black Diamond. 60 and 10 to 60, 10 and 5 per 

cent. 
Jowitt's, English list, 25 to 27$ per cent. 
Nicholson File Co. s "Simplicity" rile handle, 

per gross 85c. to $1.50 



GLASS. 

Window. Box Price 



Star 



D. Diamond 



Size United Per Per Per Per 

Inohes. 50 ft. 100 ft. 50 ft. 100 ft. 

'Inder 26 3 80 .... 5 06 

26 to 40 4 00 .... 5 44 

41 to 50 4 50 .... C 56 

51 to 60 4 75 .... 7 50 

61 to 70 5 00 .... 8 62 

71 to 80 5 30 .... 9 38 

81 to 85 10 75 

86 to 90 12 30 

91to»5 15 00 

%to 100 18 00 

Discount 15 per cent. 



071 



22 



3 00 
1 00 



OS j 
25 



4 00 
1 50 



GAUGES. 

Marking, Mortise, Etc. 
Stanley s discount 50 to 55 per cent. 

Wire Gauges. 
Winn's, Nos. 26 to 33 . . . .each 1 65 2 40 

GILLETTS POWDERED LYE. 

lease, $3.60 ; 3-case, $3.50 ; 5-case and over, 
$3.40. 

HALTERS. 

Rope, {-inch per gross 12 00 

Rope, J " " .... 9 00 

Rope, | to J-inch " 14 00 

Leather, 1-inch per doz 4 00 

Leather, 1J " " .... 5 20 

Web " .... 2 45 

HATCHETS. 

Shingle, Red Ridge 1, per doz 4 40 

2, " 4 85 

Barrel, Underhill 5 00 

HAMMERS. 

Nail. 
Maydole's, discount 5 to 10 per cent. Canadian 
discount 25 to 27$ per cent 
Tack. 

Magnetic per doz. 1 10 120 

Sledge. 

Canadian per lb. 

Ball Pean. 
English and Canadian, per lb. 

HANDLES. 
Axe, 2nd growth, per doz. net 

tore door . . .per doz. 

Fork. 
C. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 

Hoe. 
O. & B., discount 40 per cent., revised list. 
Saw. 

American per do» I 00 1 25 

Plane 

American per gross 3 15 3 75 

Hammer and Hatchet. 
Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

hangers. doz. pairs. 

Steel barn door 8 00 . 10 00 

Stearns, 4-inch 4 50 

5-inch 6 00 

Zenith 9 00 

Lare's covered — 

No. 11, 5-foot run 8 40 

No. Hi, 10-foot run 10 80 

No. 12, 10-foot run 12 60 

No. 14, 15-foot run 2100 

Steel, covered 4 00 1100 

" track, 1 x 3-16 indOO ft) .... 3 75 
" Hx3-16in(100ft) .... 4 75 

HARVEST TOOLS. 

Discount 60 per cent. 

HATCHETS. 

Canadian, discount 40 to 42$ per cent. 

HAT ENAMEL. 

Henderson & Potts' ' Anchor Brand " 

HINGES 

Blind, Parker's, discount 60 percent, ■ 

Heavy T and strap, 4-in., per lb 06} 

5-in., " 06} 

6-in., ' 06 

8-in., " 05J 

10-in., " 05$ 

Light T and strap, discount 65 and 5 per oent. 
Screw hook and hinge — 

6 to 10 in per 100 lb 4 50 

12 in up " .... 3 25 

Spring, No. 20, per gro. pairs 10 50 

HOES. 

Garden, Mortar, etc., discount 60 per cent. 
Planter per doz. 4 00 4 50 

HOLLOW WARE. 

Tinned cast, 35 per cent. 

HOOKS. 

Cast Iron. 
Bird oage per doz. 50 110 



Clothes line, No. 61.. " 00 70 

Harness " 60 12 00 

Hat and coat per gro. 1 10 10 00 

Chandelier per doz. 50 100 

Wrought Iron. 
Wrought hooks and staples Canadian dis- 
count 60 per cent. 

Wire. 
Hat and coat, discount 60 per cent. 

Belt per 1,000 .... 60 

Screw, bright, discount 60 per cent. 

HORSE NAILS. 

"C" brand, 40, 10 and 7} per cent, off list ( Oval 
"M" brand, 55, per cent. t head 

Countersunk, 57$ per cent. 
"Monarch," 50 and 7$ per cent. 
"Peerless " 50 per cent. dis. 

HORSESHOES. 

F.O.B. Montreal 
No. 2 No. 1 
Iron Shoes. and and 

larger, smaller. 

I ight, medium and heavy 3 65 3 90 

Snow shoes 3 90 4 15 

Steel Shoes. 

XL, sizes 1 to 5 5 35 

Light, No. 2 and larger 3 80 

No. 1 and smaller .... 4 05 

Featherweight, all sizes to 4 5 35 

Toeweight, all sizes 1 to 4 ., 6 60 

JAPANNED WARE. 

Discount 50 per cent. 

ICE PICKS. 
Star per doz. 00 3 25 

KETTLES. 

Brass spun 7$ per cent, discount off new list. 

Copper per lb. 30 50 

American, 60 and 10 to 65 and 5 per cent. 

KEYS. 

Lock, Canadian dis. 40 to 40 and 10 per cent. 
Cabinet, trunk and padlock, 
American per gross .... 60 

KNOBS. 

Door, japanned and N.P., per 

doz 1 50 2 50 

Bronze, Berlin per doz. 2 75 3 25 

Bronze, Genuine ... . " 600 900 

Shutter, porcelain, F. & L. 

screw per gross 1 30 2 00 

White door knobs. . . .per doz 2 00 

HAY KNIVES. 
Net prices. 

LAMP WICKS. 
Discount, 60 per cent. 

LANTERNS. 

Cold Blast per doz. 7 00 

No. 3, "Wright's" " 8 50 

Ordinary, with O burner. ... " 4 00 

Dashboard, cold blast " 9 00 

No. • 5 75 

Japanning, 50c. per doz. extra. 

LEMON SQUEEZERS. 

Porcelain lined per doz. 2 20 5 60 

Ualvanized " 187 3 85 

King, wood " 2 75 2 90 

King, glass " 4 00 4 50 

All glass " 50 90 

LINE'.,. 

Fish . per gross 1 05 2 50 

Chalk " 1 90 7 40 

LAWN MOWERS. 

Woodyatt, 10$-in. wheel, 14-in. cut . 8 50 
Star, 9 -in. " " . . -7 00 

Daisy, 8 -in. " " (net) 2 87$ 

Philadelphia,?} in. " " ..700 

Ontario, 7^ in. " " . . 15 80 

KingEdw'd, 12-in. " " .9 50 

Discount, 50 per cent., with freight conces- 
sions in quantity shipments. 

Maxwell & Sons : 

lO'/.-in. high wheel 7 50 10 00 

9-in 5 50 6 25 

8-in 4 90 5 50 

Discount 50 per ceut. 

LOCKS. 
Canadian, 50 to 50 and 10 per oent. 
Russell & Erwin . . per doz. 



Cabinet. 
Eagle, discount 30 per cent. 

Padlocks. 

English and Am per doz. 50 6 00 

Eagle, discount 20 to 25 per cent. 

MACHINE SCREWS. 

Iron and Brass. 
Flat head, discount 25 per cent. 
Round head, discount 20 per cent. 

MALLETS. 

Tinsmiths' perdoz. 1 25 1 50 

Carpenters', hickory, " 1 25 3 75 

Lignum Vitae " 3 85 5 00 

Caulking, each 060 200 

MATTOCKS. 

Canadian per doz. 5 50 6 00 

MEAT CUTTERS. 

American, discoun 34 per cent. 

German, 15 per ceu 

Gem each 115 

MILK CAN TRIMMlNOd. 

Discount 25 per cent. 

nails. Cut. Wire. 

2d and 3d 3 30 3 45 

3d 2 95 3 12 

4and5d 2 70 2 95 

6 and 7d 2 60 2 80 

8 and 9d 2 45 2 60 

10 and 12d 2 40 2 55 

16and20d 2 35 2 50 

30, 40, 50 and 60d (base) 2 30 2 45 

Cut nails in carlots 5c. less. 

Wire nails in carlots are $2.40. 

Steel cut nails 10c. extra. 

Miscellaneous wire nails, discount 15 per cent. 

Coopers' nails, discount 30 per cent. 

NAIL PULLERS. 

German and American 1 75 2 50 

NAIL sets. 
Square, round and octagon, 

per gross 3 38 

Diamond 1 00 

POULTRY NETTING. 

2-in. Mesh, 19w.g., dis. 60 percent. 
2-in. Mesh, 16 w.g. and heavier, 50 p.c. 

OAKUM. 

U. S. Navy per 100 lb 6 75 

Plumbers " 3 00 

OILERS. 
McClary s Model galvanized 

oil can, with pump, 5 gallon, 

per dozen 10 00 

Davidson oilers, discount 40 per cent. 
Zinc and tin, discount 50, 50 and 10 per cent 

Copper per doz. 1 25 3 50 

Brass " 1 50 3 50 

Malleable, discount 25 per cent 

GALVANIZED PAILS. 

Dufferin pattern pails, discount 45 per c<"'' 
Flaring pattern, discount 45 per cent. 
Galvanized washtubs, discount 45 per cent 

PIECED WARE. 

Discount 40 per cent off list, June, 1899. 
10-qt. flaring sap buckets, discount 40 per cent 
6, 10 and 14-qt. flaring pails dis. 40 per cen'.. 
Creamer cans, discount 40 per cent. 

Per dozen 6 00 9 00 

PICTURE NAILS. 

Porcelain head per gross 1 35 1 50 

Brass head " 40 100 

PICTURE WIRE. 

Tin and gilt, discount 75 per cent. 

PINE TAR. 

} pint in tins per gross ... 7 80 

1 •• •• " .... 9 60 

PLANES. 

Wood bench, Canadian discount 40 per cent., 

American discount 50 per cent. 
Wood, fancy Canadian or American, 37} U. 

40 per cent 



64 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



/ Pe/n/M3fof r Raises Records 

The new CEO. Trap Gun established the five-man squad world's 
records — 1454-1500 clay targets, 97 per cent., in three consecutive days. 

Do you care for record-breaking scores ? The new Remington 
C.E O. gun, retailing at $75.00, is a revelation to those who have been 
used to old-style guns. 

ILLUSTRATED CATALOGUE FREE 

REIV1IISJOTOISI ARMS CO., IL.ION, IM.Y. 
Agency: 315 Broadway, New York City. Depot: 86-88 First St., San Francisco, Cal. 



PLANE IRONS. 

English perdoz. 2 00 5 00 

PLIERS AND NIPPERS. 

Button's genuine, per doz. pairs, discount 
374 to 40 per cent. 

Button's imitation perdoz. 5 00 9 00 

German " 60 60 

PRESSED SPIKES. 

Discount 20 per cent. 

PULLEYS. 

Hothouse perdoz. 55 100 

Axle " 22 33 

Screw " 027 1 00 

Awning " 35 2 50 

PUMPS. 

Canadian cistern 180 360 

Canadian pitcher spout 1 40 2 10 

PUNCHES. 

Saddler's perdoz. 1 00 1 85 

Conductors " 3 00 15 00 

Tinners', solid perset 72 

" hollow per inch 100 

RAKES. 

Wood per doz. net 1 20 up 

per doz. 



RAZORS. 

Elliot's 4 00 

Geo. Butler's & Co. s 4 00 

Boker's 7 50 

King Cutter ........ 12 50 

Wade & Butcher's 3 60 

Theile k Quack's 7 00 

Carbo Magnetic 

Griffon Barber's Favorite 

Griffon No. 65 

Griffon Safety Razors 

Griffon Stropping Machines. 
Lewis Bros ' Klean Kutter 



50 



18 00 
18 00 

11 00 
15 00 
10 00 

12 00 
15 00 
10 75 

13 00 
13 50 
13 50 
10 50 



REGISTERS. 

Discount 40 per cent. 

RIVETS AND BURRS. 

Iron Rivets, black and tinned, discount 60 and 

10 per cent. 
Iron Burrs, discount 55 per cent. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in 1-lb. cartons, $c 

per lb. 
Extras on Iron Rivets in $-lb cartons, lc. 

per lb. 
Copper Rivets, with usual proportion burrs, 45 

per cent, discount. Cartons, lc. per lb. 

extra, net. 
Copper Burrs only, discount 30 and 10 per cent. 
Extras on Tinned or Coppered Rivets, J-lb. 

cartons, lc. per lb. 

RIVET SETS. 

Canadian, discount 35 to 37$ per cent. 

ROPE, ETC. 

tSisal 10J 

Pure Manilla 13} 

"British" Manilla 12 

Cotton, 3-16 inch and larger 20; 22 

" 5-32 inch 25 27 

J inch 25 28 

Russia Deep Sea 15 

Jute 08 

Lath Yarn, single 1U$ 

double 11 

Sisal bed cord, 48 feet per doz. 65 

" 60 feet " 80 

" 72 feet " 95 

RULES. 

Boxwood, discount 55 per cent. 
Ivory, discount 37$ to 40 per cent. 

SAD IRONS. 

Mrs. Potts, No. 55, polished. ...per set 80 

No. 50, nickle-plated, " 90 

Common, plain — 4 50 

plated ft 50 

SAND AND EMERY PAPER. 

B. 4l A. sand, discount, 40 and 5 per cent 
jflmery, discount 40 per cent. 
Oaniel (Run on a) 5 to 10 per cent, advance 
enlist 



SAP SPOUTS. 

Bronzed iron with hooks per 1,000 7 50 

"Eureka" tinned steel, hooks " 8 00 

SAWS. 

Hand, Disston's, discount 12$ per cent 

S. & D., discount 40 per cent. 

Crosscut, Disston's — per foot 35 55 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent, on Nos. 2 and 3. 

Hack, complete each 75 2 75 

" frame only each 50 125 

SASH WEIGHTS. 

Sectional per 1001b. 2 00 2 25 

Solid " 1 50 1 75 

SASH CORD. 

Per lb 28 30 

saw sets. per doz. 

Lincoln and Whiting 4 75 

Hand Sets. Perfect 4 00 

X-Cut Sets, " 7 50 

SCALES. 

Gurney Standard, 40 per cent. 

Guroiey Champion, 50 per cent. 

Burrow, Stewart & Milne- 
Imperial Standard, discount 40percenc. 
Weigh Beams, discount 35 per cent. 
Champion Scales, discount 50 per cent. 

Fairbanks standard, discount 35 per cent. 

Dominion, discount 55 per cent 

" Richelieu, discount 55 per cent. 

Warren's new Standard, discount 40 percent. 
1 Champion, discount 50 per cent. 
" Weighbeams, discount 35 per cent. 

SCREW DRIVERS. 

Sargent's . . .per doz. 65 1 00 

SCREEN DOORS. 

Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, walnut 

stained, 4-in. style perdoz. 6 50 

Common doors,2 or 3 panel, yellow and 

green stained, 4-in. style.. . .per doz. C 75 
Common doors, 2 or 3 panel, in natural 

colors, oil finish per doz. 8 75 

3-in. style 20c. per dozen less. 

SCREWS. 
Wood, F. H, Bright and steel, discount 87$ 

per cent. 
Wood, R. H., bright, dis. 82$ pei cent. 
" F. H., brass, dis. 80 percent. 
" R. H, " dis. 75 per cent. 
' F. H, bronze, dis. 75 per cent. 
' R. H, " dis. 70 per cent. 
Drive Screws, dis. 87$ per cent. 

Bench, wood perdoz. 3 25 4 00 

" iron " 4 25 5 00 

Set, case hardened, dis. 60 per cent. 
Square Cap, dis. 50 and 5 per cent. 
Hexagon Cap, dis. 45 per cent. 

SCYTHES. 

Perdoz.net 6 00 9 00 

SCYTHE SNATHS. 

Canadian, discount 40 per cent. 

SHEARS. 

Bailey Cutlery Co., full nickeled, discou 

and 2$ per cent. 
Bailey Cutlery, Japan Handles, discount 67$ 

per cent. 
Seymour's, discount 50 and 10 per cent. 

SHOVELS AND SPADES. 

Canadian, discount 45 per cent. 

SINKS. 

Cast iron, 16 x 24 85 

18 x 30 1 00 

18x36 140 

SNAPS. 

Harness, German, discount 25 per cent. 
Lock, Andrews' 4 50 11 50 

SOLDERING IRONS. 

1, l$-lb per lb 37 

2-lb. or over " .... 34 

SQUARES. 

Iron, No. 493 per doz. 2 40 2 55 

" No. 494 " 3 25 3 40 

Steel, discount 60 to 60 and 5 per cent. 
Try and Bevel, discount 50 to 52$ per cent. 

STAMPED WARE. 

Plain, discount 75 and 12$ per cent, off re- 
vised list. 
Returned, discount 75 per cent off revised list. 



STAPLES. 

Galvanized 3 00 

Plain 2 80 

Coopers', discount 45 per cent. 

Poultry netting staples, discount 40 per cent. 

STOCKS AND DIEN. 

American discount 25 par cent. 

STONE 

Washita per lb. 28 60 

Hindostan " 06 07 

slip " i/9 09 

Labrador " ... 13 

Axe " .... 15 

Turkey " 50 

Arkansas " 1 50 

Water-of-Ayr " 10 

dcythe per gross 3 50 5 00 

Grind,2-in.,40to2001b.,perton .... 25 00 

" under 40 lb., " .... 28 00 

" under 2 in. thick, " 29 00 

STOVEPIPES. 

5 and 6 inch, per 100 lengths .... 7 00 
7 inch " " 7 50 

ENAMELINE STOVE POLI8H. 

No. 4, 3 doz. in case, net cash 4 80 

No. 6, 3 doz. in 1 ase. . " 8 40 

TACKS, BRADS, ETC. 

Carpet tacks, blued 80 and 10 

tinned 80 and 20 

" " (in kegs) 40 

Cut tacks, blued, in dozens only 80 

i weights 60 

Swedes cut tacks, blued and tinned — 

In bulk 80 and 10 

In dozens 75 

Swedes, upholsterers', bulk 85, 12$ and 12$ 

" brush, blued and tinned 

bulk 70 

Swedes, gimp, blued, tinned and 

japanned 75 and 12$ 

Zinc tacks 35 

Leather carpet tacus 55 

Copper tacks 50 

Copper nails 52$ 

Trunk nails, black 65 and 5 

Trunk nails, tinned 65 and 10 

Clout nails, blued 65 and 5 

Chair nails 35 

Patent brads 40 , 

Fine finishing 40 

Lining tacks, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

" " solid heads, in bulk 75 

Saddle nails, in papers 10 

" " in bulk 15 

Tufting buttons, 22 line, in doz- 
ens only 60 

Zinc glaziers' points 5 

Double pointed tacks, papers. . 90 and 10 

bulk.... 40 

Clinch and duck rivets 45 

TAPE LINES. 

English, ass skin perdoz. 2 75 5 00 

English, Patent Leather 5 50 9 75 

Chesterman's each 90 2 85 

" steel each 80 8 00 

TINNERS' SNIPS. 

Perdoz 3 00 15 00 

THERMOMETERS. 

Tin case and dairy, discount 75 to 75 and 10 
per cent. 

traps (steel.) 
Game, Newhouse, discount 25 per cent. 
Game, H. & N., P. S. & W., 65 per cent. 
Game, steel, 72$, 75 per cent. 

TROWELS. 

Disston's, discount 10 per cent. 

German perdoz. 4 75 6 00 

S. & D., discount 35 per cent. 

TWINES. 

Bag, Russian per lb 27 

Wrapping, cotton. 3-ply 24 

'* " 4-ply 27 

Mattress per lb. 33 45 

Staging " 27 35 

VISES. 

Wright's 13} 

Brook's 12j 

Pipe Vise, Hinge, No. 1 3 50 

r ' " " No. 2 5 50 

Saw Vise 4 50 9 00 

Columbia Hardware Co. 
Blacksmiths' (discount) 60 per cent. 

" parallel (discount) 45 per cent. 



ENAMELLED WARE. 

White, Princess, Turquoise, Blue and White 

discount 50 per cent 

Diamond, Famous, Premier, discount' 50 and 

10 per cent 

Granite or Pearl, Imperial, Crescent', discount 

50, 10 and 10 per cent. ■ 
Premier steel ware, 40 per cent. 
"Star " decorated steel and decorated white 

25 per cent. 

WIRE. 

Smooth Steel Wir«. 

No. 0-9 gauge $2 5U 

J? 6c. extra. 

" 12c. " 

|2 20c. " 

J3 30c. " 

" 40c. " 

\\ 55c. " 

16 70c. 

Add 60c. for coppering and $2 for tinning. 
Extra net per 100 lb. — 6iled wire 10c. 
spring wire 31.25, special hay baling wire30c., 
best steel wire 75c., bright toft drawn 15c., 
charcoal (extra quality) #1.25, packed in casks 
or cases 16c., bagging and papering 10c., 50 
and 100-lb. bundles 10c, in 25-lb. bundles 
15c, in 5 and 10-lb. bundles 25c, in 1-lb. 
hanks, 50c, in $-lb. hanks 75c, in 1-lb. 
hanks $1. 

Fine Steel Wire, discount 25 per cent. 
List of extras: In 100-lb. lots: No. 17, 
$5— No. 18, $5.50— No. 19, $6-No. 20, $6.65— 
No. 21, $7— No. 22, 87.30— No. 23, $7,65— No 
24, $8-No. 25, $9-No. 26, $9.50-No. 27, 
$10-No. 28, $ll-No. 29, $12-No. 30, $13-^ 
No.31, S14— No. 32, $15— No. 33, $16-No. 34, 
$17. Extras net— tinned wire, Nos. 17-25, 
$2-Nos. 26-31, $4— Nos. 32-34, $6. Coppered. 
5c— oiling. 10c— in 25-lb. bundles,.15c— in 5 
and 10-lb. bundles, 25c— in 1-lb. hanks, 25c. 
—in $-lb. hanks, 38c— in J-lb. hanks, 50c— 
packed in casks or cases, 15c. —bagging or 
papering, 10c. 
Brass wire, discount 60 per cent, off the list. 
Cupper wire, discount 60 per cent, net cash 

30 days, f.o.b factory. 
Galvanized wire, per 100 lb.— Nos. 4 and 5 
$3.70 to $3.70-Nos. 6, 7, 8, $3.15 to $3 16 
—No. 9, $2.55 - No. 10, $3.20 to $3.20 
-No. 11, $3.25 to $3 25 - No. 12, $2 6" 
-No. 13, $2.75-No. 14. $3.75 to $3.75— No 
15, $4.30— No. 16. $4.30. Base sizes, Nos. 
6 to 9, $2.27$ f.o.b. Cleveland. In carloU 
12$c less. 
Clothes Line Wire, regular 7 strand, No. 17, 
$4.65; No. 18. $2.90; No. 19, $2.60. Hollow 
6 strand, No. 17, $4.30; No. 18, $2.70; No 
19, $2.35 ; No. 20, $2.30, f.o b. Hamilton, 
Toronto, Montreal. 

WIRE FENCING 

Galvanized barb , 275 

Galvanized, plain twist 2 80 

Galvanized barb, f.o.b. Cleveland, $2 55$ in 
less than carlots, and $2 45 in carlots. 

COILED SPRING WIRE. 

High Carbon, No. 9 $2 70 

No. 11 3 3a 

No. 12 2 95 

WIRE CLOTH. 

Painted Screen, per 100 sq. ft., net. . 1 5B 
Terms, 2 per cent, off 30 days. 

WASHING MACHINES 

Round, re-acting, per doz 56 00 

Square " " 69 Oil 

Eclipse, per doz 48 00 

Dowswell " 36 00 

New Century, per doz 72 00 

WRINGERS. 

Leader per doz. 30 00 33 00 

Royal Canadian " .... 24 0» 

Royal American ' 14 00 

Sampson ' .... 24 00 

Lightning ' .... W« 

Terms, 4 months, or 3 per cent. 30 dap*. 
WROUGHT IRON WA8BBR8. 
Canadian make, discount 40 pec cent 



65 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



INDEX TO ADVERTISERS. 



Alibey Improved Chilled Shot Co 9 

Adams Oo 51 

American Axe and Tool Co 25 

American Shearer Mfg. Co 50 

American Steel and Wire Co 8 

Atkins, E. C, & Co 59 

Alias Mfg. Co 55 

Auer Light Co 45 

Australasian Hardware 5 

Harnett. B. ft H Co ... . outside back cover 

Haul, It. Will., & Son 25 

Butty Stove and Hardware Co 51 

Baylies, Charles 55 

Hud. .1. A. ft W„ SCo 59 

Birkett, Thos , S Son Co 2 

Bliss, K, Mfg. Co 68 

Boker, H , St Co outside front cover 

Booth Copper Co .......... 68 

Bowman, John, Hardwares Coal Co.. b 

Bradst reel's "8 

I haul foul Cordage Co 43 

Brit ish America Assurance Co bl 

Canada Corundum Co 19 

Canada Foundry Co 19 

Canada Hardware Co 16 

Canada lion Furnace Co 35 

Canada Metal Co 19 

Canada Paint Co 46 

Canada Paper Co 9 

Canadian Bank of Commerce 61 

Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co 7 

Canadian Oil Co 45 

Canadian RubberCo 1 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co. 59 

Condensed Ma hinery Advts 20 

Confederation Life Assn 61 

Consumers' Cordage Co 4 

Contract Record 58 

Covert. Mfg. Co 50 

Cullen, Orlan Clyde 58 

Cults, C. M. fcCo 55 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co 51 

Deseron f o Iron Co 35 



Dods, P. D., & Co 47 

Dominion Belting Co 21 

Dominion Radiator Co. outside front cover 

Dominion Wire Mfg Co 8 

Dundas Axe Works 9 

Enterprise Mfg. Co 66 

Erie Spscialty Co b8 

Fairbanks Co 16 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co 50 

Gibb, Alexander 58 

Gillett. E. W., Co,, Ltd 43 

Globe Brass Works 21 

Grand River Metal Works 6 

Greening, B., Wire Co 8 

Grose, Walter 36 

Crove Chemical Co 47 

tUirney Foundry Co 53 

Gurney Scale Co 53 

Gutta Percha and Rubber Mfg. Co 

outside back cover 

Hamilton Bridge Works Co 63 

Hamilton Mica Rooting Co 59 

Hamilton Steel and Iron Co 16 

Hanover Portland Cement Co 55 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co 21 

Heinisch, R., Sons Co 21 

Henderson & Potts Co 44 

Howland, H. S.,Sons&Co 15 

Hvde, F. & Co 35 

Imperial Varnish and Color Co 42 

Ironside, Son & Co 68 

Iver Johnson Arms and Cycle Works.. 14 

Ives, H. R. Co 59 

Jackson, C. F.. & Co 35 

Jardine, A. B., & Co 55 

Jenking, AC 59 

Kemp Mfg. Co 10 

Kerr Engine Co 19 



Leslie, A. C, & Co 35 

Lewis Bros. & Co 3 

Lewis, Rice, & Son inside front cover 

London Guarantee and Accident Co . . 61 
London Rolling Mill Co. inside back cover 

Lufkin Rule Co inside back cover 

Luxf er Prism Co 45 

Lyaaght, John outside front cover 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co 9 

Merrick, Anderson & Co 41 

Metallic Roofing Co 37 

Metal Shingle and Siding Co 56 

Metropolitan Bank 61 

Montreal Steel Works 58 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co 36 

Morton, B. K., & Co 35 

McArthur, Alex., & Co 62 

McArthur, Corneille & Co 43 

McCaskill, Dougall & Co 47 

McClary Mfg. Co 28 

McDougall, R., Co 35 

McGregor- Banwell Fence Co 9 

McNally, W., & Co 59 

Newman, W. ( & Sons ' 19 

Nickel Plate Stove Polish Co. 58 

Nicklin, John, & Co 5 

Nobles & Hoare 47 

North Bros. Mfg. Co 1 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co 35 

Oakey, John, & Sons 68 

Oil and Colourman's Journal 50 

Oneida Community 8 

Ontario Silver Co 9 

Ontario Tack Co 12 

Ormsby, A. B., Co 58 

Owen Sound Wire Fence Co 9 

Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co 51 

Parsons-Irons Co 9 



Paterson Mfg. Co 64 

Pedlar People 55 

Penberthy Injector Co 19 

Phillips, Chas. D 55 

Philip, David 36 

Pullman Mnfg. Co 19 

Ramsay, A. , & Son 53 

Remington Arms Co 65 

Ridout, Geo. , & Co 47 

Rogers, Henry, & Sons 55 

Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co 2 

Sadler & Haworth outside back cover 

Samuel, M. & L., Benjamin, & Co 2 

Seymour, Henry T, Shear Co 21 

Sharratt & Newth 36 

Shaw, A. , & Son 58 

Sherwin-Williams Co 13 

Silberstein, A. L., & Co l 

Slingsby, H. C 19 

Smith, Hemenway & Co 36 

Solarine MetalPolish 47 

Spramotor Co 42 

Standard Paint and VarniBh Works... 47 

Standard Silver Co 28 

Stephens, G. F.,& Co 41 

St. George, H. E 47 

Syracuse Smelting Works 21 

Taylor-Forbes Co 10 

Tees & Co 60 

Thompson, B. & S. H., Co. outside back cover 

Thome, R. E 47 

United Factories 49 

Wallace Barnes Co 9 

Walter, E. F., & Co 5 

Western Assurance Co 61 

Western Foundry Co inside back cover 

Western Wire Nail Co 9 

Wilcox Mfg. Co 5 

Wright, E. T„ 4 Co 50 




66 



June 4, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



CLASSIFIED LIST OF ADVERTISEMENTS. 



Accountants and Auditors. 

Burlier, Henry & Co., Toronto. 
Fahey, Win., Toronto. 
Hoskins, David, Toronto. 
Jenkins & Hardy, Toronto. 
Kidd, P. II., Toronto. 
Merson, Geo. O., Toronto. 
Williamson, T. G., Toronto. 

Anvils. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Art Glass 

St. George, H. E., London, Ont. 

Axes, Hatchets, Scythes, etc, 

American Axe and Tool Co., Montreal. 
Dundas Axe Works, Duiulas, Ont. 

Babbitt Metal. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co.. Montreal and Toronto. 
Langwell's, Montreal. 
Syracuse Smelting Works, Montreal. 

Barristers, Solicitors, etc. 

Atwater, Duclos & Chauvin, Montreal. 
Beatty, Blackstock, Fasken & Riddell, 

Toronto. 
Burritt, James H., K.C., Pembroke, Out. 
Cameron, D. O., Toronto. 
Hamilton, J. C, Toronto. 
Tapper, Phippen & Tupper, Winnipeg. 
Vidal, I. L. O., Montmaguy and Quebec. 

Belting, Hose, etc. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Dominion Belting Co., Hamilton. 
Gutta Pereha and Rubber Mfg. Co., 

Toronto. 
Pullman Mfg. Co., Rochester, N.Y. 
Sadler & Haworth, Montreal & Toronto. 

Bicycles and Sundries. 

Milieu, John, & Son, Montreal. 

Bird Cages. 

Wright, E. T., & Co., Hamilton. 

Brass Goods. 

Jones & Barclay, Birmingham, 
fcewis, Rice, & Son., Toronto. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Nicklin, J., & Co., Birmingham, Eug. 
Penberthy Injector Co. , Windsor, Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Brushes and Brooms. 
United Factories, Toronto. 

Carpenters' and Builders' Tools 
and Supplies. 

Atkins, E. C, & Co., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Bayues, Chas., Blackburn, Eng. 
Bliss, R., Mfg. Co., Pawtucket, R.I. 
Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Howland, H. S. Sons & Co., Toronto. 
Hyde, F., & Co., Montreal. 
Ives, H. R, Co., Montreal. 
Lamplough, F. W. & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis Bros, & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son, Toronto. 
Lufkin Rule Co., Saginaw, Mich. 
McNally, W., & Co., Montreal. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 
Metal Shingle & Siding Co., Preston, Ont. 
Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Newman & Sons, Birmingham. 
North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Ontario Tack Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Ormsby, A. B., & Co., Toronto. 
Pedlar People, Oshawa, Ont. 
Phillips, Chas. D., Newport, Eng. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., New Britain. 

Conn. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
Wilcox Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Carriage and Waggon Ac- 
cessories. 

Covert Mfg. Co., West Troy, N.Y. 
Cash Registers. 

Hallwood Cash Register Co., Toronto. 

Churns. 

Maxwell, David, & Sons, St. Marys. 

Clippers — All Kinds. 

American Shearer Mfg. Co.,Nashua,N.H. 
Barton-Gillette Horse Clipping Co., Lon- 
don, Eug. 
Boker, Henry, Montreal. 
Km man & Sons, Birmingham, Eng. 

Cordage. 

Brantford Cordage Co., Brantford. 
Canadian Cordage and Mfg. Co., Peter- 
borough, Ont. 
Consumers' Cordage Co., Montreal. 
Hamilton Cotton Co., Hamilton. 

Corundum. 

Canada Corundum Co., Toronto. 

Cutlery — Razors, Scissor^, etc. 

Birkett, Thos., & Son Co., Ottawa. 
Boker, Henry, Montreal. 
Butler, Geo.. & Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Heinisch's, R., Sons Co., Newark, N.J. 
Lamplough, F. W., & Co., Montreal. 
Silberstein, A. L. , New York. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 
Walter, E. F.. * Co., Montreal. 
Wiebusch & Hilger, New York. 



Educational. 

Belleville Business College, Belleville. 
Canadian Corr. College, Toronto. 
St. Margaret's College, Toronto. 
Willis Business College, Ottawa, Ont. 
Western Business College, Toronto. 

Electric fixtures. 

Morrison James, Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
Munderloh 4: Co., Montreal. 

Electro-Plating. 

Sutherland, D., Toronto. 

Engravers. 

Legg Bros., Toronto. 
Smith, Geo. J., New York. 

I-'iles and Rasps. 

Barnett Co., G. & H., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Einancial Institutions. 

Bradstreet Co. 

British America Assurance Co., Toronto. 
Canadian Bank of Commerce, Toronto. 
Confederation Life Ass., Toronto. 
Liverpool & London & Globe Ins. Co., 

Toronto. 
London Guarantee and Accident Ins. 

Co., Toronto. 
Metropolitan Bank, Toronto. 
Western Assurance Co., Toronto. 

Firearms and Ammunition. 

Abbey Improved Chilled Shot Co., New- 
castle-on-Tyne, Eng. 

Hamilton Rifle Co., Plymouth, Mich. 

Harrington & Richardson Arms Co., 
Worcester, Mass. 

Iver Johnson's Arms and Cycle Works, 
Fitchburg, Mass. 

Remington Arms Co., Ilion, N.Y. 

Savage Arms Co., Utica, N.Y. 

Union Metallic Cartridge Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn. 

Walter, E. F, & Co., Montreal. 

Flat Irons. 

Ives, H. R., Co., Montreal. 

Food Choppers 

Enterprise Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Lamplough, F. W., & Co., Montreal. 
Russell & Erwin Mfg. Co., New Britain, 

Conn. 
Smith & Hemenway Co., New York. 

Gas Lamps and Sundries. 

Auer Light Co.. Montreal. 
Glaziers' Diamonds. 

Sharratt & Newth, London, Eng. 
Shaw, A., & Son, London, Eng. 

Glue. 

Grove Chemical Co., Lancashire, Eng. 

Gold Enamel. 

Ridout, Geo., & Co., Toronto. 

Hardware Specialties. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

Horseshoe Pads. 

Canadian Rubber Co., Montreal. 

Horseshoes and Nails. 

Canada Horse Nail Co. , Montreal. 
Peck Rolling Mills, Montreal. 

Ice Cream Freezeis. 

White Mountain Freezer Co., Nashua, 
N H. 

Ice Cutting Tools. 

Erie Specialty Co., Erie, Pa. 

North Bros. Mfg. Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Injectors — Automatic. 

Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor, Ont. 

Iron Pipe. 
Page-Hersey Iron and Tube Co., Guelph. 

Iron Pumps. 

McDougall, R., Co., Gait, Ont. 
Keys. 

Millen, John & Son, Montreal. 

Lanterns. 

Ontario Lantern Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
vV right, E. T., & Co., Hamilton. 

Lawn Mowers. 

Maxwell, David, & Sons, St. Marys Ont. 
Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Ledgers and Office Stationery. 

Briggs Ledger System Co., Toronto. 
Hart & Riddell, Toronto. 
Weese.G. A. & Son, Toronto. 

Lumbermen' s Supplies. 

Birkett. Thos., & Sou Co., Ottawa. 
Warnoek, Jas., &. Co., Gait. 

Lve. 

Gillett, E. W., Co., Limited, Toronto. 

Machinery. 

Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Globe Brass Works, Detroit. 
Jardine, A. B., & Co., Hespeler, Ont. 
Kerr Engine Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Morrow MachineScrew Co., IngersoU.Ont. 
Ontario Wind Engine and Pump Co., 

Toronto. 
Penberthy Injector Co., Windsor. 



Mantels. 

Batty Stove and Hardware Co., Toronto. 

Manufacturers' Agents. 

Gibb, Alexander. Montreal. 
Philip, David, Winnipeg. 

Metals. 

Booth Copper Co., Toronto. 

Canada Iron Furnace Co., Midland, Ont. 

Canada Metal Co., Toronto. 

Deseronto Iron Co., Deseronto, Ont. 

Gibb, Alexander, Montreal. 

Ironside, Son & Co., London, Eng. 

Jackson, C. F., & Co., Vancouver, B.C. 

Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Leslie, A. C. & Co., Montreal. 

London Rolling Mills Co., London, Ont. 

Lysaght, John, Bristol, Eng. 

Morton, B. K., & Co., Sheffield, Eng. 

Nova Scotia Steel and Coal Co., New 

Glasgow, N.S. 
Peck Rolling Mills, Montreal. 
Rogers, Henry, Sons & Co., Montreal. 
Samuel, Benjamin & Co., Toronto. 
Thompson, B. & S. H. & Co., Montreal. 

Metal Lath. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 
Pedlar People, Oshawa, Ont. 

Metal Polish, Emery Cloth, etc. 

Falkiner, H. F. Toronto. 

Oakey, John, & Sons, London, Eng. 

Metallic Window Screens. 
Cutts, C. M., & Co., Toronto Junction. 

Milk Cans and Trimmings. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Kemp Mfg. Co., Toronto. 
McClary Mfg. Co., London, Ont. 

Office Furniture. 

Tees & Co., Montreal. 

Paints, Oils and Glass, 

Berry Bros., Detroit and Wallaceburg. 
Canada Paint Co. , Montreal. 
Canadian Oil Co. , Toronto. 
Consolidated Plate Glass Co., Toronto. 
Dods, P. D., & Co., Montreal. 
Francis-Frost Co. , Toronto. 
Henderson & Potts, Montreal and 

Halifax. 
Imperial Varnish and Color Co., Toronto. 
Jamieson, R. C, & Co., Montreal. 
Lucas, John, & Co., Philadelphia, Pa. 
Luxfer Prism Co., Toronto. 
Mc Arthur, Corneille & Co., Montreal. 
McCaskill, Dougall & Co., Montreal. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 
Nobles & Hoare, London, Eng. 
Queen City Oil Co., Toronto. 
Ramsay & Son, Montreal.- 
Ridout, Geo., & Co., Toronto. 
Sherwin-Williams Co., Montreal. 
Standard Paint and Varnish Works, 

Windsor, Out. 
Stephens, G. F„ &Co., Winnipeg. 
Thorne, R. E., Montreal. 

Patent Solicitor. 

Cullen, Orlan Clyde, Washington, DC. 

Perforated Sheet Metals. 

Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 

Plumbers' Supplies. 

Jardine, A. B., & Co , Hespeler, Ont. 
Morrison, Jas., Brass Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Portland Cement. 

Hanover Portland Cement Co, Han- 
over, Ont. 
Hyde, F., & Co., Montreal. 
McNally, W., & Co., Montreal. 
Thompson, B. & S. H. & Co., Montreal. 

Radiators, Furnaces, Stoves, 
Tinware, etc. 

Adams Co., Dubuque, Iowa. 
Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Dominion Radiator Co., Toronto, Ont. 
Gurney Foundry Co., Toronto. 
Kemp Mnfg. Co., Toronto. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 
Western Foundry Co., Wingham. 
Wright, E. T.,& Co., Hamilton. 

Refrigerators. 

Davidson, Thos., Mfg. Co., Montreal. 
Roofing Supplies. 

Bird. J. A. & W., & Co., Boston. 

Hamilton Mica Roofing Co., Hamilton. 

Jenking, A. O, Montreal. 

McArthur, Alex.. & Co., Montreal 

Metal Shingle k Siding Co. .Preston, < )nt. 

Metallic Roofing Co., Toronto. 

Ormsby, A. B., & Co., Toronto. 

Paterson Mfg. Co., Toronto & Montreal. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 

Safes. 
Taylor, J. & J., Toronto. 

Saws 

Atkins, E. C, &Co., Indiauapolis, Ind. 

Scales. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal and Toronto. 
Gu.'ney Scale Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 



Screen Doors and Windows. 

United Factories, Toronto. 
Screws, Nuts, Holts. 

Canada Foundry Co., Toronto. 

Morrow, John, Machine Screw Co., 
lngersoll, Ont. 

Sewer Pipes. 

Canadian Sewer Pipe Co., Hamilton 
Hyde, F., &. Co., Montreal. 
McNally & Co., Montreal. 

ShelfBoxes. 

Bennett Mfg. Co., Pickering, Out. . 

Shelf Brackets. 

Atlas Mfg. Co., New Haven. Conn. 
Grand River Metal WorkB, Gait, Ont. 

Ship Chandlery. 

Lewis, Rice, & Son, Toronto. 

Silver-Plated Ware. 

Ontario Silver Co., Niagara Kails. 
Toronto Silver Plate Co., Toronto. 
Standard Silver Co., Toronto. 

Si>vamotors. 

Spramotor Co., London, Ont. 

Sporting Goods. 

Lewis, Rice, & Son, Toronto. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. ' 

Springs. 

Wallace, Barnes Co. , Bristol, Conn. 

Stamps, Stencils, etc. 

Parsons-Irons Co., Toronto. 

Steel Castings. 

Hamilton Bridge Works, Hamilton. 
Hamilton Steel and Iron Co., Hamilton. 
Montreal Steel Works, Montreal. 

Steel Rails. 

Jackson, C. F., & Co., Vancouver, B.C. 
Morton, B. K, & Co., Sheffield, Eng. 
Nova Scotia Steel & Coal Co., New Glas- 
gow, N.S. 

Stock Food. 

Colonial Stock Food Co., Toronto. 
International Stock Food Co., Toronto. 

Store Lighting. 

Auer Light Co., Montreal. 
Grose, Walter, Montreal. 

Stove Polish. 

Nickel Plate Stove Polish Co., Chicago. 

Structural Iron and Steel Work. 

Hamilton Bridge Works Co., Hamilton. 

Tents, Awnings, etc. 

Bartlett, Wm., & Son, Toronto. 

Toasters. 

Fairgrieve Mfg. Co., Toronto. 

Traps. 

Mast, J. M., Mfg. Co., Lititz, Pa. 

Vises. 
Lamplough, F. W., & Co., Montreal. 

Wall Paper. 

Staunton's Limited, Toronto. 

Wall Paper Cleaner. 

Ridout, Geo., & Co., Toronto. 
Warehouse Trucks. 

Fairbanks Co., Montreal. 
Slingsby, H. C, Montreal. 

Washing Machines, etc. 

Dowswell Mfg. Co., Hamilton, Ont. 
Taylor Forbes Co. , Guelph, Ont. 

Wholesale Hardware. 

Birkett, Thos., & Sons Co., Ottawa. 
Bowman, John, Hardware & Coal Co 

London, Ont. 
Canada Hardware Co., Montreal. 
Caverhill, Learmont & Co., Montreal. 
Howland, H. 8.,-Sons & Co., Toronto. 
Lewis Bros. & Co., Montreal. 
Lewis, Rice, & Son, Toronto. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 

Wire, Wire Rope, Cow Ties, 
Fencing Tools, etc. 

American Steel and Wire Co., New 

York, Montreal, Chicago. 
Dennis Wire and Iron Co., London, Ont. 
Dominion Wire Mnfg. Co., Montreal and 

Toronto. 
Greening, B., Wire Co., Hamilton. 
Ironside, Son & Co., London, Eng. 
London Fence Machine Co., London, Ont. 
McGregor - Banwell Fence Co., Windsor, 

Ont. 
Merrick, Anderson & Co., Winnipeg. 
Oneida Community, Niagara Falls. 
Owen Sound Wire Fence Co., Owen Sound 
Page Wire Fence Co., Walkerville, Ont. 
Peck Rolling Mills Co., Montreal. 
Walter. E. F. s Co., Montreal. 
Western Wire & Nail Works, London, Ont. 

Woodenware. 

Taylor-Forbes Co., Guelph, Ont. 
United Factories, Toronto. 

Wrapping Papers. 

Canada Paper Co., Toronto. 
McArthur, Alex., & Co., Montreal. 



67 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 4, 1904 



Al l/r ||| f| The original and only Genuine 

1 1 fll| b ¥ \ Preparation for Cleaning Cut. 

W UfllXL I U It'T- 6d. alld l8 - Canisters 

'WELLINGTON' 

KNIFE POLISH 

JOHN OAKEY & SONS, LIMITED 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Emery, Black Lead, Emery, Glass and 
Flint Cloths and Papers, etc. 

Wellington Mills, London, England 

Agent : 

JOHN FORHAN, 644 Craig Street 

MONTREAL. 



No one else 
will do it. 

WE CUT 

BRASS and COPPER 

—SHEETS 

—RODS 

-TUBING 

to your order — any size. (^uick 
Shipments. 



The Booth Copper Co., 

LIMITED, 
119-123 Queen St. East, 
TORONTO- 



IRONSIDE FOR IRON 

BR, R Tfs P H EC AN A D L Vo E R S ElG R S IRON, STEEL, METALS, BARS, PLATES, 
SHEETS. BOLTS and NUTS, TIN PLATES, Etc. 

Sole Licencees for PAGE'S PATENT WIRE STRETCHER, and we 

are willing to sell the right of manufacture in Canada on a Royalty basis. 

IRONSIDE'S PATENT WIRE CUTTERS, guaranteed to cut any wire 

Wo publish a "Canadian Metal Price List" monthly. Quotations in Dollar* and Cents. 
(C.I.F.) We will send this, and our "Weekly Market Report" on receipt of address. 






IRONSIDE, SON & CO.. 



16 Water Lane 

Gt. Tower St., 

E. C 



London, Eng. 




75 YBARS 



ESTABLISHED 1825. 



75 YEARS 



Want Ads. 



In this paper cost 2 cents per word first 
insertion, 1 cent per word subsequent in- 
sertions. Contractions count as one word 
but five figures (such as $1,000) may pass 
as one word. Cash remittance to cover 
cost must in all cases accompany orders, 
otherwise we cannot insert the advertise- 
ment. When replies come in our care 5 
cents additional must be included for for- 
warding same. Many large business deals 
have been brought about through adver- 
tisements of 20 or 30 words. Clerks can be 
secured, articles sold and exchanged, at 
small expenditure. 

MacLEAN PUBLISHING CO., Limited 
Montreal and Toronto. 



CHAS F. CLARK, President. 



CHAS. L. BECKWITH, Secretary. 



...ESTABLISHED 1849... 



Capital and Surplus, $1,500,000. Offices Throughout the Civilized World. 

Executive Offices: Nos. 346 and 348 Broadway, New York City, U.S.A. 

THE BRADSTREET COMPANY gathers information that reflects the financial condition and 
the controlling circumstances of every seeier o mercantile credit. Its business may be defined as of the 
merchants, by the merchants, for the merchants. In procuring, verifying and promulgating information no 
effort is spared, and no reasonable expense considered too great, that the results may justify its claim as an 
authority on all matters affecting commercial affairs and mercantile credit. Its offices and connections have 
been steadily extended, and it furnishes information concerning mercantile persons throughout the 
civilized world. 

Subscriptions are based on the service furnished, and are available only by reputable wholesale, jobbing 
and manufacturing concerns, and by responsible and worthy financial, fiduciary and business corporations. 
Specific terms may be obtained by addressing the Company at any of its offices. Correspondence Invited. 



-OFFICES IN CANADA- 



HALIFAX. N 8. 
OTTAWA, ONT. 
VANCOUVER, B.C. 



HAMILTON, ONT. 
QUEBEC, QUE. 



LONDON, ONT. 
ST. JOHN, N.B, 
WINNIPEG, MAN. 



MONTREAL, QUE. 
TORONTO, ONT, 



TH0S. C. IRVING, Gen. Man. Western Canada. Toronto. 




68 



IRON 



Bars in Flats, Rounds, Squares, 
Ovals, Half Ovals, Half-Roundsand 
Bands. Also Wrought Washers. 

QOOD QUALITY. PROIIPT SHIPMENT. 



London Rolling Mill Co. 

Limited, 
LONDON, CANADA. 



1STEELI 




LUFKIN 



MEASURING TAPES 

Steel, Metallic, Linen, Pocket, Ass Skin, 

Pat. Leather, Bend Leather, Etc 

ARE THE BEST AND MOST POPULAR TAPES IN THE WORLD. 
YOUR STOCK IS NOT COMPLETE WITHOUT THEM. 

LUFKIN RULE CO., Saginaw, Mich, U.S.A. 

Now York City Branch-280 Broadway. 

For sale by ALL PROMINENT CANADIAN HARDWARE JOBBERS. 



* 




Don't sell Range* 
that aren't all right. 



-People don't want just nickel wortt 
or outlines, when buying a range. 

-They want ranges, pretty and grace- 
ful of course, but most of all, they 
want a range to cook with. 

Perfect cooking qualities, combined 
with .simplicity, economy and beauty. 

— Every GOOD thing is found in 

Huron Steel Ranges 



l M.JKWKUK 



Send for om Catalooi f 



The Western Foundry Co-, Limited, 



WINOHAM, 



OIM' 





Est. 1868 



Inc. 1895. 



Black Diamond File Works 

G. & H. Barnett Company 

PHILADELPHIA 

Twelve ^t^^Z*** Medals 




Awarded 
By JURORS at 

International Expositions 
Special Prize 

Gold Medal at Atlanta, 1895 




k*/»'«t«'^%/«/V%/%/%*,<%*/%'%/%/%,<W%'%/«/»/%r-< 



Numerous Buildings 
in the Fire District 

in the f^cent Toronto Con- 
flagration were saved from 
destruction by their own private 
Fire Hose, purchased from us 
by owners who were long- 
headed enough to know the 
value of such protection. Are 
you in need ? If so, don't de- 
lay, but write us at once for 
prices. 

THE GUTTA PERCHA & RUBBER MFG. CO. 

OF TORONTO, LIMITED. 

Temporary Offices: 

15 East Wellington Street, Toronto. 

Branches-MONTREAL, WINNIPEG. 



PORTLAND CEMENT 



For import orders we are now prepared 
to quote prices for^^a*^- 

Best English Cement, "White's" 
Best German Cement 
Best Belgian Cement 
Natural Belgian Cement 

In Barrels or Sacks 



B. & S. H. THOMPSON & CO. 

LIMITED 

§3 St. Sulpice Street, MONTREAL. 



SADLER * n/IWeRTH 



MAKING 
LEATHER BELTS 



is our s 



pecial 



msiness. 



A 



s we 



•e always improving our pro- 

better 



cesses, we are 



making 
ever 



bet 



ore. 



bel^s to-day that 

If it is quality that you want, 

ask us about our brands 

Extra Standard 

Diamond Agricultural 



Montreal, Toronto. 



Classified List of Advertisements on page 67. 



STERLING VALUE 
LANGWELL'S BABBIT, MONTREAL, 



HARDWARE-METAL 

AND CANADIAN MACHINIST 

A. WeeKly Newspaper devoted to the Hardware, Metal, Machinery, 
Heating and Plumbing' Trades in Canada. 



VOL. XVI. 



MONTREAL AND TORONTO, JUNE II, 1904. 



NO. 24 




( S 



MARK /iP' 



TLERYs> 



FOR SALE BY LEADING WHOLESALE HARDWARE HOUSES. 



THE STANDARD OF THE WORLD. 




bTTyTtT 



CANADA 

Its quality has made it so. 



JOHN LYSAGHT, Limited, Makers, A. C. LESLIE & CO., MONTREAL 
BRISTOL, ENG. Managers Canadian Branch. 




Before placing your orders 
elsewhere, secure our 

New Prices 



on- 



IRON PIPE, BLACK AND 

GALVANIZED. 
CAST FITTINGS. 
MALL FITTINGS. 
GALVANIZED FITTINGS. 
HEADERS. 
BRASS VALVES. 
IRON BODY VALVES. 
STEAM SPECIALTIES AND 
ENGINEERS' SUPPLIES. 

Large Stock. Prompt Shipment. 



THE DOMINION RADIATOR CO. 

Limited 

Head Office and Works-Dufferln St., TORONTO, 

Branches— Montreal, Quebec, St. John, N.B., 
Winnipeg, and Vancouver, B. p. 




I ll^^tf 






Churns 



and ICE 

SUPPLIES 



RETURNED 




RE'i Ui,,mED 




ICE SHREDDER <^\ ~ 



<& ., p ENTERPRISE 




Js 



ICE SHREDDER 



ICE SHREDDER 



Get m^j^i CREAM FREEZERS 



RETURN 




URNED 




THE DAISY CHURN 

With Steel or Iron Frame 



ICE TONGS 



THE LEADER CHURN 

With Steel or Iron Frame 



WRITE FOR TRADE PRICES. 

RICE LEWIS 




SON 



LIMITED 



TORONTO. 



June 11, 1901 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



HORSE CLIPPER 
MAKERS 


^^^r 


TO HIS MAJESTY 
THE KING. 


The BARTON GILLETTE HORSE 


CLIPPING and SHEEP SHEARING CO., 


103 NEW OXFORD ST., LONDON. W.C. Limited 


SOMETHING ENTIRELY NEW IN HAND CLIPPERS. 




iiesiaa 






THE 


lfll[fc*»2^rv^£jy li 1 




THE 


CORONATION. 


Og £^V eo8 /ffl Hf 


CORONATION. 


Fitted with our 




The plates aie 


Patent Ball Race 


K / ^k \ 


considerably wid- 


which has enabled 


II Yn\ 


er than those sup- 


us to secure all 


1 / lul 


plied with any 


prizes and medals 


U \I 


other Clipper, thus 


awarded for Horse 




enabling the user 


Clipping and 




to do more work. 


Sheep Shearing 


&/ 'Ei ■ 


PATENT ANT1-FRIC- 


MacfTinery. 




TIONAL LEVERS 
and BEST FINISH. 






USED EXCLUSIVELY 
IN THE 

Royal Stables. 


1 USED EXCLUSIVELY 
1 IN THE 

R Royal Stables. 



AWARDED 2 FIRST PRIZES ROYAL SHOW OF ENGLAND BEATING ALL 
COMERS, AND 12 MEDALS AT VARIOUS AGRICULTURAL SHOWS. 
Send for Illustrated Catalogue and Terms. Agents wanted everywhere. 
THE BARTON GILLETTE POWER CLIPPERS used ex- 
clusively IN THE STABLES of: — H. M. The King, H.R.H. The 
Prince of Wales, H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught, and all 

THE LEADING NOBILITY AND GENTRY. 



THE CANADIAN RUBBER CO. 

of Montreal. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



<7 



Rubber Belting, 
Mose, Packing, 
Valves, Gaskets, 



ETC, ETC. 



We make a specialty of 

HORSE SHOE PADS 

the best in the market. 



Write for Price* and Circulars. 



Head Office : : MONTREAL 

BRANCHES-TORONTO, WINNIPEG and VANCOUVER 



Other Tools are very 
good Tools, but 



"YANKEE TOOLS" 



ARE 
BETTER 




Our "YANKEE" Tool Book 
tells all about them. M ailed 
free on application 



No. 15. "Yankee" Ratchet Screw Driver, with Finger Turn on Blade. 




No. 30. "Yankee" Spiral-Ratchet Screw Driver, Right and Left Hand. 




No. 41. "Yankee" Automatic Drill, Eight Drill Points In Handle. 




Manufacturers also oi 

LIGHTNING, 

GEM and 

BLIZZARD 
Ice Cream Freezers. 

Toy Freezers, 

Ice Shaves and 

Ice Chipper s. 
Fluting Machines, 

Hand Fluters. 



No. 0. "Yankee " Reciprocating Drill for Iron. Steel, Brass, Wood. etc. 



Sold by Leading Jobbers 
in Canada. 




No. 60. 

Pocket Magaxlne 

Screw Driver. 



NORTH BROS. MFG. CO., 

Philadelphia, Pa., U.S.A. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 11, 1904 



LIMITED 



THOS. BIRKETT & SON CO., 

LIMIT 

Wholesale Hardware Merchants, 

OTTAWA, ONT. 



^ 



In introducing 

The 

Universal 
Bread 
Maker 

we do so with confidence, 
knowing it will do all that 
is said of it. 

To mix and knead 
bread in 3 minules may 
seem extravagant, but it 
is a fact 

Here is a 

MIXER, KNEADER and RAISER 

ALL IN ONE. 

The old and disagreeable task of Bread-making is done away with. 
We shall be pleased to send booklets for your customers, and give prompt 
attention to your sample order. 




=«ae^ 



DELIGHTED 

Bridget will be delighted 
with the Russwin Food 
Cutter. It makes her work - 
easier, pleasanter — gives 
widest scope to her skill, 
and does most in least time. 
Just try it. For sale every- 
where. Made by 

RUSSELL & ERWIN MFG. CO. 
NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



-FOR SALE BY— 

The KENNEDY HARDWARE CO , Limited 

49 Colborne St.. TODONTO, ONT. 



We have now in stock a full line of the following: 



J 



O 
GALVANIZED SHEETS, TINPLATES, 

BLACK SHEETS, CANADA PLATES, 

TINNED SHEETS, ZINC SHEETS, 

IMITATION RUSSIAN IRON, COPPER SHEETS, 
IRON PIPE, BRASS SHEETS, 

IRON and STEEL HOOPS. 

METALS, ANTIMONY, COPPER, TIN, LEAD, ZINC, 
PROMPT SHIPMENT. PRICES RIGHT. 



M. & L Samuel, Benjamin & Go 



503 Temple Building 

English House— 16 Philpot Lane, LONDON, ENGLAND. 



TORONTO. 



June 11, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




A Talk with Retailers 



Who controls the trade in your town ? — You or the other fellow, and why ? 
Aren't prices the same ? 
Doesn't he carry the same lines as you ? 
Then who has the greater assortment ? 

Do you realize that variety comes before low prices and heavy stocks ? 
Wouldn't it be better for you to have % -dozen wrenches each of four varieties, 

than 1 -dozen each of only two varieties ? —Answer. 
The same remark applies to the lines we illustrate. 
Our mail order system is for you to have the variety and to keep it complete. 





& * 



Fishing Reels. 





Single and Double Gut Hooks. 



~F\jn 



sagp= 



S©3= 



S^B- 



NJ- 



iii nL^li 




RODS, 

SILK LINES, 

FLOATS, 

HOOKS, 

LANDING NETS, 



Willow Leaf Trolling Baits 



TROUT FLIES. 



REELS, 
COTTON LINES, 
TROLLING SPOONS, 
SINKERS, 
GAFFS, 



LEWIS BROS. & CO. 



QUOTE 
LOW 



SHIP 
QUICK 



IMPORTERS AND DISTRIBUTORS. 



Address all Correspondence to 



V. 



TORONTO, 

87 York St. 



OTTAWa, 

54 Quean St. 



VANCOUVER, 
141 Water St. 



MONTREA 



J 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 11, 1904 



A^ H - l ^^ ^ ^ I » I ^^ l ^^ l " I ■^ ^^ ^ a ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ a ^^ l ^^ ^ ^ : ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^^ : ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ I ^ ^ ^ ^ ^^ ^ ^ l ^^ I ^^ I ^^^•H^H^^^ ! "Hr 



""I"!"!"!**; 



Cordage 

Of every description. 

INIet Mountings, 

Sand Line, 

Unoiled Cordage, 

IVIarline, 

Extra Long Lengths, 

Ratline, 

Shingle Y< 



arn. 



Mail 

Orders 

INlow 

To us and 

Receive 

Exceptional 

Attention. 

Low-priced goods are not always 
the cheapest. 



Core Rope, 

Oil Well Cables, 

Russian Packing, 

Deep Sea Lines, 

Anchor Line, 

Good Transmission Rope, 

Engine Packing. 

Clothes Lines, 

Only Best Material Used. 



Log Line 
[wine. 
*• Dangerous to use Inferior Cordage. 



4.- H - M -I H - I 'i I I I' I- M - M - M-l - M ' H-H I I I hH-H- a ^ a ^^ ^ ^ I ■ a ^ a ^^ I ^■ ^ ^ I ^ a ^ a ^■ ^a ^ a ^■ ^ ^ ^ ^ l ^^ l ^^ l ^^ I ^■ ^ ^ ^ ^ I ^^ ^ ^ I ^■ l ■■ I ^^ I ^■ ^ ■ I ^^ H ^^ ^ ^ I ^^ l ^^ l ^^ I ^^ l ^ 

4 



June 11, 19)1 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



WHEN YOU ORDER 
HORSE NAILS 



You will study your own interest by stating that you re- 
quire the "Q" Brand. 

We find that there are some dealers, who unless they re- 
ceive specific instructions for our Brand, will substitute other 
brands on which they make a larger profit, by selling them at 
the price for "Q" Brand Nails. This method is unfair to 
the purchaser and to ourselves. If the purchaser of Horse 
Nails pays the same price for any other Brand of Nails that 
he would for the "Q" Brand, he is paying too much ; as no 
other Brand of Nails made in Canada is sold by the 
makers at the same price as ours. They are the best judges 
of the value of their own goods, and as judged by their lower 
prices, they do not value their Nails to be equal to the "Q" 
Brand — and they are right. 

You cannot make a Nail equal to the "Q" Brand, except 
in the same way that the "£" Brand is made, and out of the 
same material. There are no works in Canada that use the 
same material as we do in the manufacture of our nails. It is 
a special quality, made especially for us in Sweden, and repre- 
sents the highest grade obtainable of Swedish Charcoal 
Siemens-Martin Steel Nail Rods. This is the best material 
known or used by any manufacturer in the world, for the 
purpose of making Horse Nails. 

The processes by which we make our nails are also used 
by no other works in Canada ; the result is, that we have a 
nail that is made from the best material and will stand the 
hardest usage required. By reason of its superior design and 
hardened needle point, it will drive into the hardest hoof and 
clinch perfectly, and will hold the shoes longer than any other. 
This fact being admitted, and is proved by the experience of 
thousands of Farriers from the Atlantic to the Pacific who can 
testify to this, it follows, that being the best, they are the 
cheapest to buy. 

You can buy any other Brand of nail from the wholesale 
dealer at from 25c. to 50c. a box less than the "Q" Brand. 
This bulks very large to some purchasers, but if an intelligent 
Farrier would consider that upon the quality of the nail the 
reputation and permanence of his work depends, he will when 
the facts are fairly presented use the best. Consider also that 
for every 25c. a box less, on the average size and quantity used 
in shoeing a horse, it only reduces the cost of the nails used 
}/$ of a cent ! There is no one so poor but that he can afford 
the best nails in view of this small difference in cost. 

We would respectfully urge every purchaser, who is not 
already a buyer of the "Q" Brand, to give them a thorough 
trial, and we feel satisfied that the results will prove all that 
we claim for them. 

We have been making Horse Nails in Canada since 1865, 
and our experience of 39 years is embodied in every box of 
nails bearing the "Q" Brand and our name. 

The preference for our Brand and make is respectfully 
requested. 

CANADA HORSE NAIL COMPANY, 

MONTREAL. 



T HE GURNE Y 

STANDARD SCALES 



Absolutely Accurate and Reliable. The Best of Materia I 
and Workmanship. Recognized throughout Canada aa 

"THE STANDARD" 




We make scales of every description. Established 1856. 
Send for catalogue and printed matter. 

The Gurney Scale Co., Hamilton ' 0nt . 

Eastern Warehouse : Western Warehouse : 

The Gurney Massey Co., Limited The Gurney Stove and Range Co. 
Montreal, Que. Winnipeg, Man. Limited, 




GILLETT'S LYE 

—IS GOOD FOR— 

Photographers 9 

and Machinists' uses 

Foundrymen, Bolt 
and Nut Makers. 



A large market for Gillett's Lye is thus provided. 



E. W. GILLETT COMPANY LIMITED 

TORONTO 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 11, 1901 




None so Blind 
As Those Who 
Won't See. 

Hardware and Metal can prove 
of valuable assistance to the selling 
end of any business which seeks 
trade among the hardwaremen and 
general storekeepers of Canada. 

We advance many plain, indis- 
putable arguments to this effect. 

And still there are some folks who 
can't see it. 

Some who can't see how it's going 
to pay them. 

And won't even invest a few dollars 
to find out. 

Very few folks like this, but we 
would like to convince even them. 

It we only could, we'd get a good 
deal of satisfaction out of it — and 
we know they would, too. 

Don't you think they're blind to 
their own interests ? 

Here's a paper that finds a wel- 
come in every worth-while hardware 
store from Halifax to Vancouver 
once every week — so can't you see 
that an announcement of any in- 
terest must surely command some 
attention ? 

The advertising columns of Hard- 
ware and Metal provide about the 
best way we know ot keeping in close 
touch with all the hardwaremen of 
Canada all the time. 

You can see value in a paper like 
this — 

Can't you ? 



Hardware and Metal 



a3* ncan St., 

MONTREAL. 



■ o Front St. B., 

TORONTO. 



\A/IIMDO\A/ and CURTAIN FIXTURES 

Our line oomprises all requisites, Fins, Hooks, 
Rings, Pole Ends, Brackets and Sockets We would 
like an opportunity of quoting you on these goods. 
Keep us in mind and when you want regular or 
special lines, let us know. 

JONES & BARCLAY, Bath Row, BIRMINGHAM, ENG. 




GLAZIERS' DIAMONDS 




Our diamonds were first on the market and still remain first with up-to-date Improvements. We claim 
for them Superiority over All Others in Quality and Workmanship. 

Glaziers' Diamonds of every description, for all purposes, supplied. Established 1815 

CANADIAN AGENT « C || ^ IA/ Xr Qrktl 

GODFREY S. PELTON *** ^l***™ *» «3Un 

338 st. Paul St., - Montreal 52 Rahere St., E.C , London 

STANLEY RULE k LEVEL CO., 

NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U.S.A. 



IMPROVED CARPENTERS' 
TOOLS. 



SOLD BY ALL HARDWARE 
DEALERS. 



You certainly could not read and digest 'our brief, 
but brim-full of business, little history of the 
Hamilton "Take-down" Rifle No. 19, and 
escape about such a thought as this: "Well, 
if that $2.50 22 gun actually is as handsome 
and all-round good as these people 
claim, there is a big field for it right 
here in my trade." 

Let us mail you that little " Hamil- 
ton" history and see what will happen. 
Shall we do so? 

The HAMILTON RIFLE CO., 

Box No. n. PLYMOUTH, MICH. 






/ 






June 11, 19 U 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Canadian Cordage 

& MFG. Co., Limited. 

BINDER TWINE. 






"ROYAL" MANILA, 650 ft. to the pound. 
"ROYAL " MANILA, 600 ft. to the pound. 
" ROYAL " MANILA, 550 ft. to the pound. 
"ROYAL" MANILA, 500 ft. to the pound. 
STANDARD, - 500 ft. to the pound. 
SISAL, - - 500 ft. to the pound. 

Our " ROYAL " Brand of Binder Twine is manufactured of the finest raw material 
that can be obtained, and with the utmost care. For length and strength we have no com 
petitors. Our twine is manufactured with the latest machinery, and dealers desiring to have 
exclusive agencies should apply at once. 

Write, Wire or 'Phone. 



CANADIAN CORDAGE & MfO. CO., Limited 

Peterborough, Ont. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 11, 1904 



SHOT. 

In ordering, please specify The Abbey Im- 
proved Chilled Shot Co., Ltd., New- 
cast le-on-Tyne. 

N.B.— We also make Hard and Soft Shot but 
strongly recommend Improved Chilled Shot for 
penetration. 

N.B.— The only Company in Great Britain de- 
voting its whole time to Shot making. 



ONTARIO SILVER CO., 

Limited, 
NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA. 

- , , FLATWARE, CUTLERY and 

Manufacturers of ELECTRO PLATE. . . . 

Ask for our Catalogue and Quotations. 



Diias Am Worts 

Dundas, Canada. 

Write for Prices 



m P. BERTRAM, - Manager. 




Steel St amps 



For Manufacturers of 
MACHINERY and METALWARE 

All our work is guaranteed to be satisfactory. 



THE PARSONS-IRONS CO. 
58 Adelaide St. W., TORONTO. 



Your Customers 

the farmers are looking for a fence, strong, 
serviceable and durable at a reasonable 
cost. You can supply it to them in the 



AL 




It is strictly up-to-date and the best value 
to be had in wire fencing to-day. 

A GOOD SELLER 

We have a style for every purpose in either 
heavy or light fencing. Write for cata- 
logue showing fencing and gates. 

CoiledSpring Wire 

unexcelled in quality, shipped promptly 
THE 

McGregor=Banwell Fence Co. 



Limited 



Walkerville, Ont. 

MEBBICK, ANDERSON * CO , Winnipeg 

Sole Agents for Manitoba andN. W. T. 




This design a guar- 
antee of quality 



DO YOU PUBLISH A CATALOGUE? 

IF YOU DO YOU SHOULD USE "CANADIAN-MADE " PAPER. All grades, 
from the highest " Glossy Finish " to the rough "Antique " and bulky "Featherweight." 



Your printer 
can supply it. 



Canada Paper Co, 



i 



Toronto 



Montreal 



GALVANIZED FENCE HOOK r °" " ""'"° """""" """ ** ""' 

FENCE HOOK 



WIRE NAILS, COILED SPRING, 
BARB and PLAIN FENCE WIRE, 
OILED and ANNEALED, CLOTHES 
LINE WIRE, STAPLES, etc. 



THE WESTERN WIRE & NAIL CO., Limited, 



LONDON. ONT 




" Little Shaver ' 



Canadian Agents : 

E. H GRENFELL & CO. 

LONDON, ONT. 



Cutest Thing in the Kitchen 

Shaves chocolate so thin that it dissolves without stirring. 
Slices Potatoes, Radishes, Cucumbers, Onions, Apples and 
all the smaller fruits and vegetables 
Made of black walnut. 
Knife is fine tempered steel. 

MADE ONLY BY 

J. M. MAST MFG. CO.. Lititz. Pa. 



SPECIAL 

DROP FORGED 

SPRINGS 

Tile WALLACE BARNES CO., 

BRISTOL, CONN. 





THE HINGE IS COMPLETE, AND 
WORKS WITH THE UTMOST 
FREEDOM. 




CAVERHILi, LEARMONT & CO., Agents 

at Montreal and Winnipeg. 



Sold to the trade only. 

Manufactured and sold by 

OWEN SOUND WIRE FENCE CO., Limited 

OwenllSound, Ont. TZ^ 



June 11, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 




ONEIDA 

COMMUNITY'S 

WELDLESS 

COW TIES. 



Illustration shows the 

NIAGARA W, ** K 
"Dominion" (or 
"Short") Type. 



Also made in "CLOSED RING," "OPEN 
RING," and " THREE CHAIN" TYPES. 

Oneida Community Cow Ties can be had of all the leading jobbers. 
We invite correspondence where any difficulty is experienced in 
obtaining our goods. 



Address 



Write for New Catalogue. 



ONEIDA COMMUNITY, Limited. 

NIAGARA FALLS, ONT. 



STEEL WIRE NAILS 

FOR ALL PURPOSES. 
A large quantity of 

STANDARD SIZES in Stock 

WOOD SCREWS, 

BRIGHT WIRE GOODS, 

WIRE STAPLES. 



WIRE 



OF ALL KINDS 

AND 
FOR ALL PURPOSES. 



COPPER WIRE 

for 
TROLLEY - TELEGRAPH - TELEPHONE 
and 
TRANSMISSION LINES 

Manufactured by 

DOMINION WIRE MFG. CO. 



MONTREAL and TORONTO 



LIMITED 



American Steel & Wire Co. 



New York 

Empire Building 



Montreal 

N. Y. Life Building 



Chicago 

The Rookery 



BARBED WIRE GALVANIZED PLAIN WIRE 

PLAIN TWIST CABLE FENCING 

Telegraph and Telephone Wire; Mattress, Broom, Weaving Wires of 
every description; Rail Bonds, Bale Ties, Special Wires for all 
purposes, Springs, Horse Shoes, Wire Rope, Cold-drawn Steel 
Shafting. 




WIRE CLOTH 

Special Regalvanized Cloth for Apple and 



Fruit Drying. 



Stock widths, 24, 30 and 36 in. 

Other widths and meshes made to order. 



Also y 2 in. Galvanized Netting. 



Stock widths, 24, 30 and 36 in. 
Stock lengths, 25 and 50 yards 



Also Wire Cloth and Netting, for all purposes. 

THE B. GREENING WIRE CO., Limited 



Hamilton, Ont. 



Montreal, Quo, 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 11, 1904 




TWO MAN OR PONY LAWN MOWER. 



ALL SIZES IN STOCK. 



PONY .* 
LAWN MOWERS 

We make in Canada the 

Genuine Cold well 



pattern — the best known and best 
esteemed Lawn Mower in the 
world. 



PROMPT SHIPMENT. 



SIZES — 25 in., 30 in., 35 in., 40 in. Made with 4 blades and 6 blades. Grass Catcher and Lawn Shoes also supplied. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE " B" AND FOR PRICE LIST. 

THE TA YLOR-FORBES CO., Limited 



Montreal Branch : 

9 Do Bresoles St 



GUELPH, CANADA. 

The largest manufacturers of Hardware in Canada. 



Kemp's Cold Blast Lanterns 

The success which our Lantern has achieved is largely demonstrated 
by the points of superiority that it possesses. 

A Combination Lift and Hinge Lantern. 

It is easily adjusted. 

Its burning qualities are unexcelled— 

WILL NOT BLOW OUT. 

WILL NOT SMOKE. 

WILL NOT LEAK. 

WILL NOT BREAK GLOBES. 

If your customers desire such a lantern, sell 
them ours. 




THEY DO NOT COST MORE T HAN OTHER MAKES 

KEMP MANUFACTURING CO., TORONTO, CAN. 



10 



June 11, 1904 



Hardware and Metal 



I A Business Man's Impressions of Western Canada. 



An Interview with Wm. Vallance. of Wood, Vallance & Co., Hamilton. 



FEW Canadian business men" 
keep in closer touch with the 
developments in Manitoba, 
Northwest Territories and 
British Columbia than Wm. 
Vallance, of Wood, Vallance & Co., 
wholesale hardware dealers, Hamilton. 

Mr. Vallance returned on Saturday 
from a trip to the Pacific coast, after 
visiting many of the principal trade 
centres en route. In 
an interview with 
Hardware and Metal 
he expressed continued 
confidence that the 
West should make, in 
the years to come, 
greater progress than 
has been the case in 
any of the years which 
have gone. 

"The prosperity and 
progress extends right 
to the Coast," said 
Mr. Vallance. "In 
Victoria, a city con- 
sidered to be somewhat 
slow and conservative, 
there is every indica- 
tion of growth and 
business activity. New 
buildings are going 
up; the merchants are 
busy; in every way the 
city looks busier than 
on my last visit. This 
city is steadily pro- 
gressing on a sound, 
substantial basis. 

BUSY VANCOUVER. 

"Vancouver is won- 
derful. Buildings are 
going up in every 
direction. Growth is manifest in every 
way. In fact, the city seems to be de- 
veloping at a rate that an eastern man 
cannot see the cause of. It is quite 
evident, however, that, though the rea- 
sons for such abounding prosperity in 
Vancouver are not apparent on the sur- 
face, they exist, for the oldest and most 
c< nservative houses there are going' 



ahead with extensions with every confi- 
dence. 

"The lumber trade, as your Vancouver 
correspondent has stated, is depressed. 
But outside of that line, business 
throughout the Province of British Co- 
lumbia is improving. The mining' in- 
dustry seems to be freed Erbm the booms 
and wildcat schemes of former days, 
and the developments in the Kootenay 




ten- that country, and is bound to go 
ahead. The other towns in (lie district 
are in good shape. There are not so 
many people on (he street, consequently 
not the same apparent activity. But 
there is more real industry and more 
actual business. 

"The Okanagan Valley is rapidly be- 
coming a fruit country that will com- 
pare favorably with either Ontario or 
California,. A p p 1 e s, 
c h e r r i e s, p 1 n m s, 
pears; in fact, all the 
fruits that grow in 
Ontario can be pro- 
duced successfully in 
the Okanagan. They 
have a superb market 
111 the Northwest 
prairies. 

"I did not 
along the route 
tween Winnipeg 
British Columbia 



stop 
be- 
an d 



Ma. Wm. Vallanc 



country are along solid, businesslike 
lines. The industry now seems to be 
controlled by men who understand the 
business and are permanent, rather than 
temporary, results. 

"Nelson appears to be in good shape. 
There are no empty houses there, and 
business is substantial. This city is 
now undoubtedly the distributing centre 



Winnipeg's growth. 

"Winnipeg is simply 
marvelous, the ware- 
houses, bank buildings, 
and office buildings, 
which have been put 
up in recent years, 
or now being- erected, 
would be a credit to 
any city in the world. 
The C.P.R. have un- 
der way their new sub- 
way at Main street, 
are ready to break 
ground for their big 
hotel, and have about 
completed their new 
shops, which are three 
or "four times the size 
of the old ones. This activity, together 
with the erection of hundreds of houses 
in all parts of the city, gives to Winni- 
peg an air of progress and prosperity 
which cannot fail to arouse interest, 
if not the enthusiasm, of every visitor. 
These developments are. moreover, 
the strongest proof which can be given 
of the confidence which has inspired 



11 



Hardware and Metal 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



Jmi? 11.. 1904 



business men in ;ill parts of Canada in 
tlie future nf the city. The large 
wholesale and hank buildings, it must he 
remembered, are being put up by capi- 
talists who are investing the necessary 
money l" ensure a permanent and ex- 
tensive connection in the West. 

COMMERCIAL PROGRESS. 

"The developments to date have 
largely been of a commercial nature, 
its geographical position and railway 
facilities have combined to make Win- 
nipeg the distributing- point for Mani- 
toba and the Northwest Territories, 
right out to the Koeky Mountains, so as 
that country grows the city will expand. 
Every one in Canada knows how the 
prairie country has grown in recent 
years, and how immigration is pouring 
in this year. There is every reason 
why wholesale and manufacturing Arms 
who have not had a connection in Win- 
nipeg should be securing one now. 

FACTORIES WILL FOLLOW. 

"Industrial developments are bound 
to follow the commercial. Some factor- 
ies are now being erected, there, and 
others are bound to follow, especially 
as the raw material in many lines is 
close enough at hand to make the pro- 
duction of the finished goods as eco- 
nomical as their production elsewhere, 
together with freight charges, would 
entail . 

THE GRAND TRi NK PACIFIC. 

"The construction of the G. T. P. 
will open up another country, equal to 
the best of Manitoba, and better than 
the average along the line of the rail- 
way now opening through the country. 
The West is undoubtedly a country of 
great possibilities. " 

AMERICAN COMPETITION. 

"Do you find the competition of 
American companies," inquired Hard- 
ware and Metal, "more serious than in 
former years?'' 

"It is probably so in some lines," 
answered Mr. Vallance, "but one must 
take into consideration that competi- 
tion is always keener on a falling; mar- 
ket. As all your readers know, while 
prices are not materially lower at pres- 
ent, there is not the same buoyancy 
which was the case last year. The keen- 
ness of competition is not the result of 
American invasion alone, as Canadian 
houses are themselves looking for busi- 
ness with more vim and determination 
than ever, and, apart altogether from 
the rivalry of American manufacturers, 
are keeping each other busy to hold 
their grip on the trade in the West. 



In some lines it must be remembered, 
however, the Canadian manufacturers 
were not in a position last year to sup- 
ply all the demand, with the result that 
the goods were bought on the United 
States market. This has given some 
American manufacturers a connection 
which in a time of depression in their 
own market, like the present, they will 
not be willing to relinquish without a 
keen struggle. In British Columbia, 
both at the Coast and in the Kootenay, 
the competition of Seattle is a factor 
which the Canadian houses have to re- 
cognize in their dealings." 

THE WEST FOR THE RETAILER. 

"Is the West a promising field for 
retail merchants?" asked Hardware 
and Metal?" 

"Not in the same way that it is for 
the man who goes out to develop the 
country and take the rewards that are 
offered by the fertility of the soil and 
the cheapness of agricultural land. In 
the western towns, as in the eastern 
centres, there is much rivalry on the 
part of retailers for business, and un- 
less one knows his line thoroughly and 
has sufficient capital, the western towns 
do not, in my opinion, offer materially 
greater inducements to a retail mer- 
chant than are offered in the older prov- 
inces of the Dominion. The man who 
is to win best results in the West is 
the one who goes out with determina- 
tion to work hard with his hands, as 
well as with his brain. " 



ORDERS FOR RAILS FROM 
CANADA. 

American railmakers areexpectingheavy 
rail orders from Canada for next year's 
delivery, says the Wall Street Journal. 
Predictions of early fall bookings for many 
thousands of tons of standard shapes for 
Canadian roads are made by members of 
the rail pool who have exceptional oppor- 
tunities of knowing in what quarters rails 
are needed. The Canadian Northern and 
the Canadian Pacific both will need thous- 
ands of tons of new steel rails long before 
the new Canadian tariff of $7 per ton on 
American rails can become operative. 
United States railmakers know that the 
Canadian roads will get all the rails they 
can from England, but in all competitive 
business they are confident that they can 
underbid the English makers. Only a 
short time ago the Pennsylvania Steel Co. 
demonstrated its ability to furnish rails to 
Canadian roads at about $8 per ton less 
than rails are sold to consumers this side 
of the border. 

t2 



CATALOGUES, BOOKLETS, ETC. 

For the convenience of its readen Hardware and 
Metal has opened its columns for the review of catalogues, 
booklets or other such publications issued by manufacturers 
or wholesale dealers selling to the hardware, plumbing, 
machinery or metal trades. Retailers desiring such publica- 
tions may also have inserted a note to that effect. It is re- 
quested that when any of the trade write for any booklet 
mentioned in these columns that they credit Hardware 
and Metal as the source of their information. 



Niles Bement-Pond Co. 

THE handsome new catalogue of the 
Niles-Rement-Pond Co., of New 
York, ei titled, "Machine Tools," 
has just been received through their 
Canadian rep' t sentatives, the Fairbanks 
Co., and is or of the finest ever issued. 
It is a large volume, containing over 
7(H) pages and, taking it all through, 
if is a work ..f art. The paper used is 
the best, and the illustrations are su- 
perb, bringing out the details in an ex- 
cellent manner. The first pages are 
devoted to illustrations of the various 
works of the company, showing their 
great extent, followed by pictures of 
the different medals and diplomas re- 
ceived for exhibits, which are very num- 
erous. The }>( dy of the work is made 
up of illustrations and descriptions of 
the machine tools manufactured, which 
include hydraulic machinery, boring 
machines, drilling machines, steam 
hammers, gear cutting machinery, 
lathes of ail kinds, milling machines, 
planing machines, slotting machines, 
traveling erar.es, and many others, cov- 
ering the whole range of machine tools. 



A Ckthes Brush Free. 
The Saver Electric Company, Mont- 
real, are sending to the hardware trade 
absolutely free of charge a serviceable 
and handsome clothes brush, which 
would be welcomed in any store. Of 
course, this is done for advertising pur- 
poses, the name of the firm appearing 
in raised lelters on the back of the 
brush. It i~ quite evident that the 
Sayer Electric Company desire this 
brush to be a lasting advertisement, for 
thev have selected a brush that will last 



WIRE NAILS 
TACKS 



WIRE 



Prompt Shipment! 



The ONTARIO TACK CO 

Limited 
HAMILTON OWT. 



June 11, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



a long time. This is an article con- 
stantly required in a hardware store, and 
a postcard will bring one, the Saver 
Electric Co. paying the postage. Any 
reader who mentions this paper may se- 
cure one on request. Write before the 
supply is exhausted. 

Jobbing List. 

John Milieu &, Son, Montreal and 
Toronto, have issued a new jobbing list 
of sporting goods and sporting sun- 
dries. Every hardware merchant who 
has not already received one should 
write this lirui for a copy, mentioning 
Hardware and Metal. 

New Jersey Foundry & Machine Co. 
Hardware and Metal has received 

from the New Jersey Foundry & Ma- 
chine Co., 'J, 11, 13 and 15 Murray 
street, New York, a circular describing 
their Diamoi d Expansion Bolt and 
Shield. Some interesting illustrations 
are given, and the reader is furnished 
with figures giving dimensions of long 
and short standard shields, etc. The list 
prices are quoted. Any reader of Hard- 
ware and Metal may have a copy by 
writing this fnm. 

Safety Stop Valve. 
McLaughli i Bros., Philadelphia, are 
sending out catalogue A, illustrating 
and describing the McLaughlin Safety 
Slop Valve, which is a quick acting stop 
valve for boilers and main steam lines. 
Readers of Hardware and Metal may se- 
•cuie a copy oi this catalogue upon ap- 
plication. 

Detroit Pump Co. 

Hardware and Metal has received 
from the Detroit Pump Co., Detroit, a 
copy of the catalogue recently issued 
by this firm, describing and illustrating 
the Blackmer Rotary Pump, which may 
be used for tne engines, village water 
works, reservoirs, mines, quarries, 
wells, etc. Great claims are made for 
I his pump on account of its simplicity, 
economy and efficiency. Those inter- 
ested in liqu'd pumps should secure one 
of these catalogues. 

Marsh Steam Pumps. 
The American Steam Pump Co., 
Battle Creek. Mich., are sending out 
illustrated catalogue No. 12, in which 
is presented to the trade and steam 
users in general a complete list of the 
pumps manufactured by this firm, to- 
gether with the specifications. The lists 
and detail tabes are in convenient form 
for reference and comparison. It 



Put 

Sherwin=Williams 
Varnish Stain on 
Your Shelves 

and you'll add a quick-selling and 
profitable specialty to your paint 
stock. 

Varnish Stain is specially in de- 
mand during house-cleaning days. 
It stains and varnishes chairs, tables, 
cabinets, woodwork, etc., by one 
application. It correctly imitates 
the natural woods. It's very easy 
to put on — does good work always. 

Varnish Stain is well ad- 
vertised. It is brought 
before the consumer in all 
our advertising. It is one 
of the leaders in The S-W. 
Full Line. 

Write us today for prices 
and full particulars. 



W THE SHERWIN-WILLIAMS CO, 

PAINT AND VARNISH MAKERS 



CANADIAN HEADQUARTERS 
AND PLANT 

2i St. Antoine St., Montreal. 

1219 




would be a most useful catalogue for 
prospective buyers of steam pumps to 
have, and also would be a valuable 
catalogue of ltference for all users of 
steam pumps Readers of Hardware 
and Metal may secure a copy upon ap- 
plication. 

Atlas Car & Manufacturing Co. 
The Atlas Car & Manufacturing Co., 
Cleveland, 0., are presenting to their 
patrons catalogue No. 1018, illustrat- 
ing and briefly describing various styles 
of mine and rre cars, and also a com- 
plete line of dump cars adapted for 
work of all kinds. Readers of Hard- 
ware and M-V.al may secure a copy of 
this catalogue upon application to the 
Atlas Car & Manufacturing Co. 



NO REORGANIZATION OF 
U.S STEEL. 

A large stockholder of the United States 
Steel Corporation, who is thoroughly 
13 



familiar with the industry, says; " I 
notice a reference every little while in the 
financial press as to a possible reorganiza- 
tion of the United States Steel Corporation. 
I will go on record as saying that there 
will never be a reorganization of the 
United States Steel Corporation so long as 
Andrew Carnegie and Henry Clay Frick 
live. The latter would never permit of a 
reorganization which might make possible 
the property reverting to Mr. Carnegie. 
The second mortgage bond issue was fin- 
anced for the very purpose of preventing- 
such a reorganization, and these are nick- 
named in Pittsburg the 'Frick buffer bonds'.. 
They cannot be foreclosed for two years 
after default, and if there should ever come 
a depression in the steel trade which would 
endanger the fixed charges of the company, 
and I don't believe there ever will, H. C. 
Frick and his Standard Oil associates 
would put their hands in their pockets and 
make good the interest rather than per- 
mit the property to fall into Carnegie's lap. 
I know whereof I speak". 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 11, 1904 




ONTARIO. 

'IMIE stock of the estate of M. T. 
Cathcart, general merchant, Bar- 
wick, has been sold to M. C. 
Drew. 

G. C. Haines, carriage maker, Bow- 
man ville, is dead. 

J. A. Denning, general merchant, Ker- 
wood, has sold out to R. Parker. 

J. Denning, general merchant, Ker- 
wood, has sold out to C. Johnston. 

A meeting of the creditors of D. 
Gillies, general merchant, Elmvale, was 
called for June 7. 

The plant and machinery of the W. J. 
Bradley Machinery Co., Toronto, are 
advertised for sale. 

A meeting of the creditors of the 
Acetylene Lighting Co., London, is to 
be held on June 14. 

QUEBEC. 

W. Wilson, general merchant, St. Jude, 
is dead. 

F. Gareau, general merchant, Rigaud, 
has assigned to Lamarche & Benoit. 

J. Tremblay, general merchant, 
Tremblay, has effected a compromise. 

Bell Bros., general merchants, Kasu- 
bazua, have sold out to A. Pritchard. 

E. Laliberte, general merchant, Lot- 
biniere, has assigned to V. E. Paradis. 

Tbe assets of A. D'Anjou, general 
merchant, Riviere Ouelle, have been 
sold. 

P. Morin, general merchant, Ste. 
Tburibe, has advertised his business for 
sale. 

The assignment of J. Fisher, general 
merchant, Jonquieres, has been de- 
manded. 

J. L. Seguin, general merchant, St. 
Simon, is ottering to compromise at 65c 
on the dollar. 

J. Burns & Co., manufacturers of 
ranges, Montreal, have had their plant 
and stock damaged by fire. 

Fire has destroyed the premises of O. 
Richard, general merchant, St. Valere 
l)e Bulstrode; loss partially covered by 
insurance. 

MANITOBA AND N.W.T. 

J. Morrison, general merchant, Grand 
View, has sold out. 

J. Dreidger, general merchant, Blum- 
enfelt, is giving up business. 

H. M. Aldous, general merchant, Lor- 
lie, has removed to Lemberg. 

M. Ateah, general merchant, Winni- 
peg Beach, has sold out to M. Tiron. 



THE RECOGNIZED 

4th OF JULY REVOLVER 




/. J. Model 1900 Double Action EStpM 



The best Revolver for the money in the world. Order of your jobber, and 
insist upon getting it. Do not allow of substitution. Made by 

Iver Johnson's Arms & Cycle Works 



MAKERS OF THE FAMOUS 



TVER JOHNSON REVOLVERS, GUNS »„* BICYCLES 



NEW YORK OFFICE, 

No 99 Chambers Street. 



ARMORIES &• GENERAL OFFICES, 

Fitchburg, Mass., V. S- A- 



A. Stinson, hardware merchant, Man- 
or, has sold out to J. L. Williamson. 

Smith & Wilson, general merchants, 
DeWinton, have sold out to R. Paling. 

W. K. Cross, dealer in bicycles, Moose 
Jaw, has been succeeded by Moody & 

t IOSS. 

J. W. Ileric & Co., general merchants, 
Wetaskiwin, have sold out to G. F. 
Carniel. 

W. G. Fulford & Co., general mer- 
chants, Mather, have sold out to Gordon 
& Ilurssell. 

J. G. Struthers & Co., general mer- 
chants, Cartwright, have removed to 
Goose Lake. 

F. G. Casey, general merchant, Tan- 
tallon, has admitted A. S. MacDonald 
to partnership. 

Application has been made to change 
the name of the Dominion Steam Heat- 
ing Co., of Winnipeg, to the John 
Plaxton Co. 

BRITISH COLUMBIA. 

Carruthers & Cousens, painters, Chil- 
liwack, have dissolved partnership. 

II. Tanaka & Son, bicycle dealers, 
Cumberland, have advertised that they 
are giving up business. 

II. Byers, hardware merchant, San- 
don, is discontinuing business in that 
place. 

14 



IRON WORKS PLANT FOR SALE. 

The equipment of the insolvent Nor- 
throp Iron Works, at Valleyfield, Que., 
the manufacturers for Canada of the 
Draper looms, has been purchased by the 
Fairbanks Co., who will dispose of 
same at auction, at their Toronto ware- 
house, on July 2. The list includes 
over one hundred tools, such as mould- 
ing and foundry equipment, pattern- 
shop equipment, air compressor, etc., 
all of the highest grade American make. 
Copy of the list of tools to be sold will 
be issued by the Fairbanks Co. next 
week, and the tools will be sold to the 
highest bidder in order to get rid f 
them quickly. This should prove a good 
opportunity to get first-class tools at a 
low figure. 



The Mexican Light, Heat & Power 
Co., Montreal, recently placed an order 
in the United States for copper cable 
foi transmission, which is said to be 
the largest single order for single trans- 
mission cable ever placed. The order 
calls for 1,500 miles of cable, equal in 
carrying capacity to 3-0 B. & S. 
gauge, and weighing 4,200,000 pounds. 
The cable is to be used on the Nicaxia- 
Mexico power transmission line, now 
under construction, and it will be sup- 
ported on steel towers in spans of 500 
feet. The cable was designed by W. G. 
Clark, of Seattle, E. E., Seattle, Wash. 



June 11, 1904 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO. 



wholesale TEMPORARY WAREHOUSE: 

ONLY - 212-218 Cowan Avenue. 

offic T :! e pa h r°rr58«. SAMPLE ROOM and ORDER OFFICE -21 Scott Street 



LIMITED 
ONLY 

WHOLESALE. 

Telephone, 
Warehouse, Park 1585. 




^<\j^ lb Grass S 



LAWN MOWERS 



Snaths 




No. 1— Drive Ring, 2 Hole 




"Daisy," 8 in. Low Solid Wheel, 3 Knives. 

"Star," 9 in. Open " 3 " 

"Woodyatt," 10% in. " " 4 

Tin Grass Catchers 

for Woodyatt Mower only. 




Maple Wood Bowls 



" favorite " Churns 




FOR FULLER PARTICULARS SEE OUR CATALOGUE "Loader" Churns 

H. S. HOWLAND, SONS & CO., l, m , ted . Toronto. 

Our prices are right. GRAHAM NAILS ARE THE BEST. 

Factory: Dufferin Stre»t, Toronto, Ont. 



We Ship Promptly. 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



June 11, 1904 



lew and Second-Hand Machinery, 

Engines, Boilers, Belting, Pulleys, 

Motors, Etc. 

Any readers of this paper wanting 
any of the above goods may have 
an advertisement inserted free in 
Hardware and Metal, the 
machinery weekly newspaper of 
Canada, by enclosing this notice. 
Address 

HARDWARE and METAL 

Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg. 



The 



Hamilton Steel & Iron Company 



LIMITED 



HAMILTON, • CANADA. 

OPEN HEARTH 

STEEL CASTINGS 

OF ANY WEIGHT. 



I 



NOT IN THE COMBINE 

Ask for Prices of 

Shovels, Spades, Sooops, Etc. 

WE HAVE A LARGE STOCK. 

CANADA HARDWARE CO., Limited, Montreal 



f 



SPECIAL NOTICE. 



WE NOW HAVE IN STOCK A COMPLETE 
LINE OF 

INDIA OIL STONES 

AND CAN MAKE PROMPT SHIPMENTS of 

ANY SIZE, SHAPE, OR GRADE STONE 
YOU MAY DESIRE. 

Uniform Quality, 
Wonderful Durability, 
Every Stone Guaranteed. 

(Send for Catalogue). 



The NORTON EMERY 

and 

CORUNDUM 
WrlEELSETURN 



- are - M1G «4 to 

QUICK CUTTING, p . ^ ^ 
DURABLE, WATErtFR<feF?-w W 

NO DUST, NO ODOR. *@**j<£ U 

EVERY WHEEL 




TESTED BEFORE 
SOLD. 



(Send for Catalogue). 



Sole Canadian Agents. 



The Fairbanks Company 



Montreal 



Toronto 



Winnipeg 



Vancouver 



16 



June 11, 1901 



Hardware and Metal 




THE MACHINERY MARKETS. 



G 



Qnabae. 

Office of Hardware and Metal, 
10 Front Street, East. 

Toronto, June 10, 1904. 

OOD as the machinery market 
has been for - the past two 
weeks, there seems to be an 
indication that it will be 
still better in the near fu- 
ture, as far as one can judge from the 
outlook, as viewed by some of the Mon- 
treal dealers. During the present week 
there is a slight dullness which is no 
doubt due to the unfavorable weather 
resulting in the holding back of intend- 
ed installations. At several of the ma- 
chinery agencies surprise was expressed 
at the rumor that American manufac- 
turers were cutting prices for Canadian 
export, as they had heard nothing of it, 
and stated that prices continued the 
same. The representative of one Am- 
erican firm who was in the city this 
week, said that they were doing 7. r > pel 
cent, of the business they did during the 
boom, and that thev had no difficulty 
finding a market for their output, with- 
out increasing discounts. 

As reported last week, the demand For 
wood working machinery still keeps up, 
and several boiler installations are re- 
ported. An order for a 25 ton crane 
was also received. Electrical machinery 
is in good demand, and several orders 
have been placed for complete electric 
installations. 

Ontario. 

Office of Hardware and Metal. 
10 Front 9treet east. 

Toronto, June 10. 1904 

NO very important contracts have 
been closed by local dealers this 
week. The usual amount of busi- 
ness has been done, but nothing special 
lias transpired. Enquiries have been 
coming in, and the prospect for the 
closing of a few substantial orders are 
fairly good. 

The demand for engines and boilers has 
not been so brisk as it has been for 
some time, while the amount of busi- 
ness done in planing mill machinery and 
wood working machinery in general has 
not been quite up to the mark. Iron 
working machinery has made a fairly 
good showing. 



Machinery and Electrical Notes. 

ANEW boiler making plant is about 
to be established in Canada, and 
will probably be located at Am- 
herst, N. S. It will be a Canadian 
branch of the Robb-Munford Engineering 
Co.. of Boston, and for this purpose the 
capital stock of the company has been 
increased $450,000. A large amount of 
new machinery will be required to equip 
these works. 

The Canadian Government has granted 
a patent to X. -J. Gregorie, St. Johns, 
Que., for an electric time switch. 

The right tool for the job is always 
the best tool, and vice versa. Don't use 
either a monkey-wrench for a hammer, 
or a hammer for a monkey-wrench. 

The extension of the Guelph street 
railway from the terminus on the Elora 
road to the Union cemetery has been 
commenced. The amount of track need- 
ed in the extension will be 3,000 feet. 

A company is being organized in St. 
Thomas, Out., to run an auto car be- 
tween that city and Port Stanley. It 
is proposed to make hourly trips, carry- 
ing not more than 25 persons each trip. 

The Toronto & Niagara Power Co. 
are seeking suitable sites in Toronto 
and Niagara for sub-stations, to be 
used in the distribution of the electrical 
energy transmitted from the power 
house at the Falls. 

The Frcdericton Gas Light Co., 
Fredericton, N. B., have placed an order 
with the Westinghouse Electric Co. for 
a 175 kilowatt direct connected gener- 
ator. They have also placed an order 
for a 300 horse power cross compound 
Robb-Armstrong engine, and a Mumford 
boiler of greater horse power. 

Construction work has been com- 
menced on the new power house of the 
Winnipeg Electric Street Railway Co. 
The new plant will practically double 
the present power plant. It will be 110 
feet long and 55 feet wide, and the 
building operations will be hurried for- 
ward. The Street Railway Co. are also 
having erected two new car sheds, and 
are extending the present gas plant. 
Altogether the company will expend 
.^500,000 in improvements. 



R. Moncel, electrical contractor, SI. 
Peter street, Montreal, has under way a 
Urge saw mill wiring contract at Sud- 
bury, tie is also engaged on the Can- 
ada cold storage building, and is com- 
mencing to instal the electrical equip- 
ment of the new F. X. St. Charles 
building on St. Francis Xavier street. 

The College Bourget has just been 
i.iiished at Rigaud, by Durand & Co., of 
Jolielte. It is a handsome five-storey 
cut stone building, 55x120 ft., situated 
on the hill* commanding a splendid view 
of Ottawa. It is heated by steam, and 
is at present lighted by acetylene gas, 
but a complete electric plant is about 
to be installed. 

The City Council of Nanaimo, B. ('., 
has received a communication from C. 
Brandeis, electrical engineer, represent- 
ing a Montreal syndicate, asking for a 
charter for the construction of an elec- 
tric street railway system. The com- 
pany also proposes building a suburban 
line between the city and Brechen, at 
the newly discovered coal fields of the 
Western Fuel Co. The power will be 
derived from the Nanaimo River Falls. 

S. R. Callaway, president of the Am- 
erican Locomotive & Machine Works, is 
dead, and in his death is removed a very 
prominent figure from the railroad cir- 
cles of this continent. Mr. Callaway is 
a Canadian, having received his railway 
training with the Grand Trunk. He be- 
came manager of the now Grand Trunk 
Western, and thereafter his career may 
be traced from step to step until he be- 
came railway manager of the New York 
Central. In 1901 he resigned this posi- 
tion lo assume control of the extensive 
operations of the American Locomotive 
& Machine Co. 

It is said that the Grand Trunk Rail- 
way Co. have acquired an option on a 
controlling interest in the Hamilton, 
Grimsby & Beamsville Electric Rail- 
way, and that before this month is out 
tiie electric railway may be turned over 
to the G. T. R. Co. The proposal is to 
run the line as an adjunct of the steam 
railroad. For some time the II., G . tV 

B. Co. have been doing a large business 
in the fruit line in connection with the 

C. P. R. and the Dominion Kxpress 
Co. and it is understood that all this 
fruit business will be diverted to the (i. 
T. R. and the Dominion Express Co. 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



June 11, 1904 



THE FIELD OF THE GAS ENGINE. 



ABOUT ten years ago it was pro- 
phesied that gas engines would, 
in a very few years, entirely dis- 
place steam engines, but the steam en- 
gine was too long in the field and H|o 
firmly established to be easily discarWd. 
Since then many refinements have Kft'en 
place in the steam engine to hMtf it 
keep its hold, but the gas engin^^has 
been steadily increasing in popurarity, 
and has in many places supersedttjf th. 
others, but to a much greater elQlJnt 
England and Europe than in Americ^l^ 
This latter is probably due to the fact 
that gas has not been cheap in Am- 
erica, and electric motors have been in- 
troduced in such enormous quantities 
that gas engines have not been in such 
great demand. 

The idea of deriving power from the 
energy of an explosion by means of a 
motor is at least as old as Watt's in- 
vention of a means of turning the ex- 
pansive force of steam to account. 
Iluyghens proposed, in 1680, to make an 
engine in which the explosion of gun- 
powder in the cylinder would force the 
piston forward and so produce power. 



Something like this is what is done in 
the gas engine. However, it is hardly 
necessary to say that no practical 



was the Lenoir gas engine of 1860. In 
this engine a mixture of gas and air 
was drawn into the cylinder for about 
half-stroke, the valves closed, and the 
mixture ignited or exploded, producing 
thus for the last half of the stroke con- 




8oo h. p. Gas Engine. 



working motor was made on this plan 
nor at this time. Several more or less 
successful attempts were made to solve 
the problem, but, the first successful in- 
ternal combustion motor or gas engine 




Gas Engine for Dynamo. 



sidcrable pressure. This engine was 
double acting, like the ordinary steam 
engine, that is, it had the force applied 
on opposite sides of the pistons 
alternately. These engines were 
introduced commercially to 
some extent, as they ran 
smoothly and quietly, but 
consumed a rather large 
amount of gas. As Watt's 
steam engine was intro- 
duced in 1769, it had a long 
start on the other. The 
next great step in advance 
was the introduction in 
1876 of the famous Otto gas 
engine, and as practically 
all engines built since op- 
erate on the same plan, a 
brief description will be 
given. The engine is usu- 
ally single acting, or in 
other words, receives the 
pressure of the explosion 
only on the back side of the 
piston, the front of the 
cylinder being open. A 
series of operations is as 
follows : 

The piston being at the 
back end of the cylinder, 
and just ready to start for- 
ward, the inlet valve opens, 
and the mixture of gas and 
air is drawn in as the pis- 
ton moves forward. When 
the piston has reached the 
limit of its forward move- 
ment, the cylinder is full of 
the mixture of gas and air. 
All the valves then close and 
the piston on its return 



June 11, 1904 



MACHINERY 



Hardware and Metal 



Persons addressing advertisers will 
kindly mention having seen their ad- 
vertisement in Hardware and Metal. 



NEWMAN'S PATENT 
INVINCIBLE FLOOR SPRINGS 

Combine all the qualities deirable in a Door 
Closer. They work silently an i effectually, and 
never get out of order. In use in many of the 
public buildings throughout Great Britain and 
the Colonies. 

MADE SOLELY BY 

W. NEWMAN ft SONS, Birmingham. 



WHY NOT BUY 



K 

E 
R 
R 

S 



Brass Globe, Stand- 
ard and Cobjier Alloy 
Discs, Steam and Hoi 
Water Radial or 
Valves, Brass and 
Iron Weber Gate 
Valves, Check Valves, 
etc. 



THOSE WHO DO GET SATIS- 
FACTION. 
SEND FOR CATALOGUE. 



V 
A 

L 
V 



THE KERR ENGINE CO., 



WALKERVILLE, ONT. 



SPECIFY 




Penberthy Injector Co., 



LIMITED. 



BRASS MFRS 



Windsor, Ont 



Buy the Best. 




HERCULES 

Sash Cord. 

Star Brand Cotton Rope 

Star Brand Cotton Clothes Lines 

Star Brand Cotton Twine 

For Sale by all Wholesale Dealers. 




"Pullman" 
Lawn Sprinkler 

IS YOUR 
ORDER IN? 

8end for Folder No. 14. 

PULLMAN MNFG. CO. 
Rochester, N.Y., U.S.A. 



WORK AND 

PRICES 

RIGHT 



ENGINE & PUMP CO, 

TORONTO, ONT. LIMiTED. 



BABBIT 




THE 




N9o 

no r 

STAR 
SPECIAL I 
HERCULES 
METALLIC 
IMPERIAL 



(an ada Metal (p. 



William StJORONTO. telephone main 1729. 



BEAVER POST HOLE DIGGER 

will please your customers. 
No wood to rot or check. 

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS TO THE TRADE. 

CANADA FOUNDRY COMPANY, 

LIMITED 
Head Office and Works, TORONTO, ONT. 

District Offices — Montreal, Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver, 
Victoria, Rossland. 





IWGISTERED 



TflAOE. MAR* 



If Corundum be no Better Than Emery, 

Then Emery is no Better 

Than Iron Ore. 

If the United States Government be right when it 
states that emery is a mechanical admixture of iron ore and 
corundum (Bulletin No. 180, Department of Interior), then 
you must agree that the above deduction is logical. 

To use iron ore for polishing or grinding iron or steel 
would be absurd ; then why use iron ore and corundum 
(emery) when you can obtain the pure abrasive — 

CRAIG MINE CRYSTAL CORUNDUM. 



The Canada Corundum Company, m* 



TORONTO, CANADA. 



19 



Hardware and Metal 



MACHINERY 



June 11, 1904 



stroke compresses the mixture of gas 
and air. As the piston again starts 
forward, the compressed gas and air is 
exploded, or ignited, by a spark, and 
the pressure thus produced is the source 
of the power of the engine. On the 
next stroke the products of combustion 
are expelled from the cylinder through 
the exhaust valve. The same cycle of 
operations is thus repeated indefinitely. 
It thus appears that only one stroke in 
lour is effective, and during the rest of 
the time the motion of the fly wheel is 
all that keeps the engine going, thus a 
gas engine must have a very heavy fly 
wheel. 

The greatest thermic efficiency of a 
steam engine is fourteen and one-quarter 
per cent., while that of the gas engine 
might be eighty-seven per cent., and it 
is quite possible to get in actual prac- 
tice an efficiency as high as half of this, 
it might be noted in passing that the 
canon is a gas engine, converting heat 
energy into mechanical, which has an 
actual thermo-dynamic efficiency of 50 
per cent. 

The gas engine possesses several ad- 
vantages over the steam engine, among 
which are : Cleanliness and freedom 
from drip, ashes, smoke, and other ob- 
jectionable accompaniments of the steam 
engine. The boiler and the danger of 
boiler explosion are eliminated. A 
licensed engineer, or even skilled labor, 
is not required to operate it. There is 
much less loss of energy in starting and 
stopping a gas engine than a steam en- 
gine, and there is no waste during the 
penods when the gas engine is idle be- 
tween runs. On the other hand, gas en- 
gines are not self-starting, but require 
to be turned over by hand, or by some 
auxiliary motor when used singly. They 
are apt to stop when overloaded, and 
the admission of the gas is sometimes 
troublesome. The cylinder usually re- 
quires to be water-jacketed, and even 
then the high temperature interferes 
with the lubrication. They are general- 
ly accompanied by a disagreeable odor. 

The efficiency of gas engines has been, 
and is now being, steadily increased. 
At present the consumption of ordinary 
illuminating gas is about 20 cubic feet 
perji^ p. hour in a fairly good en- 
gine of reasonable size. Even better 
economy than this is often obtained, 
and figures as low as 17, or even 15, 
cubic feet per h. p. hour are often 
realized in actual practice. 

Exporting Files. 

The Nicholson File Oo.'s Dominion 
Works are shipping a quantity of their 
increment cut files to England. The 
"Maple Leaf" brand is meeting with a 
ready sale. They are also having in- 
creased demand from all parts of the 
Dominion for the "Kearney <fe Foot," 
"Great Western," "Arcade," "Ameri- 
can," "Globe," and other brands, which 
keeps their factory busy. 



THE QUESTION OF LATHE QUALITY. 



EVIDF.NTLY the question of the rela- 
tive merits of the lathes offered 
on the Canadian market has 
aroused general attention on the part of 
the trade. Many readers have favored 
Hardware and Metal with their views, 
hut for one reason or another some of 
them decline to be quoted. 

A Guelph manufacturer, who was in- 
cluded among 1 those who declined to 
have his name published, was enthusias- 
tic over Caandian lathes. "Why," de- 
clared he, "the lathes made by Macdou- 
gall, of Gait, or Bertram, of Dundas, are 
as good machines in every particular as 
the imported article. These firms put 
solid merit and up-to-date, practical 
utility into their lathes, and so are able 
to meet in the matter of quality any 
machine tool maker who offers machines 
on the Canadian market." 

THE DODGE MFG. CO. 

G. F. Wheaton, secretary-treasurer of 
the Dodge Mfg. Co., Toronto, summed 
up his views as follows : 

"We consider the lathe manufactured 
by the John Bertram & Sons Co., Ltd., 
Dundas, Out., to be as good, if' not bet- 
ter, for ordinary purposes, than any 
other lathe on the market, whether Can- 
adian or American." 

ROBERT DAWSON, TORONTO. 

The Toronto representative of Dar- 
ling Bros., Robert Dawson, said when 
interviewed by Hardware and Metal : 

"There can be bin little doubt that 
John Bertram & Sons Co., Ltd., Dun- 
das, build the best Canadian machine 
tools. I think that the engine lathes 
for ordinary work, built in Canada, dis- 
play as good workmanship, and are as 
true as the ordinary engine lathe built 
by any manufacturer in the States. To 
compare Canadian and American manu- 
factured lathes in a more general way 
is very difficult, since there is 
such a variety of lathes built in 
the States, compared with the limited 
number of kinds turned out by Canadian 
firms. 1 think it hinges entirely on the 
largeness of the American market and 
the smallness of the Canadian market. 
The large American tool builders spe- 
cialize in one line, lathes, planers, drills 
or some other, and they are in a position 
to develop that line tc a much greater 
extent than any Canadian tool builder, 
since the Canadian builders cannot af- 
ford to specialize in one line of tools 
•20 



because the market for that line will 
not warrant the specialization. Some 
Canadian firms will manufacture a spe- 
cial kind of lathe if you wish one, but 
the trouble is that the\ have to start 
right at the beginning, namely, with the 
design and patterns. The patterns have 
to be made specially for that tool, and 
therefore their cost has to be added to 
the cost of the tool. Whereas, if you 
go to an American lathe builder for a 
special lathe, he has a very large num- 
ber of styles that they turn out regu- 
larly for you to choose from; and al- 
though you may not find exactly what 
you wish, it is very piobable that you 
will be able to find something very close 
to it, the slight alterations in which will 
not increase the cost of the tool ma- 
terially. Therefore, without doubt the 
American tool builder has a great ad- 
vantage over the Canadian builder in 
special lines. 

"Then, considering ordinary engine 
lathes, although the Canadian builder 
has the advantage of the 25 per cent, 
duty, still the raw material has to be 
taken into account. For the best line 
of tools American iron is always used, 
and therein the American builder can 
get ahead of the Canadian in being able 
to obtain his raw material at a lower 
cost." 

WILKINSON PLOW CO. 

The Wilkinson Plow Co., Toronto 
Junction, are of the opinion that for all 
ordinary machine shop work the best en- 
gine lathe built in Canada cannot be ex- 
celled ; and the superintendent of the 
works thinks that there is little doubt 
but that the lathe turned out by the 
John Bertram & Sons Co., Ltd., Dun- 
das, is the best on the Canadian mar- 
ket. 

"There are very many special lathes 
manufactured in the States," said the 
superintendent, "that are not attempted 
in Canada. The American builders spe- 
cialize; while Canadians cannot do it, 
and therefore, the American builders 
hold the market for special tools." 



The Menz Lumber Co. have been 
granted a license to do business in 
Manitoba. 



The Winnipeg Paint and Glass Co., 
Winnipeg, are applying for power to 
increase their capital stock from $75,000 
to $250,000. 



June 11, 1901 



HARDWARE AND METAL 



ALEXANDER GIBB 

Manufacturers' Agent and Metal Broker, 
13 St. John Street, Montreal 



Representing British and American Manu- 
facturers. Correspondence invited from firms 
wishing to be represented in Canada. 



Metal Sash 

Bars, 

Capitals an^. 

Bases for 

Plate Glass 

Windows. 

Various Finishes. 
Write for Prices. 

Dennis Wire 

* Iron Co. 

London . Ont. 



Fine Metal Finishes 
on Builders' Hardware. 

I do much fine work of this sort for lead- 
ing jobbers and manufacturers. 
Have you ever work of this sort to give 
out? Write me. 

D.SUTHERLAND 

Electro-Plater, 
112 Church Street, - - TORONTO 



MADE IN CANADA 





Threshermen, Attention! 

The Threshing belt that gives the greatest 
satisfaction is the " Maple Leaf " 

Stitched Cotton 
Duck Belt 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 

Dominion Belting Company 

Limited 

HAniLTON, ONTARIO. 

Ask your dealer for it and take no other. 

Beware of Imitations 

Our " Maple Leaf" Belt Dressing is the 
best on the market — made only by us. 



ASK YOUR 
DEALER FOR IT 



The man who uses Babbitt 
Metal will not feel like 
KICKING someone if he 
lines his bearings with 

Manganese 

/4nti-Friction Metal 

Price 18c. per lb. 
/ We pay freight on orders 

of 100 lbs. or over. 
Every ounce guaranteed. 



Syracuse Smelting Works, 



Montreal, 
New York, 
Seattle 




H. & R. SINGLE GUN AUTOMATIC AND NON -EJECTING 



12, 16 and 20 Guage. 

Steel and Twist Barrels 
Superior in Design, Workmanship 
and Finish, and the most popular 
Gun on the Market. 



Simplest 
Take Down " 
Gun Made 




HARRINGTON & RICHARDSON ARMS CO. 

Also makers of H. & R. Revolvers. 
Catalog on request. Worcester, Mass,, U.S.A. 



CELEBRATED 



HEINISCH 



SHEARS 




Tailors' Shears, 
Trimmers' Shears, 
Tinners' Snips, etc. 

ACKNOWLEDGED THE BEST. 

R. HEINISCH'S SONS CO. SIWKJ 



SEYMOUR 
SHEAR CO. 



SEYMOUR SHEARS 



HAVE BEEN THE 

Standard for over Half a Century. 

"QUALITY unquestioned." 
Each pair of our shears hears the above trade mark. 




Complete Line TRIMMERS , BANKERS', BARBERS' and TAIL 
ORS' SHEARS, Etc., Etc. 



Henry T. Seymour Shear Company. 

WIEBUSCH & MILGER, Limited, NEW YORK, Sole Agents. 



SEYMOUR 

SHEAR CO. 



Latest Cata- 

^ logue will be 

sent in 

exchange for 

your business 

card. 



21 



Hardware and Metal 

The Steam Turbine. 

IN common with all other steam en- 
gines, turbines transform into me- 
chanical work the energy given out 
by steam during its expanson from the 
initial pressure of admission to the pres- 
sure at the exhaust. But while recipro- 
cating engines effect this transformation 
of energy by means of variation in pres- 
sure of the steam, turbines can effect it 
both by means of the pressure and by 
means of the velocity of the steam 
while expanding. The employment of 
the velocity only in each moving wheel 
characterizes the action or impulsion 
turbines, among which may be cited the 
Laval and Curtis turbines, as well as 
that designed by Prof. A. Bateau, while 
the simultaneous employment of the 
velocity and partial use of the pressure 
characterize the reaction turbine, of 
which the best kno